LONGEVITY INDUSTRY LANDSCAPE
OVERVIEW 2017
Volume I: The Science of Longevity
Geroscience, Policy, and Economics
The Paradigm Shift: from Treatment to Prevention
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Table of contents
•Part I: Executive Summary........................................................................1
•Part II: Geroscience Research Landscape Overview 2017...................9
Part III: Infographic Summary.................................................................65
•Part IV:
Top 100 Longevity Research Labs.............................................76
Part V: Top 100 Longevity Non-Prots................................................179
•Part VI: Top 100 Longevity Conferences.............................................281
•Part VII: Top 100 Longevity Journals...................................................383
•Part VIII: Top 100 Longevity Books......................................................484
•Part IX: Top 100 Geroscientists............................................................589
•Part X: Top 50 Longevity Databases....................................................701
Advisors
Aubrey de Grey: Dr. de Grey is the biomedical
gerontologist who researched the idea for and
founded SENS Research Foundation. He re-
ceived his BA in Computer Science and Ph.D.
in Biology from the University of Cambridge
in 1985 and 2000, respectively. Dr. de Grey is
Editor-in-Chief of Rejuvenation Research, is
a Fellow of both the Gerontological Society of
America and the American Aging Association,
and sits on the editorial and scientic advisory
boards of numerous journals and organizations.
Alex Zhavoronkov PhD, is the Chief Science Of-
cer of the Biogerontology Research Founda-
tion, and the founder and CEO of Insilico Medi-
cine, a leader in applying advanced AI and deep
learning to ageing, drug discovery and biomark-
er discovery. He heads the laboratory of regen-
erative medicine at the Clinical Research Center
for Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immu-
nology where his research interests include skin
and cartilage regeneration and personalized
medicine in oncology. He is the author of many
scientic as well as popular papers and books
on aging research, including “The Ageless
Generation” published by Palgrave Macmillan.
Advisors
Alexey Moskalev, DSc is Head of the Laboratory
of Molecular Radiobiology and Gerontology at
the Institute of Biology of Komi Science Center
of the Ural division of the Russian Academy
of Sciences. He is also Professor at Syktyvkar
State University. Alex focuses on DNA repair
and molecular mechanisms of aging. He earned
his DSc in Biology at Syktyvkar State University.
João Pedro de Magalhães is a Reader in aging at
the University of Liverpool and a Trustee of the
Biogerontology Research Foundation. His lab at
the University of Liverpool studies aging through
both computational and experimental approach-
es. He helps maintain several databases on ag-
ing - among them - GenAge, AnAge, GenDR, the
Digital Aging Atlas, and Who’s Who in Geron-
tology. His research group helped sequence the
transcriptome of the long-lived bowhead whale.
David A. Sinclair, Ph.D. is a Professor in the
Department of Genetics and co-Director of the
Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging
at Harvard Medical School. He obtained his
Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics at the Universi-
ty of New South Wales, Sydney in 1995. He
worked as a postdoctoral researcher at M.I.T.
with Dr. Leonard Guarente where he co dis-
covered a cause of aging for yeast as well as
the role of Sir2 in epigenetic changes driven
by genome instability. He is also co-found-
er and co-chief editor of the journal Aging.
Advisors
Morten Scheibye-Knudsen is a professor
at the University of Copenhagen Center for
Healthy Ageing and research fellow at the Na-
tional Institute on Aging Laboratory of Mo-
lecular Gerontology (LMG), Baltimore, Unit-
ed States and has published extensively
on the subject of the aging brain, neurode-
generation, and mitochondrial dysfunction.
William Bains is an academic and entrepre-
neur. In 1999 William founded Amedis Phar-
maceuticals Ltd, (which was later acquired by
Paradigm Therapeutics). He has held teach-
ing positions at Cambridge University and the
Uiversity of Warwick. William continues to be
engaged in research at MIT, where he is a vis-
iting scientist researching astrobiology, and
as founder and CSO of Five Alarm Bio Ltd. He
is author of over 100 papers and four books.
John D. Furber is the CEO and founder of Leg-
endary Pharmaceuticals. He is an entrepreneur
and scientist who has been studying the biology
of aging and regeneration for more than 20 years.
He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Physics
and Mathematics from the University of Califor-
nia at Santa Cruz in 1975, and a Master of Science
degree in Biological Sciences from the Universi-
ty of California at Irvine in 1990. He is a frequent
contributor at meetings in the elds of aging,
mitochondria, autophagy, and oxidative stress.
Editors
Franco Cortese (Supervisor for Volume I) -
Biogerontology Research
Foundation
Dmitry Kaminskiy (Supervisor for Volume II) -
Deep Knowledge Life
Sciences
Contributors
Ian Inkster -
Biogerontology Research Foundation
Ilia Stambler -
International Longevity Alliance
Alexander Shynkarenko -
Aging Analytics Agency
Jane Schastnaya -
Deep Knowledge Life Sciences
Johnny Adams -
Gerontology Research Group
Sebastian Aguiar -
University of Amsterdam
Robert Young -
Gerontology Research Group
Giovanni Santostasi -
Northwestern University
Institutional Partners
Longevity Research Landscape Overview 2017
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Executive Summary
Part I
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Executive Summary
I see a storm coming. [Unfunded
pension and medical liabilities are]
the least sustainable situation I
have seen in my career.
– Stanley Druckenmiller, of Duquesne Capital and
formerly the Quantum Fund of Soros Fund Management,
to Bloomberg March 1, 2016
Executive Summary
The list of major global hazards in the next century has grown long and familiar. It
includes the proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, other types
of high-tech terrorism, deadly superviruses, extreme climate change, the nan-
cial, economic, and political aftershocks of globalization, and the violent eth-
nic explosions waiting to be detonated in today’s unsteady new democracies.
The greatest problem threatening global economic prosperity and social stabili-
ty is demographic aging. Declining birthrates and increased lifespan are increas-
ing population dependency ratios (working tax payers versus the elderly support-
ed by taxes), placing a growing burden on already tenuous government budgets.
The Silver Tsunami, aptly, will hit Japan rst, which already has the worst dependency
ratio in the world and also the highest debt to GDP ratio of the OECD. China’s work-
force began shrinking in 2015, and China’s 65+ population will double to 200 million
by 2030.
2
The United States has trillions in unfunded pension and healthcare liabilities
expected to expand as the Baby Boomers retire en masse over the next decade.
3
Yet there is a less-
understood challenge
- the graying of the
developed world’s
population - that may
actually do more to
reshape our collective
future than any of the
above.
Former US Secretary of Commerce
Co-Founder of the Blackstone Group
Fmr. Deputy Chairman Federal Reserve Bank of
New York
Chairman emeritus of the Council on Foreign
Relations
Author of Gray Dawn: How the Coming Age
Wave Will Transform America-and the World
– Peter G. Peterson, in Foreign Affairs(1999)
1
1. Peterson, P. (1999) Grey Dawn: The Global Aging Crisis. Foreign Affairs.
2. UN World Population Prospects 2016, Stanford University Center on Longevity.
3. Zhavoronkov A, Debonneuil E, Mizra, N, Artuhov, I. (2012) Evaluating the impact of recent advances in
biomedical sciences and the possible mortality decreases on the future of health care and Social Security
in the United States. Pensions. doi:10.1057/pm.2012.28
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Executive Summary
The current retirement age (OECD average of 64 years) was established prior to the
rapid rise in life expectancy that occurred in the second half of the 20th century. Gov-
ernment and private sector pension schemes have not adjusted their actuarial ta-
bles to account for gains in life expectancy due to modern medicine (longevity risk).
The rate of medical advancement is accelerating. This underestimation of rising
life expectancy is a mistake worth many trillions of dollars
4
. Failure to meet pen-
sion obligations would result in rising poverty among elderly, higher taxes, ina-
tion and political instability.
5
The post-war boom cohort is living longer but expe-
riences an extended period of chronic disease in the years prior to death. The
system of sick care is costly, particularly for diseases lacking any disease-modi-
fying treatment, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Due to the exponentially rising risk
of disease as a function of age, curing any individual disease like cardiovascular
disease or cancer only increases a population’s healthy lifespan by 2-3 years be-
fore another age-related disease (diabetes, stroke, pulmonary disease) strikes.
The aim of geroscience and regenerative medicine is not for us to live longer in a sick,
disabled state, but to prevent and delay the occurrence of age-related disease. An in-
dividual’s nal few years of chronic illness are their costliest to the healthcare system.
The goal of the US National Institutes on Aging is the compression of morbidity – to
extend years of healthy life. The only sustainable solution is to extend healthy lifespan
(healthspan). This will require the use of geroprotective drugs, stem cells, and pro-
gressively complex genetic therapy to mimic the salutary mutations enjoyed by rare
4. Debonneuil E, Planchet F, Loisel S. (2015) Do actuaries believe in longevity deceleration?
HAL Archives. hal-01219270
5. 2 Kotlikoff L, Burns S. (2004) The Coming Generational Storm. The MIT Press.
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Figure 1: Working in retirement is becoming the new normal (TheMarketSurge)
4
Executive Summary
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Executive Summary
supercentenarians (who bear saluary mutations that delay or stop the onset of age related
diseases – they are healthy past 100 years of age despite suboptimal diet and lifestyle).
6,7
Clearly it would be desirable to add life to our years rather than merely years to
our lives. But few are aware that health span extension is becoming routine in the
laboratory. Scientic breakthroughs have demonstrated up to 30% increased
healthspan extension in mice,
8
and much more in non-mammalian model or-
ganisms by various pharmacological, environmental and genetic interventions.
6. Collins F. (2014) Secrets of a Supercentenarian’s Genome. NIH Director’s Blog.
7. Barzilai N, Shuldiner A. (2000) Searching for Human Longevity Genes The Future History
of Gerontology in the Post-genomic Era. The Journal of Gerontology.
8. Baker D. (2016) Naturally occurring p16Ink4a-positive cells shorten healthy lifespan.
Nature.
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Figure 3: Naturally occurring p16 Ink4a-positive cells shorten healthy lifespan
(Darren J. Baker et al., 2016, Nature)
Figure 2: Medical research: Treat ageing
(Luigi Fontana et al., 2016, Nature)
6
Executive Summary
Even though it has been known for a century that caloric and dietary restriction increases
healthspan in model organisms, aging was once thought too complex to be tractable by
mainstream science. The eld was, and remains, held back by charlatans engaged in fraud.
In recent years, scientists have elucidated the fundamental mechanisms or hall-
marks of aging, opening the eld of geroscience the understanding and ma-
nipulation of the fundamental biological processes in age-related disease.
The War on Aging received reinforcements in recent years from
Google’s company Calico and J. Craig Venter’s Human Longevi-
ty Inc., both boasting considerable intellectual and nancial resources.
In late 2016, Unity Biotechnology (a company developing drugs shown to slow
aging by eliminating damaged, senescent cells) raised over $116M from ven-
ture investors including Jeff Bezos, VenRock and ARCH Venture Partners.
The US National Institutes on Aging have also received budget increases as
part of a new Alzheimer’s Disease initiative, but of the vast majority of “aging re-
search,” less than 0.32%
9
of the US NIH budget goes to fundamental mecha-
nisms of aging – the knowledge necessary to slow aging itself and all of its atten-
dant diseases. This is already possible in model organisms and translation to
humans is underway but desperately underfunded relative to its importance.
The longevity industry trend is just the beginning. Combining gerosci-
ence with rapid advances in stem cell and gene therapies, the biop-
harmaceutical industry can expect major disruption to the current mod-
el of palliative chronic disease management as more true cures emerge.
10
9. US National Institutes on Aging. Fiscal Year 2017 Budget. $183.1M for “Aging Biology”
out of $32B NIH Budget.
10. Zhavoronkov A. (2013) The Ageless Generation: How Advances in Biomedicine Will
Transform the Global Economy. St. Marten’s Press.
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Executive Summary
Figure 4: The Hallmarks of Aging (Lopez-Otin et al. 2013, Cell)
My lab is not concerned with diseases of
aging, which are eects rather than causes;
it’s trying to get at the causes of aging and
reverse them. And there are a fair number
of precedents for this in animals, but the
idea is to get it transferred to humans.
Some examples of this are if you take
blood from a young mouse and exchange
it with an old mouse. The small molecules,
macromolecules, and cells in the blood
result in a variety of biomarkers of
aging being reversed. You can aect the
vasculature, the blood vessels, the nerves,
skeletal and cardiac muscles, and there are
measures of these that indicate that it’s not
just prolonging a very aged state or going
for longevity; you’re actually reversing it.”
– Dr. George M. Church, Professor of Genetics at Harvard,
author of Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent
Nature and Ourselves
Despite the optimistic outlook for geroscience, it is unlikely that, at the current pace of
funding and awareness, meaningful health span extensions will be available in time to
avert the impending crisis of demographic aging. It is critical for investors, policymak-
ers, scientists, NGOs and inuential entities to prioritize the amelioration of the geriatric
world scenario and recognize aging as a critical matter of global economic security.
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Executive Summary
Longevity Research Landscape Overview 2017
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Geroscience Research
Landscape Overview
2017
Part II
Glossary of Terms.......................................................................................11
Chapter 1: The Silver Tsunami..................................................................12
Global aging population, baby boomer purchasing power, Japan, the
way forward
Chapter 2: A History of Modern Geroscience..........................................18
The ultimate mystery, early insights, early interventions, the road to
rejuvenation
Chapter 3: Major Trends in Geroscience..................................................22
Public and professional perception, an ‘anti-aging movement’,
institutions and expertise, media coverage, key moments from the last
decade, increasing insight into oxidative stress, increasing insight into the
genetic basis of aging, the state of progress
Chapter 4: The Convergence of Regenerative Medicine, P3 Medicine,
and Geroscience.............................................................................34
Introducing regenerative medicine and P3 medicine
Chapter 5: Fast and Accurate: AI-powered biotech................................46
Theroleofarticialintelligenceandmachinelearninginprecision
medicine, investment and marketing
Chapter 6: Major Roadblocks & The Road Ahead...................................53
Inertia created by moral ambivalence around aging
Conclusion. The Rate of Progress............................................................56
Bibliography and References....................................................................59
Part II: Geroscience Research Landscape Overview 2017
Table of contents
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Table of contents
Glossary of Terms
Geroscience Umbrella term for the interdisciplinary eld that aims to understand
the relationship between aging and age-related diseases and the prospects for
biomedical intervention. A great many molecular biologists, neuroscientists, protein
chemists, cell biologists, geneticists, endocrinologists, pharmacologists, and even
mathematicians intersect with this eld.
Geriatrics Branch of medicine dealing with particular diseases and debilities of
aging directly, and the care of aged persons.
Gerontology Study of aging in general, including all social, cultural, psychological,
cognitive, and biological aspects.
Biogerontology Sub-eld of gerontology concerned with the biological
aging process, its evolutionary origins, and potential means of intervention.
Involves interdisciplinary research on biological aging causes, effects, and
mechanisms.
Biomedical gerontology Collective name for attempts to intervene in
the biological aging process, acting directly from knowledge gained from
biogerontology research.
Regenerative medicine Branch of translational research dealing with the repair
of damaged tissues and organs using tissue engineering and molecular biology to
restore normal function.
Rejuvenation biotechnology The application of regenerative medicine to
age-damage, reversing its accumulation. applied relative of geroscience. This
discipline aims to prevent and repair the funda- mental damage that causes aging.
This damage can include: somatic DNA damage, telomere attrition, transposon-
related genomic instabil- ity, reduced autophagy and protein turnover, epigenetic
drift, stem cell exhaustion, advanced glycation endproducts, and more.
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Glossary of terms
The Silver Tsunami
“The scourge of a greying population is only a scourge if it is depicted as such»
- Douglas Murray
Figure 5: The Economist’s Depiction of the Future [33]
Infectious disease is not the mystery it once was, and is now largely under biomedical
control. The war on human illness has evolved from an invasion into a counter-insur-
gency operation.
With all our old foes dispatched, the future of late life is old age. Those stubborn illness-
es inicted from within -- cancer, Alzheimer’s, arthritis, osteoporosis, not to mention
more subtle defects such as progressive hearing loss and cognitive decline -- are bio-
medicine’s next and perhaps nal challenge.
The phrase “Silver Tsunami” has been used in mainstream publications to describe this
coming future. It came up recently in Forbes[1] to describe rapid population[2] aging
and has been used by medical journals and professional organisations such the Amer-
ican Psychological Association[3] to describe the impact on health and the economy.
This coming tsunami will be a global deluge. All but 18 of the world’s countries have
an ageing population and rising life expectancy, according to the UN[4]. As the world’s
population increases, a greater percentage of it is being claimed by the elderly, and it is
predicted that by 2050 over 16% of it will be over 65, compared to under 6% only 100
years earlier in 1950[5].
An ageing population is sustained by two factors: an increased life expectancy and
decreased fertility. Life expectancy has grown steadily over time. In 1840 the average
female reported life span was 45 years; in 2009 it was 87[6].
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Figure 6: Global aging population [89]
This steady increase can be attributed to medical breakthroughs throughout this period,
most importantly vaccines developed to counter major diseases and greater general
knowledge concerning nutrition.
‘Total fertility rate’ is dened by the OECD as as “the total number of children that would
be born to each woman if she were to live to the end of her childbearing years and give
birth to children in alignment with the prevailing age-specic fertility rates”[31]. The
global average of this has dropped from 2.8 children per woman in 1940 to 1.7 recently
in 2014, meaning most women are now only having 1 or 2 children[7]. While some pop-
ulations have had uctuations in their fertility, the overall trend has been a decrease.
For example, the United States experienced a signicant increase in fertility post-World
war II, from around 1946 to 1964, in an event often termed the “baby boom”. This saw
fertility rates rise above 2 children per woman[8], something that had not occurred
since before 1927[9]; resulting in an estimated 78.3 million Americans born during this
period[10]. The subsequent decline is due to many factors, mainly social changes over
subsequent decades such as young women working and waiting until the 1970s to start
families[11].
A woman’s fertility is said to peak in the early 20s and drop around 35[12], yet in many
developing countries women are having their rst child around age 30[13], when it is
harder to conceive, so for many women it becomes too late to bear children. Indeed
28.9% of American women between the ages of 30-34 have had no children at all ac-
cording to a 2014 survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau[14].
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The Silver Tsunami
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The Silver Tsunami
As the economy has grown in America and other parts of the developed world, the main
cause of death changed from infectious disease to chronic, non-communicable diseas-
es such as heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, cerebrovascular
disease and Alzheimer’s. Unfortunately, while admirable progress has been made in
respect to lifespan, many more people are consequently living with chronic, incurable
conditions.
While often considered a problem of ‘developed’ nations, in fact these challenges are-
common to many countries with a wide range of wealth; in particular BRIC nations
such as China and India, which are both predicted to experience a massive increase
in their elderly population. Experts agree that this wider ‘age shift’ is being driven as
aspiring countries converge with the wealthiest in regards to nutrition, public health,
and better education, rather than by disruptive technologies directly extending the life
span of individuals.
Baby Boomer Purchasing Power
The Baby Boomer generation, born after WWII, is a very large population cohort that is
currently beginning to retire en masse. The oldest Boomers turned 65, US retirement
age, beginning in 2011. They are also the wealthiest generation in history (holding 45-
50% of all household wealth) - investor recognition of this purchasing power should in-
centivize the development of effective rejuvenation therapy to cater to the Baby Boom-
ers. However, as biomedical research usually requires a lot of time before therapies
are readily available, we must aim to accelerate the translation of basic research into
treatments and medicines. Doing so will allow the Baby Boomers to benet in time to
avert major economic consequences.
Figure7:Thebabyboomernancialpsychology
http://www.mybudget360.com/psychologically-damaged-baby-boomers-wealth-
retirement-funds-amount/
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The Silver Tsunami
Figure 8: Japan’s Aging Population [32]
Japan
A plain example of an aging population is Japan, and as its problems grow plainer, it
could be seen as our canary down the mine. It has both high longevity and low fertility.
The life expectancy is 81.7 years for men and 88.5 years for women[15}, owing to adept
medical care and technologies, as well as the healthy diet and nutrition in the avail-
able to the Japanese people. But declining fertility is the main cause of this population
ageing, with the total fertility rate being 1.41 children per woman in 2016[15], and even
reaching an all time low of 1.26 in 2005[16]. There are many contributing factors to this,
one being that most of the population is urban: 94.5% (as of 2017)[17] with around 25%
of the population residing in the greater Tokyo area[18] and around 11% in the Tokyo
prefecture alone[19], giving it a population density of 6,150 persons per square kilome-
tre (2015)[19]. Due to being such a densely populated city many residences are very
small in order to accommodate the population; with an average of 1.91 persons per
household (2015)[19]. Combine this with the busy working life of a vast number of To-
kyo citizens and there is not much space or time to focus on starting a family, and many
men nd themselves uninterested in getting married. Surveys on single Japanese men
conducted in 2010: it found that 61% of men in their 20s and 70% in their 30s deemed
themselves “herbivores”[20], a term used to describe men with no interest in intimate
relationships with women[21]. The Japanese government believes this is contributing
to the country’s declining fertility[22].
Japan’s aging bachelor population [76]
This ageing of Japan is changing the country in numerous ways, such as increasing
the cost of care for the elderly. More nursing centres and adult day-cares are being
constructed, forcing 400 primary and secondary schools per year to close due to the
dwindling number of children and the need for some to be converted into adult care
centres[24]. More nursing homes have increased the demand for care workers, with
6,000 centres caring for 420,000 elderly people.
This has caused the national budget to increase. In the early 1970s, only 6% of the
country’s budget went towards social welfare aspects; in 1992 it jumped to 18% and is
projected to be 28% by 2028[25], diverting funds from other important areas such as
education. Less young people means less able-bodied people in the work force. Many
industries are burdened with irreplaceable ageing workers. This caused a number of
companies to raise the mandatory retirement age from 55 to 60 or 65 in the 1980s
and 1990s, with retired workers recently receiving permission to continue working after
ofcial retirement[25]; so as to avoid strain on the national pension system. This has
incentivised many retirement age workers to continue working, in order to stay out of
poverty brought nearer by the 1986 raise in the ages of entitlement to various state ben-
ets[25]. This number will continue to increase if Japan cannot replenish its workforce,
forecast in 2002 to drop by 18% by 2030[26], which unless countered leads inevitably
to a shrinking economy[27].
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The Silver Tsunami
The Japanese government have responded with policies to incentivise childbirth and
keep more of its population in the workforce[28], such as benets for people with chil-
dren and more time and opportunities for childcare [23]. The Child Care and Family
Care Leave Law for example, implemented in 2010, allows for a more lenient work
schedule for those with children[29], by enabling new parents to take up to one year’s
leave after the birth of a child, and also allowing an extra six months off if the child
isn’t accepted into nursery. It also provides allowances and benets to employees with
preschool-aged children, such as up to ve days leave if a child is sick or injured[30].
This law aims to improve female employment rate, decrease the percentage of those
working 60 hours or more a week, increase the use of annual paid leave, increase the
rate of child care leave for both men and women and also increase the hours spent by
men on childcare and housework in households with one child under the age of six; all
over a period of 10 years[29].
Government initiatives such as these are currently the only means available to us for
withstanding the tsunami. Any more drastic response to population growth, such as a
misguided attempt to curtail birth rates, would result in even fewer young people and
reduce the quality of life for the elderly.
Ultimately it is we who will decide how population growth impacts the world.
This report seeks to offer a brief overview of the biomedical means of taking control of
this situation.
17
The Silver Tsunami
A History of Modern Geroscience
The diseases and debilities of aging were described in the previous section as ‘stub-
born’. This is an understatement. They are distinguished from other types of disease
and debility by the fact that they are inicted from within by essential metabolic pro-
cesses, and are therefore as much an eventuality of these processes as starvation is
of fasting. Unlike Cholera for example, there is a 100% chance that Alzheimer’s will kill
you as you age if nothing else does rst.
Geriatric medicine, the branch of medicine dealing with the individual diseases of old
age in aged persons, is therefore ghting a losing battle. Further progress will require
more profound interventions, and ultimately the full might of an entirely new industry.
The ultimate mystery
The longevity industry described herein comprises several very different technologies,
and has undergone multiple direction changes over the past century. The rst docu-
mented quest for a redress to human aging was in the Epic of Gilgamesh (circa 2500
B.C.) in which the fabled Mesopotamian king sought a divine herb conferring immortali-
ty. Since then aging has gone from being the ultimate mystery of nature to biomedicine’s
ultimate adversary, and multiple disparate approaches to aging have emerged ranging
from purely academic geroscience to technologically motivated biomedical research
and engineering. In recent years their paths have intersected, creating new synergies
and resulting in the unique industry landscape described herein.
The Fountain of Youth, Hieronymus Bosch
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19
A History of Modern Geroscience
Early insight
By the beginning of the 20th century, the biology of aging was still largely opaque.
Various vague theories had surfaced, ranging from vitalism, the belief in a depleting life
force, to simple notions of wear and tear, but nothing concrete. The full light of science
was not thrown on the biology of aging until the the middle of the 20th century. The
discovery of DNA in the 1950s opened up new lines of enquiry into the genetic basis of
aging. Scientic articles written since the 1960s on the pathogenic role of free radicals
and the role of telomere shortening in chronic diseases made these into household
terms, and decades of research into human and animal metabolism opened up new
elds of speculation and theorising on the causes of aging.
1960s: Early research into DNA [68]
By the end of the 20th century, biogerontology, the study of biological aging, and gero-
science, the interdisciplinary eld that aims to understand the relationship between
aging and age-related diseases, had come into their own.
Early interventions
The 20th century had been a century of physics. These early insights laid the ground-
work for a century of biology. The rst decade of the 21st century rapidly threw up
various proposals for biomedical intervention based on early conclusions reached by
the emerging biological science of aging which had become known as ‘biogerontolo-
gy’. For example laboratory research into the metabolisms of organisms ranging from
nematodes to rats revealed that a sharp reduction in caloric intake sharply slowed
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A History of Modern Geroscience
down aging, and so lengthy calorie restriction trials on primates were commenced with
a view to articially bottling the metabolic effects of this dietary alteration. But despite
the undeniable promise of these biogerontological attempts to extend life, as knowl-
edge of genetics and metabolism grew, the challenges of bringing aging under serious
biomedical control grew plainer. It quickly became apparent that human genetics and
human metabolism were an irreducibly complex tangle with aging as its inextricable
consequence. Radically extending lifespan by taming metabolism would be like solving
a Rubik’s cube with a thousand sides.
Road to rejuvenation
In the second decade of the 21st century, just when we thought we knew the probable
limits of successful intervention, the industry underwent a revolution in thinking when
biogerontology began to intersect with regenerative medicine, an umbrella term for
therapies which restore or regrow damaged tissue, from tissue engineering to stem cell
and gene therapies. Technologists coming into biogerontology from other industries be-
gan to notice that biogerontology’s ndings could be used to fashion a damage report
which could then be handed over to to regenerative medicine.
In the eyes of regenerative medicine, there is an overlap between accidental injury and
age-related pathology. For example in 2010 scientists from Keele University in the UK
began trials for a stem-cell therapy for repairing osteoarthritic knee-joints, partly a result
of mechanical stress, but sometimes unavoidable for people in late life. It is a facet of
old age, but one which falls within the purview of regenerative medicine.
This prospective application of regenerative medicine to the conditions of old age —
Fifty years of aging research [77]
through methods such as removal of unwanted matter from in and between cells with
implications for conditions ranging from macular degeneration to immune system de-
cline -- is termed ‘rejuvenation biotechnology’. By simply seeking to repair aged tissue
and avoiding the need for decoding genomes and mapping metabolisms, rejuvenation
biotechnology sets the longevity industry on a very potent course indeed.
The twentieth century gave us biogerontology, an innovative approach to the problems
identied by geriatric medicine, and the twenty-rst century is in the process of produc-
ing rejuvenation biotechnology, an innovative approach to the damages identied by
biogerontology.
The next section will take a closer look at further innovations as well as various con-
verging trends technological, social and political, presently setting the future course of
the industry.
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A History of Modern Geroscience
Why We Age - Science Magazine Cover
(Dec 2015)
Major Trends in Geroscience
Public and professional perception
Perhaps the most manifest development in the longevity industry has been public
awareness, a fact which in a democracy has clear political and practical ramications.
Throughout the 20th century, life extension as a biomedical aspiration went from be-
ing an academic backwater with vague connotations of Victorian crankishness, to an
ill-dened and remote technological prospect of which only a few were dimly aware, to
a technological revolution as abrupt and disruptive as the digital, with a clear presence
in mainstream culture and ethically-motivated popular movement behind it.
It may seem hard to remember now, but prior to the 1990s not even the notion of DNA
had fully penetrated public awareness, let alone any clear notion of the mechanisms of
aging. Cancer had long been correctly imagined as an unwanted growth which every-
one wanted a way to get rid of. Whereas aging was...what? Nobody told us. Little won-
der then, that there was little public pressure to do anything about it, whatever ‘it’ was.
In the 1990s, terminology related to the biology of aging such as ‘telomere’ and ‘free
radical’ sept into everyday vocabulary. TV documentaries and magazines made scien-
tically sound illustrations of the aging process widely available. These provided the
public with the images they needed to envision the problem and the words they needed
to demands solution.
And moreover these terms implied that aging was something tractable, at least in prin-
ciple. Aging became imaginable and therefore vanquishable.
Yet there remained a conspiracy of silence over the possible mutability of aging. Or
rather an inertia, brought about by the lack of any professional prognostication on the
prospects of longer lifespans.
An ‘anti-aging movement’
This changed somewhat in the mid-00s when technologists such as the inventor and fu-
turist Ray Kurzweil and software engineer-turned-biogerontological theorist Dr, Aubrey
de Grey began to notice the latent potential of nascent regenerative medical technolo-
gies, and set imaginations in motion with their visions of what they saw as biomedicine’s
limitless potential to increase lifespan. De Grey in particular became known for what he
called his, ‘engineering approach’ to aging, and his prediction that the rst person to live
to age 1000 had already been born (as of about 2005). This brazen forecast drew op-
position from fellow biogerontologists, who feared that such careless pronouncements
would drag the eld back to the backwater from which it had just clawed its way out.
But de Grey was speaking in his capacity as a technologist making a call to action
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rather than a scientic theorist pushing a hypothesis. It was a conditional statement to
the effect of: “If, and only if, there is a concerted global effort to apply the regenerative
medical toolkit to repair the human body faster than it accumulates damage, the sky’s
the limit.”
A contestable statement to be sure, but as a complete regenerative medicine approach
to aging was an unprecedented proposal at the time, there was no such thing as re-
ceived wisdom one way or the other on the expectable longevity benets, not even
down to a particular order of magnitude. It received diverse responses ranging from
outright derision to wholehearted popular and professional enthusiasm. But the overall
effect of the controversy was that received wisdom came to regard the near-future of
human lifespans as a wide open question.
In retrospect, de Grey would be seen the father of ‘rejuvenation biotechnology’ now
the established term for the application of regenerative medicine to age, named after a
seminal annual industry conference held every year in the San Francisco area. In the
past decade the core concept of rejuvenation biotechnology has given a fresh sense of
direction to a nexus of institutions with regenerative medical expertise, all lending their
efforts to this overarching objective.
Institutions and expertise
See Part 4 : Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
An early focal point for this agenda was the SENS Research Foundation (or SRF,
‘SENS’ standing for Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) in Mountain
View California, the world’s rst biomedical research charity dedicated exclusively to
the repair and restoration of aged tissues, and the host of the seminal Rejuvenation
Biotechnology industry conference series. It was co-founded in 2009 by de Grey in a
pragmatic split from the Methuselah Foundation, an earlier biomedical research foun-
dation with a broader remit, with initial capital from venture capitalist Peter Thiel. It
specically subdivided its efforts into seven projects, each focusing on an particular
category of age-damage, with names such as ‘LysoSENS’ (removing waste from the
cell’s lysosome), or AmyloSENS (removing waste such as amyloid from between cells),
and so on.
At about this time the think-tank and business incubator Singularity University was
established by Peter Diamandis and Ray Kurzweil at NASA retail park, with a focus on
‘exponential technologies’, of the life extending variety in particular. In 2013 Google
and Arthur D. Levinson launched Calico with a mission statement echoing that of SRF,
but a broader remit of “health, wellbeing and longevity”, and in partnership with the
pharmaceutical company AbbVie, founded the same year, set up a R&D facility focused
on aging and age-related inrmity such as neurodegeneration and cancer.
As the edgling rejuvenation biotechnology industry took ight it drew interest and co-
operation from luminaries in diverse elds. No scientic or industry conference was
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Major Trends in Geroscience
complete without the presence of molecular geneticists such as George Church, re-
generative medical technologists such as Tony Atala, molecular oncologists such as
Maria Blasco, ethical philosophers such as Peter Singer or celebrity endorsers such
as Edward James Olmos.
See Part 9: Top 100 Geroscientists
Around this Silicon Valley-based hub an international community of institutions formed
like spokes. The industry relied on the labour of research facilities throughout the
West from the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine(WFIRM), Rice
University, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Stanford University, to Brit-
ain’s Oxford and Cambridge Universities.
Such a hodgepodge of expertise and approaches was always going to be nec-
essary in the treatment of aging, for aging itself is a hodgepodge of metabolic pro-
cesses, damages and pathologies with multiple points of possible intervention,
and the road ahead therefore presents us with a great many potential false av-
enues. But there are already emerging attempts to navigate those avenues ef-
fectively and orchestrate research internationally, such as the use of articial-
ly intelligent investment system to derisk global investment for maximum progress.
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Major Trends in Geroscience
Media coverage
By this point the prospect of radical life extension was already gripping the main-
stream media.
Since the mid-’00s, radical life extension has been an increasingly common subject of
books, TV documentaries, lms and talks. After Kurzweil broke some the ice with his
2005 book Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever, Aubrey de Grey
began to appear on prime time discussion shows such as BBC’s Hardtalk, Chan-
nel 4’s Richard and Judy, CBC News, and even The Colbert Report (to discuss
his 2007 work Ending Aging) and documentary lms such Mark Wexler’s How to
Live Forever the the Christopher Sykes documentary Do You Want to Live Forever.
See. Part 8: Top 100 Longevity Books
Longevity science and technology news has saturated popular online culture and is
a major subject of TED talks and debates including one very major ‘Debate of the
Ages at Oxford’s Sheldonian Theatre in 2012.
An increased public consciousness of the prospect of a technological redress to
aging may even have inuenced ction. The 2011 dystopian lm In Time, about a
near-future post-aging world, appeared to rely on this public consciousness of it when
it offered remarkably little explanatory prolog to explain how that world came about. It
consisted of the single line “ I don’t have time to explain how it happened. It is what it
is. We’re genetically engineered to stop aging at 25. “
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Major Trends in Geroscience
Key moments from the last decade
2010 Public interest in longevity has risen over the preceding decade. Pe-
ter Thiel, having already supported biogerontology research around
the world, is showing an interest in rejuvenation biotechnologies: “If
you have radical life extension, that could obviously lead to reper-
cussions for society. But I think that’s a problem we want to have.”
says the businessman. The SENS Research Foundation is a regu-
lar recipient of his donations. The entrepreneur James Hope also
gave $500.000 to SRF. In the same year SRF’s yearly budget has
now reached $1M, allowing them to open an independent laboratory.
An experiment in rejuvenation transplantation is conducted. It
shows a neonatal thymus grafted to old mice to signicantly re-
duce mortality rate, while restoring immune system function, most
likely due to depleting number of T-cells in elderly organisms. The
resulting paper sparks further interest in tissue engineering.[34]
2011 SRF continues to expand its efforts. After Aubrey de Grey donates most of
his net worth to the Foundation it is nally able to simultaneously operate in all
seven of SENS research branches, two years after the foundation of SRF.
Scientists at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine conduct an exper-
iment on the clearance of senescent cells. The study proves the hy-
pothesis that senescent cells play a large role in age-related decline
by negatively affecting adjacent cells, provoking inammation. [35]
2012 The most prevalent trend of the year is the commercialization of emerging
longevity technologies. Gensight Biologics and Covalent Bioscience are
founded, building on the Methuselah Foundation’s technology in mitochon-
drial and neurodegenerative dysfunctions and SRF’s catabody research.
2013 Alphabet launches its own biogerontology company known as Calico.
This move gains yet unseen mainstream attention and has
signicantly increases public knowledge of the industry.
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Major Trends in Geroscience
Probably the most important year in the industry from the pub-
lic outreach point of view. The landmark publication titled ‘The Hall-
marks of Aging’ is published in Cell. The team of Carlos López-Otín
has shown a new framework of aging research that serves as an
alternative to SENS, providing a more holistic approach to aging,
connecting different hallmarks hierarchically. To this day The Hall-
marks of Aging remains the most cited biogerontology article [36]
The Methuselah Foundation continues to focus on tissue engi-
neering. After launching the New Organ initiative and support-
ing organ engineering company Organovo in the previous years,
the Foundation announces $1 million prize for a tissue engi-
neered liver. The competitors must create a working liver from
the patient’s own cells. The call is active until the end of 2018. [37]
2014 The Buck Institute for Research on Aging has launched their own ver-
sion of longevity research framework, known as the ‘Seven Pillars of
Aging’. This framework bears similarities to the SENS ‘seven damag-
es’ approach and serves as a practical roadmap for life extension. [38]
SRF reaches a breakthrough with its catabody technologies. Misfolded
proteins form amyloids responsible for declining tissue function and
increased death rates. The Foundation’s catabodies prove capable
of destroying a transthyretin amyloid, a particularly prevalent variety.
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Major Trends in Geroscience
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2015 The rst senolytic drug candidates are introduced by the sci-
entists of Mayo Clinic. These drugs, dasanitib and querce-
tin are capable of removing senescent cells, while leaving oth-
er cells unharmed. Senolytics are now a prospective drug group
that can successfully combat one of the hallmarks of aging [39]
SRF is now focusing on the anti-cancer telomere research. They
conduct experiments both on telomerase blocking and alternative
lengthening of telomeres (ALT) technologies. Meanwhile, trans-
thyretin amyloid technologies are on their way to commercialization.
2016 Senolytic research is rapidly developing. Scientists from across
the globe are actively nding evidence that removal of senescent
cells improve respiratory, cardiovascular and immune functions.
SENS Research Foundation launches a crowdfunding campaign
as a part of the OncoSENS branch of their research program. The
crowdfunding aims to further the ALT research. SRF states that the
most effective way of ghting cancer is to strike at something that
all cancers have in common: perpetual lengthening of telomeres.
The Methuselah Foundation, now in collaboration with NASA, launch
another prize. The $500.000 will be given to the group that will be able
to produce thick vascular tissue [40]
2017 More than 10 different senolytic drug candidates are now be-
ing developed by both non- and for-prot facilities. Various orga-
nizations are racing to present the rst true anti-aging medication.
The Methuselah Foundation founds The Methuselah fund in order to
assist emerging longevity-related companies in their earlier stages of
development. [41]
Increasing insight into the genetic basis of aging
The genetics of aging and longevity remains a poorly understood topic, given the com-
plexity of gene interactions and the usual lack of any signicant effect associated with
the expression of a single gene.
Current studies of longevity genetics usually focus on long-living populations to identify
DNA sequences which correlate with longer lifespan.
A number of such studies have shown that a group of genes that encode forkhead box
proteins (O subclass, to be specic) exist in many centenarians in various populations
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Major Trends in Geroscience
across the world. One such protein, FOXO3 has been found to induce apoptosis (the
form of regulated cell death that hampers cellular senescence, a facet of aging), while
FOXO4 is linked to various processes, including apoptosis regulation and oxidative
stress pathways [80].
At this point studies diverge along two different paths with one being signicantly more
effective. The more obvious one involves discovering ways of expressing those genes.
This is however a cost-inefcient approach, as the processes associated with FOXO
genes happen across the organism, which makes them a hard target for somatic gene
therapy. A more efcient approach is the study the molecular mechanisms that these
proteins use to increase lifespan. This research will enable the design of pharmaceuti-
cals that can emulate the proteins efciently without the need for genetic intervention.
Increasing insight into oxidative stress
Oxidative stress is an aspect of aging that greatly harms the organism in the long run.
As it is directly linked to mitochondrial function, combating mitochondrial dysfunction is
considered a priority in longevity research, but has proven difcult.
In some cases it is easier and more effective to kill old mitochondria and recycle them in
order to create new ones. This can be achieved by a special form of autophagy, known
as mitophagy.
Recent studies are showing that mitophagy properties decline with age, and that active
mitophagy greatly improves healthspan, suggesting that possible interventions could
extend lifespan [81]. The next thing to do in this sub-eld is to determine the most
effective way of utilizing mitophagy mechanisms.
Increasing insight into environmental factors
The inuence of environment on lifespan is an often omitted part of biogerontology
research. While concentrating on developing novel means of extending lifespan,
longevity scientists tend to overlook the impact that factors such as chemical pollution
and radiation can have on life expectancy.
As China remains the most polluted region on Earth, it is an apt model for estimating
the effect of pollution on lifespan. Recent studies show [82] that living in highly polluted
areas, such as China’s Huai River region decreases median life expectancy by 3 years.
Moreover, they show that bringing the air policy in line with the WHO’s Class I standards
will bring almost 4 billion life-years to the populous as a whole.
Although not beyond dispute, there appears to be a simple correlation between the
level of pollution and median wealth in the populace, and it is hard to deny the harmful
effects that the negligence in the environmental protection will bring. As environmental
studies and biogerontology don’t have many intersections currently, it is hard to estimate
the potential of any such future interdisciplinary research, but there is no doubt that
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improving living conditions will extend lifespan and, more importantly, healthspan.
Further progress to watch
As stated previously, the technological threads comprising this industry are extremely
diverse and can approximately divided into the following strands:
Geroprotective drugs include small molecules, peptides, and proteins. Studies have
identied over 1,000 compounds which extend the lifespan of at least one model organ-
ism. These include antioxidants, anti-inammatory, anti-glycation, anti-amyloidogene-
sis, inhibitors of growth signaling, chelators, sirtuin activators, calorie restriction mimet-
ics, and many more. Regenerative medicine involves the use of stem cells from various
origins to rebuild, “regenerate” or improve the function of damaged organs and tissues.
Clinical translation in this area has been simplied greatly by the fact that many labs
have been repurposing old drugs for longevity (examples include rapamycin, metformin,
aspirin). So since these drugs have already been approved for human use, they need
not undergo phase 1 trials a second time.
Regenerative medicine involves the use of stem cells from various origins to rebuild,
“regenerate” or improve the function of damaged organs and tissues.
This can be promising for combating the degenerative pathologies of aging. Entire “re-
placement organs and tissues” can be grown outside of the body, using methods such
as growing tissues on biodegradable scaffolds, 3D tissue printing.
An important recent development has been the induction of regeneration within the
body by pharmacological means, e.g. using inhibitors of prostaglandin breakdown thus
promoting cell proliferation.
Nanotechnology, in medicine, is limited mainly to the treatment of cancer with
nanoparticles.
But recent interventions into aging have also reached the “nano” level. Some involve
Geroprotectors [84]
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Major Trends in Geroscience
nanoparticles such as Buckminsterfullerene or “bucky-ball” C60, believed to have
antiviral, antioxidant, anti-amyloid, immune stimulating and other therapeutic effects,
with reports of extended lifespans in mice.
Early operating medical nanodevices have even been announced, mainly intended to
assist with precise drug delivery, acting as prototypes of articial immune cells. These
nanodevices are mainly intended to eliminate cancer cells, but could also be used to
eliminate other types of problem cells such as senescent cells. In another area of
development, oxygenated micro-particles hold some promise for healthspan extension,
especially in critical conditions where oxygen deprivation is the ultimate cause cause
of death.
Polynucleotide therapeutics (gene therapy, anti-sense RNA, etc). Gene therapy
with telomerase has already been shown to increase life- and healthspan in mice
and gene therapy with myostatin inhibitor may help to prevent frailty in elderly people.
[83]
Methods of Polynucleotide Delivery [92]
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The SENS Research Foundation is currently researching methods for inserting large piec-
es of DNA in the genome in a site-specic manner, and anti-sense therapeutics against
lipoprotein(a) for the treatment of cardiovascular disease are currently in clinical testing.
Apheresis is a procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a patient, after which a spe-
cic component of the blood is removed, such as a particular type of cell, after which
the blood is reintroduced in the patient.
One particular procedure to this effect is called heterochronic parabiosis: con-
necting the blood supplied of animals of different ages – used in stem cell
and aging research for the last few decades. The evidence that heterochron-
ic parabiosis extends the lifespan of old animals can be interpreted in two ways.
Either the shared blood supply helps to dilute a pro-aging factor in the blood of the
old animal, or it helps to introduce an anti-aging factor into the blood stream pro-
duced by the young animal. If the former turns out to be true then apheresis could
potentially be used to remove the pro-aging factor from the blood of elderly people.
The SENS Research Foundation has already patented an apheresis device to re-
move senescent white blood cells from the circulation (US20120145641 A1).
Probiotics are living microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts,
confer a health benet on the host. As the gut microbiome may play a role in aging and
age-related diseases (such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 2 diabetes)
the use of probiotics may help to promote longevity. However its is likely to remain small.
Bionics is the replacement of diseased or damaged tissues, organs or other body parts
with mechanical or other articial substitutes.
Physical therapy. Anti-aging interventions need not be chemical and biological, but
can also be physical, in particular as relates to various resuscitation technologies, e.g.
hypothermia and suspended animation, oxygenation, electromagnetic stimulation.
Such technologies represent veritable means for life extension, demonstrably saving
people from an almost certain death. But similar principles could also be used for pre-
ventive anti-aging treatments and in less acute cases.
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SENS Research Foundation patented apheresis device
(US20120145641 A1) [85]
The role of probiotics in aging and longevity [90]
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Major Trends in Geroscience
The Convergence of Regenerative Medicine, P3 Medicine and
Geroscience
The widest ceiling over the aspirations of geroscience has always been the inextricabili-
ty of disease from aging and the inextricability of aging from human metabolism, which,
being so complex and integral to our day-to-day functioning, can only be amended
rather than reconstructed.
This limits us because it robs us of the most obvious approach to radical life extension:
radical interference in human metabolism. For just as we might like to be able to alter
a car’s inner workings so that they inict less wear and tear, so too might we like to be
able to somehow rearrange metabolism so that it inicts less wear and tear on body
tissues.
Sadly this is not an option. While subtle interventions in areas such as calorie restriction
mimetics hold some promise to appreciably increase life expectancy, anything amount-
ing to a successful radical intervention in metabolism which radically extends life span
is inconceivable for the foreseeable future for the above reasons.
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A very incomplete overview of human metabolism (Wikimedia Com-
mons)
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The thymus of an old mouse rebuilt by scientists at Edinburgh University
[75]
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Regenerative Medicine, P3 Medicine and Geroscience
This brings us to the alternative approach to vehicle longevity: repair and maintenance.
Which in human terms means the continuous restoration of human tissues, irrespective
of the various processes that age them.
These two approaches differ starkly. The former could be thought of as like meddling
with the inner mechanisms of a clock, cogs and all, in order to slow it down. The latter
could be imagined as forcing back the hands of a clock, setting back the progress, while
inner clockwork, the process, remains unaffected.
In human terms ‘setting back the hands’ means taking knowledge obtained by gerosci-
ence, fashioning it into a damage report and devising a repair strategy. And just as set-
ting back a clock does not require the same extensive knowledge of horology as would
be involved with meddling with the clockwork, nor does the restoration of aging tissue
require an unfeasibly extensive knowledge of geroscience, only enough enumerate of
the manifest differences between old and young tissue.
So could we then aspire to repair these enumerated damages comprehensively enough
and rapidly enough to appreciably postpone disease? In other words might there be
an extent to which we can afford to allow aging to proceed as it normally does while
simultaneously clearing up the damage it leaves behind, kicking the can disease down
the road?
We are in effect describing the application of regenerative medicine to aging. Regen-
erative medicine is an area of biotechnology which aims to restore damaged tissues
and organs. So why not tissues and organs damaged by the miscellaneous ravages of
age?
Prior to the proliferation of regenerative medicine technique in the 1990s, organs and
tissues were restored by one of two methods: either biomimetic implants (articial or-
gans’, ‘prosthetics’) or transplants, biological material donated from another individual.
Regenerative medicine is different from both. Unlike implants, products of regenerative
medicine are organic living tissues, not bionic machines. Regenerative medicine shares this
trait with transplants also. But whereas transplants are made from tissues and organs do-
nated by another individual, regenerative medicine utilises a patient’s own cells and tissues.
There are advantages to the regenerative medicine approach over the transplants
and implants. One is that both transplants and implants require immunosuppressants
to keep the recipient organism from rejecting received organs, whereas regenerative
medicine technologies avoids this need by utilising patient’s’ own stem cells.
But more importantly regenerative medicine technology allows treatment on
a much smaller scale. Whereas implants and transplants can only replace tis-
sues and organs, regenerative medicine can set things right at a cellular level.
A 2013 academic paper in Cell entitled Hallmarks of Aging conclud-
ed that the main pathologies of aging are linked to errors in cell func-
tion, and specically describes regenerative medicine as a solution. [44]
Age, in other words, can be treated quite validly as an assortment of tissue damages
at a cellular level, and regenerative medicine, acting on geroscientic knowledge to
identify the damage, is an indispensable repair toolkit.
Applications of regenerative medicine [43]
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Regenerative Medicine, P3 Medicine and Geroscience
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Regenerative medicine is a relatively new concept. The term was rst coined in 1992 to
describe various treatment at the time that hampered chronic illness and regenerated
failed organs. This marked the beginning of a general period of research into the possi-
bility of inducing at will the natural self-regenerative capabilities in human.
Despite being fairly common among organisms (from the simple hydrae to the complex
vertebrates), natural self-regeneration in human (as well as most mammalian) tissues
is unusual, as most organs and tissues do not possess any restorative capabilities.
There are however, some exceptions. The most notable being the liver.Research into
liver regeneration is still at an early stage but has already revealed that the liver can
completely regenerate from a quarter of its original size, due to the stem capabilities
Prospective interventions to combat aging. [45]
Liver regeneration [46]
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Regenerative Medicine, P3 Medicine and Geroscience
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of hepatocytes, the main cell type in the liver [46], and there is also evidence of other
factors, such as cytokines and exosomes involved in this process [45].
Although regenerative medicine involves a great many methods and procedures, the
most common involve the use of stem cells.
Stems cells are a type of cell that can form other types of cells in our body. They are
categorised according to their their potency, which means their ability to differentiate
into other cell types:
Totipotent stem cells are cells that can differentiate into any cell in the organ-
ism. They are created after a sperm fuses with the egg and are quickly spent. To date
no therapy has been yet been developed which uses totipotent stem cells.
Pluripotent stem cells. They are formed from totipotent stem cells and are
capable of forming into ectoderm, mesoderm, or endoderm..
Multipotent stem cells can form a smaller yet more specialised group of cells,
usually related to the specic organ or system.
Oligopotent stem cells are even less potent than multipotent. They differentiate
into only a small subsection of cells.
Unipotent stem cells can only replicate themselves, however, they are still able
to renew themselves and thus regaining stem properties.
Stem cell differentiation [47]
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There are multiple methods for obtaining stem cells for medical use, each with advan-
tages and disadvantages, both practical and ethical. Stem cells can be obtained as:
Fetal or embryonic stem cells. These are stem cells received from aborted fetuses.
They have high potency but come with practical and ethical concerns. These cells are
directly linked to the increased probability of tumour formation. [51] Moreover there are
fears that widespread use of fetal stem cells would eventually lead to modied fetuses
created solely for the creation of such cells.
Adult stem cells. The most widespread type of stem cell. Generally it is advised to use
autologous adult stem cells, meaning derived from patient’s own tissues such as blood
or bone marrow.Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Although autologous adult
stem cells are safer and more effective than fetal stem cells, they lack potency. Recent
breakthroughs have shown that it is possible to reprogram adult stem cells so that they
become pluripotent. This discovery was so important it earned J. Gurdon and S. Ya-
manaka were awarded a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2012 [49]. Induced
pluripotent stem cells have advantages over both previous types and are the source for
the most disruptive stem cell therapies.
Since the discovery of iPSCs the rate of regenerative medicine research has been
accelerating. It is now possible to use stem cells in the treatment of blood and eye
disorders, with further applications currently being sought. Already research suggests
that stem cell therapies can be implemented to treat cardiovascular disease, vision
impairment, viral infections, such as HIV/AIDS, and neurodegeneration.
Neurodegeneration, the aging-related functional decline of the nervous system, is of
particular importance here.
Possible origins of stem cells[52]
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As the nervous system, and the brain especially, remain one of the most scientically
obscure areas of our anatomy, it is clear that without further advance in neuroscience
itself, the preventive treatment of the neurodegenerative diseases will remain a chal-
lenge for the longevity industry.
Neurodegeneration is not a singular process, but a conuence of processes which lead
to overall cognitive decline, which in turn leads to a number of distinct disorders that
include Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis (ALS), and other miscellaneous cognitive impairments.
These diseases severely reduce life expectancy. For example the estimated lifespan of
an Alzheimer’s patient after diagnosis is usually no more than 9 years. [53]. And for the
majority of these diseases there are no known cures.
Many prospective drugs for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease are being developed
by companies all around the globe, but given the development cycle of therapeutics,
they aren’t likely to hit the market in the nearest future.
The treatments currently on the market are essentially palliative care therapeutics. The
goal of those drugs is to slow down rather than halt the inevitable decline. [54]
The contributing factors to neurodegeneration t into three main categories:
Genetic factors. Individuals who have a family history of neurodegenerative diseases
have much higher risk of having it themselves compared to individuals that lack any
such history (for example, the heritability of Alzheimer’s diseases is 79%). [55]
Epigenetic factors. The involvement of epigenetics would explain the late onset of the
majority of neurodegenerative disease. All three main epigenetic mechanisms (DNA
methylation, histone modication and non-coding RNA (ncRNA)) inuence the diseases. A
number of therapeutics targeting each of these mechanisms is likely to hit the market soon.
Neurodegeneration [52]
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Environmental factors. There is some evidence to suggest that environmental con-
ditions directly affect the probability of neurodegenerative diseases. Research into this
area is very incomplete, but there is at least evidence to suggest that poor environment
can inuence neurodegeneration at least indirectly, as the patterns of the epigenetic
changes are modied by the environmental factors. [56]
The established approach to neurodegenerative diseases has been to seek treatments
disease-by-disease, but this has been a losing battle biogerontological research has
shown multiple neurodegenerative diseases to be clearly rooted in aging.
The remaining way forward for neurodegeneration is, aptly enough, a form of neuro-re-
generation. Namely, the regenerative medical approach applied to this facet of aging.
In February 2017 two landmark research institutions: The SENS Research Foundation
and Buck Institute for Research on Aging launched a joint research program on age-re-
lated neurodegeneration.
OurultimategoalistondtreatmentsforAlzheimersandParkinson’sdisease.Work-
ing with SRF will enable us to look at whether it is possible to use a new method to
reverse and prevent the formation of tau tangles — said the program leader Dr. Julie
K. Andersen, referring to the insoluble twisted bers found inside the aged brain’s cells
Mechanism of neurodegeneration [55]
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-- ‘whichwillhelpusmakesignicantprogressinaddressingthesecomplexdisorders’.
[57]
In light of SRF’s previous work on macular degeneration and atherosclerosis, it is hoped
this collaboration too will bring regenerative medical solutions to neurodegeneration a
step closer to realisation.
The prospect of success in this area in particular makes regenerative medicine a po-
tential pillar of the longevity industry, accelerating progress by an order of magnitude.
But it is fraught with risks, such as the propensity of stem cells to become cancerous.
Indeed regenerative medicine is a toolkit of highly innovative, highly invasive technol-
ogies with clinical trials still a great many years off. Anti-aging gene therapy trials, for
example, are still in their absolute infancy, as are the therapies themselves.
But what if there is a way to sidestep these risks also? What if we could make prospec-
tive interventions safer and less invasive, reducing the remaining degree of risk to be
subject to trial, and thereby accelerating progress?
Enter personalized or precision medicine, already drawing popular, business, and aca-
demic interest. The core concept of personalized medicine can be summarized as follows:
as people vary among themselves in various ways, including genetics and epigenetics,
therapies should be adjusted based on personal characteristics of each individual patient.
Often personalized medicine is used in conjunction with participatory, preventive
and predictive, and hence it has become known as ‘P3 medicine’ approach:
To take personal traits of the patient into the consideration
Prospective brain rejuvenation to combat neurodegeneration [54]
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To involve patients in collaboration in the healthcare process
To prevent diseases when possible, rather than to treat them
To predict diseases before they do any substantial damage
Personalized medicine is heavily tied to the eld of genomics and bioinformatics.
Whereas gene therapy strives to create genome-altering therapeutics for treating ge-
netic ailments, P3 medicine seeks to learn from an individual’s genetics instead of
altering it.
This approach is safer and less invasive. However implementing it in the healthcare
system can be truly a daunting task.
Even though the mass implementation of the P3 medicine was a long expected event,
it took a long time to bring this approach to the healthcare system. But once the Hu-
man Genome project was completed, it became possible to reference human genetic
information for meaningful results.
P3 Medicine [58]
Traditional vs. Personalised Medicine [86]
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The development of P3 medicine was precipitated by three key enablers:
Consumer-driven healthcare in conjunction with social networks has managed
to bring big data to medicine, creating the ability to categorise patients for better
personalized treatment choice.
Systems biology has brought previously unknown bioinformatic capabilities. Now-
adays, it is possible to sequence the entire human genome for only a $1000, while
in 2001 it cost up to the $1T.
The digital revolution itself had to happen in order to bring about modern machine
learning and big data which are essential to P3.
Personalized medicine has already sown the seeds for ve transformations in the
modern healthcare system:
1. Medical data generated from the general human population instead of the limited
clinical trials test groups. It will be like Phase IV clinical but on an unprecedented
scale.
2. A global increase in cost-effectiveness of drug discovery enabled by break-
throughs in molecular and cellular studies.
3. A accelerated pace of innovation boosted by a combination of drug discovery and
therapy innovations.
4. A proactive, rather than reactive, science-based approach to the medicine, and a
patient-assisted self-surveillance of the benets.
5. A rapidly-growing P3 medicine industry that will become bigger than the traditional
healthcare system. [60]
The pace at which these trends will bear fruit is difcult to estimate precisely, but a rapid
Key enablers of the P3 medicine [59]
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growth of personalized medicine in the healthcare system is expected in the next ten
years.
Finally, an important aspect of P3 medicine in the context of the longevi-
ty industry is the diagnostic and prognostic methods. In order to use person-
alised medicine to maximum effect the following would need to be implemented:
Biomarker-based diagnostics for the efcient recognition of the hallmarks of aging
Digital methods of prognostics based on bioinformatics and big data:
Personalized medicine promises to transform the healthcare industry and with it the fu-
ture of human longevity. But it is still contingent on a multitude of enabling technologies
and needs interdisciplinary research to make them work together in order to create a
safer, more effective and more precise healthcare system.
Perspectives on personalized medicine in the next 10 years
P3 diagnostics and prognostics for anti-aging
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AI in Healthcare and Geroscience
“Anysufcientlyadvancedtechnologyisindistinguishablefrommagic”
~ Arthur C. Clarke
Articial intelligence may just amount to this sufciently advanced technology.
In the past ten years, while regenerative medicine was transplanting tracheas, building
blood vessels, building bladders, growing heart valves, creating inner ear cells, and
treating brain injuries, articial intelligence has been driving vehicles, delivering par-
cels, managing households and marketing music.
And it may well prove to be another string to the bow of the longevity industry.
Precision and big data
Thus far we have looked at geroscientic interventions in metabolism, regenerative
medicine workarounds to the limits of geroscience, and the precision approach to both
of these.
But precision in medicine is only made possible by the consolidation and analysis of
vast quantities of medical data.
Consider for example the precision approach to cancer. The approach to cancer as
a single disease is already obsolete. We’re identifying an ever-growing number of
subsets of patient genetic proles correlated with different mutations and variants of
cancer. And drug candidates must be tailored for each subset.
The same goes for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.
This precision approach to disease therefore requires a vast array of data types: com-
plex genome sequences, cell structures, organ structures, patient demographics, pa-
tient medical records, lab test, experimental results, medical imaging data, records of
drug interaction with affected cells and so on.
Or to put it simply, high precision requires big data.
The problem with big data
Data is only useful when it becomes information. That is, when it is properly processed,
parsed, categorised and organised. And more healthcare data is being collected than can
be processed manually. This currently involves error-prone specialists and clinicians sifting
through seemingly endless amounts of data in order to develop the most rational diagno-
ses and treatments for a patient. Specialists and doctors spend far more time on this than
on attending to patients and conducting new research. This increases the delay between
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diagnosis and treatment, and de-prioritises prevention and early detection of disease.
And as medicine becomes more ‘data-driven’, this workload will only increase.
Big medical data is particularly unwieldy in the following respects:
Medical data is not all in one place. Data from healthcare comes from many differ-
ent sources and in various formats - from digital medical records to wearable devices.
Medical data is not integrated between medical facilities and their multiple depart-
ments, which inhibits accessibility to important data that could be used to help diagnose
and treat patients with similar histories and diseases.
Medical data not all digitised. For example there are still old research papers and
textbooks containing the necessary data.
Medical data is inconsistent. It is not yet centralised and the concepts and denitions
used globally throughout the history of medical research are not strictly comparable, so
it is difcult to glean from the sum of it denitions of what should now be considered to
be ‘best practice’.
Medical data is constantly updated. New research is constantly conducted all over
the world which leads to changes in our medical understanding and new information.
Professionals are encouraged to keep abreast of new research but this is difcult for
the above reasons.
The role of big data [91]
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There is also inconsistency in how the data is collected, so that even well structured
data such as patient medical records is compiled in a manner unique to the establish-
ment from which it originates. This adds a further layer of irregularity that makes data
collected from multiple establishments difcult to analyse.
Introducing articial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML)
If the problem is vast quantities of globally scattered, inconsistent and constantly up-
dated medical data of diverse formats and disparate origins, then preparing it for use
will take a miracle. Or ‘a technology indistinguishable from magic’. We are alluding here
not only to articial intelligence (AI), the attempt to automate intelligent behaviour, but
to ‘machine learning’ (ML), the use of AI to glean meaningful information from masses
of raw data.
Machine Learning Overview [93]
Fortunately biotech and AI are no strangers. Various innovators such as Elon Musk
already see A.I. as a cornerstone of the industry. His company BioSpace, who are the
brains behind SpaceX and Tesla, launched the biotech company Neuralink, whose ulti-
mate goal is to link the human brain with a computer. The idea is to implant computers
into a human brain as a way to merge man-made software with the brain in order to
improve memory. Neuralink is currently developing a technology called “neural lace”
that would allow the brain to communicate with a computer without having to physically
interface with it. Following in the same footsteps, MyndYou, a data-driven platform that
provides tools for maintaining cognitive abilities, has created an articial intelligence
diagnostics tool to track the subtle changes in speech patterns of Alzheimer’s patients.
The technology encompasses a unique method for analysing multiple parameters re-
lated to change in cognition that are collected as part of day to day life, which includes
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speech patterns. At present, the program is being tested through a collaboration with
Massachusetts General Hospital. The study will validate MyndYou’s technology for the
remote, automated detection of subtle changes in speech patterns of Alzheimer’s pa-
tients. And in July, the Mayo Clinic together with the Massachusetts-based nference,
who seek to synthesise the world’s biomedical knowlege, launched a startup company
called Qrativ, focused on drug development which, according to Murali Aravamudan,
co-founder and Chief Executive Ofcer of Qrativ and nference, is powered by a core
technology based on a neural network ensemble for identifying nascent drug-disease,
drug-gene and other therapeutically-relevant associations from the vast biomedical lit-
erature”.
So already machine learning is making its inuence gradually felt in biotech. But why
only now? One reason is the sudden availability of data. Historically, even well into the
information age, it has been difcult to access large quantities of biomedically relevant
data, but now we see the sudden emergence of databases in the public domain. This
was precipitated not only by recent advances in computing power and AI algorithms,
but also a mandate from the USA’s National Institute of Health (NIH) that any re-
search body receiving Federal funding must place such data in the public domain.
Machine learning and big data
AI alleviates the burden of big data by intelligently consolidating vast quantities of irreg-
ular medical data into a single central database. This then becomes information that
can be sorted through instantly so that relevant articles can be prioritised for different
clinicians and specialists on a case by case basis.
It allows collaboration across a complex ecosystem of entities spread across the
globe: universities carrying out primary research data, biobanks holding biomedical
sample and sample data, pharmaceutical companies holding drug data and biotech
companies holding patient data among many other things.
Collaboration among these entities, including innovative partnership models, custom-
er engagement and trust in data is of paramount importance as it creates a platform
for facilitating data processing and data access to all stakeholders.
Data thus consolidated also has the advantage of unmasking regular errors made by
doctors or hospitals so that they could be held accountable and given the chance to
improve.
How AI & ML are transforming drug discovery
Drug discovery comes at a very high cost, but success brings signicant benets to
mankind. A breakthrough drug can cure a critical disease for hundreds of thousands of
patients across the globe and can earn the company making the drug billions of dollars
in revenue. That is why, just to bring one of the breakthrough drug to market, compa-
nies spend hundreds of millions of dollars on decades on a single avenue of research,
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not knowing where the research will bear fruit.
This deep exploration of potential false avenues brings with it the potential for a tremen-
dous amount of wasted time, money and effort.
But this research landscape is changing. Machine learning, unencumbered by human
intuition and armed with vast quantities of data, can cut down on waste by prioritising
research.
Deep Learning for Drug Discovery [93]
The reliability of of AI-driven drug trials lies in the fact that hypotheses are generated
not from occasional human epiphanies but from masses of cold hard data, yielding less
wasteful hypotheses. Drug companies have already been using articial intelligence to
decide in advance whether, for example, it is worth investigating whether a particular
drug might bind to a particular protein. But there is trend toward ever more advanced
estimates, such as how the same drug might subsequently affect a patient’s cells or
tissues.
Machine learning also has implications for patient safety and regulatory hurdles. The
use of patient-derived data could help pharmaceutical companies better identify and
recruit patients for clinical trials for the therapies most likely to work for them, boosting
the chances of approval by regulatory agencies such as the [US’s] Food and Drug Ad-
ministration (FDA).
Project Survival, for example, is a $17 million seven-year study bankrolled by Berg, a
Massachusetts biotech rm, one of several companies in the US and Europe currently
using AI to make drug research and development less expensive and more efcient.
Intelligent machines scour patient’s genes for molecular ngerprints or biomarkers that
can later be used to help measure a specic drug’s impact and identify the patients in
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which such a drug is likely to be most useful.
Some companies such as Insilico Medicine Inc. in Baltimore, are forming research
partnerships with universities and nonprots or setting up AI services aimed at drug
companies.
Based at Johns Hopkins University’s Emerging Technology Centers, Insilico uses ge-
nomics, big data analysis and deep learning for in silico drug discovery. The company
has drug discovery programs in cancer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and diabetes, as
well as in age-related diseases such as sarcopenia, Parkinson’s disease and Alzhei-
mer’s disease.
In January, GlaxoSmithKline PLC (GSK) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
in California announced a partnership to use AI for pharmaceutical R&D. The consor-
tium is establishing itself in San Francisco and signing on further collaborators with the
stated aim of using AI to slash development time from ten years down to one.
Now GSK is now partnering with Insilico Medicine to explore howInsilico’s AI technol-
ogy could aid the drug discovery process by identifying novel biological targets and
pathways of interest.
“In our opinion, GSK is one of the most innovative science-led healthcare companies,
whichrealizedthepotentialofarticialintelligenceearlyandhasdemonstrateditsabil-
itytopartnerwithinnovativestartupsintheeld.Wearedelightedtocollaboratewith
arguably,someoftheworld’sbestscientistsonchronicdiseaseswithunmetneed.”
Alex Zhavoronkov, Ph.D., founder and CEO of Insilico Medicine.
The Insilico collaboration is GSK’s second drug discovery deal of the summer based
around AI. Earlier in July of this year they secured a deal with Exscientia, which auto-
mates drug discovery with its AI-enabled platform that could see the Scotland-based
company rake in up to £33 million in research payments.
In Europe, scientists are getting ready to launch a similar initiative, which will include
Johnson & Johnson ’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals division, plus several other drug com-
panies and academic researchers.
AI’s broader role in biotech
But we have yet to pull out all the stops. Progress is retarded by a catch 22 : Financers
of science don’t like taking scientic risks, and scientists don’t like taking nancial risks.
And like the space industry, the longevity industry is comprised of many converging
technologies and the road ahead has many false avenues and therefore a presents a
landscape of clear and present risk in the eyes of investors.
But moves are already underway to addressing both sides of the catch 22: removing
nancial risk by using AI to orchestrate global investment, and removing scientic risk
by offering tools for machine learning, deep learning, and articial intelligence to the
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companies that receive it.[65]
This would also have implications for the geographical distribution of funding. Profes-
sional investors in biotech have traditionally tended to stick to familiar comfort zones
such the San Francisco Bay Area and Boston, MA. While European life science re-
mains mired in a culture of risk aversion and Britain is strewn from north to south with
cash-starved regenerative medical centres and expertise. But because machines have
no comfort zones, we should not be surprised
if articially intelligent investment results in a totally new and counterintuitive global
distribution of funding for this industry. AI would not hesitate to exploit the talent and
manpower of neglected regions, busting wide open the monopoly of traditional biotech
hot spots, increasing the range and relevance of research, laying the groundwork nec-
essary to raise regenerative medicine to the next levels.
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An Undeclared War: Roadblocks in Geroscience and the Road For-
ward
In 2018, ‘aging’ remains an unnamed adversary in an undeclared war. For all intents
and purposes it is mere abstraction in the eyes of regulatory authorities worldwide.
The World Health Organization (WHO), which sets the standards by which medical
conditions are classied as specic diseases, subject to regulatory approval from spe-
cic nations, has never declared aging itself either a disease or any kind of target for
biomedical intervention [61].
Any prospective therapy must aim to gain approval as a treatment for a particular rec-
ognised age-related disease or condition and this therefore leaves us with a difculty. It
is hard to argue to regulatory authorities that any age-related disease or inrmity already
recognised is likely to be prevented by a given proposed therapeutic intervention in ag-
ing, even if aging were ostensibly retarded or reversed as a consequence. So much of
the argument depends on incomplete knowledge of the links between aging and disease.
Unless an argument can be made based on shorter ramications, geroscientic thera-
pies cannot gain approval.
The result has been a series of proxy wars on this or that disease, while the empire of
aging remains unmolested.
However there is emerging consensus in the geroscience community that aging
can and should be classied as a distinct disease via the WHO’s International Dis-
ease Classication (ICD) system. In a November 2015 a paper publish in Frontiers
in Genetics made a carefully layered recommendation for the classication of aging
as a disease in the 11th World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Statistical
Classication of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-11) in 2018. [62] [63].
«Aging is a complex multifactorial process leading to loss of function and a very broad
spectrum of diseases. While the notion of whether aging itself is a disease is usually
disputed, classifying it as such
will help shift the focus of biomedicine from treatment
to prevention. Classifying aging as a disease with multiple ‘non-garbage’ ICD codes
may help create business cases for large pharmaceutical companies to focus more
R&Dresourcesonthisimportanteld.Consideringtheunprecedentedincreasesinlife
expectancy and the heavy burden of medical costs in the developed countries, main-
taining the human body in the disease-free youthful state for as long as possible is not
just an altruistic cause, but a pressing economic necessity», said Alex Zhavoronkov,
PhD, CEO of Insilico Medicine, Inc.
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But the expression of such logic is highly innovative and starkly at odds with existing
popular and professional ethics.
It comes just four years after Colin Blakemore, formerly the Chief Executive of the
British Medical Research Council (MRC), in the UK, appeared in Oxford’s Sheldonian
Theatre in a 2011 public ethical debate against Aubrey de Grey to defend the presence
of aging in the human body. Although the event got some mainstream media converge,
the sight of a former UK health chief defending medicine’s eternal nemesis went entire-
ly unremarked upon.
‘The Debate of Ages’, Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford. [88]
This lack of practical and ethical resolve among public and professionals is linked to the
non-conceptual way in which aging is regarded by public and professionals. Years of
silence from scientic authorities on the tractable nature of aging have allowed a near
total absence of any popular conception of aging as something ultimately amenable to
physical intervention.
Democratic demand for a war on cancer continues decades after its declaration be-
cause, despite it remaining unwon, a cure is still popularly conceived of as the removal
or prevention of a tumour, and that very notion of the concrete and attainable objective
continues to galvanise public demand for further research.
Whereas aging, despite being equally physical in nature to cancer, is still thought of
as something mystically outside the realm of amenability, a habit of mind which makes
itself immediately apparent in popular turns of phrase.
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For example, a cancer patient may complain that his cancer is ‘eating him alive’, but a
person left inrm by aging merely laments that ‘time has taken its toll’ on him. He does
not complain that his cells are lled with junk or strewn with collagen crosslinks, which
would be the equivalent verbal portrait of advanced biological age.
We have neither a declaration of war from the authorities nor an ability to conceive of
the enemy among the public. The result has been inertia.
This inertia is further compounded by the fact that constituent technologies of the lon-
gevity industry, even those not known primarily for their anti-aging signicance, are
mired in regulation. Human gene therapy trials for example were been regulated down
to a near-halt since since human trials produced their rst death in 1999 in Arizona and
another two in 2003 in France [64].
But the safety of the technology has improved dramatically in the past decade.
And in 2018, we are due see the rst human clinical trials for heart failure treatment in
several years [66].
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Conclusion
“If I have seen further than others it is by standing on the shoulders of
giants”
~Isaac Newton
The rate of progress
Longevity is a simple metric, the simplest there is, being a single variable. But what is
now its main inhibitor, aging, has a myriad of forms and causes, and a myriad of poten-
tial redresses, of which a balanced let alone detailed summary would be infeasible. As
such this has necessarily been a rough sketch of uncharted waters.
But we are nally beginning to see an industry emerge from mankind’s attempts to
make sense of the biological chaos. This industry has the form of two parallel technol-
ogies: biomedical gerontology and rejuvenation biotechnology, built upon a foundation
of knowledge mined by geroscience over decades. The progress of both has drawn the
attention of the mainstream media, as well as entrepreneurs and policymakers seeking
to bring anti-aging therapies closer to realisation.
But no progress, no matter how disruptive, is made in an instant. Research creeps
forward without fanfare, building on previous discoveries and forming trends. Even the
CRISPR/Cas system, the plainest recent example of an unforeseen biotech break-
through, was built atop years of endonuclease research.
Gartner Technology Hype Cycle [67]
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Nonetheless a close look at the industry reveals which technological threads are ad-
vancing quickest:
One is articial intelligence. According to the US research and advisory rm Gartner,
machine learning has reached the peak of the ‘hype cycle’ (which indicates when a
technology is close to mainstream adoption) and will be fully embraced by the main-
stream by 2020 [67]. There are clear indications of increased interest in machine
learning technologies in longevity research, with many analytical agencies expecting
AI technologies to enhance the precision of drug discovery and assemble fully person-
al therapies for patients based on their records. [68] [69]
Also of interest is senolytics, the prospective class of pharmaceuticals that can re-
move senescent cells. Senolytic drug discovery has received a signicant boost in
terms of speed and public interest in recent years. Over 10 prospective senolytic drug
candidates are being developed, and senolytics are expected to enter the market in
less than a decade, and some, for example Dasatinib, a known anti-cancer medica-
tion, are already being used in healthcare.
The eld of regenerative medicine has made a signicant progress in the last de-
cade, after a number of key enablers such as from iPSC technology and 3D printing
of organic structures [70] It is the focus of several major longevity institutions. The
Methuselah Foundation is particularly interested right now, and is establishing two
major tissue engineering competitions under the New Organ campaign [71]. Such
investments, combined with the technological advancements, ensure that progress in
the application of regenerative medicine to aging remains a trend.
57
Conclusion
Progress in tissue engineering
58
Conclusion
Personalized medicine serves as an accelerating factor to all three, having been precip-
itated by a number of prerequisites: system biology, articial intelligence technologies,
and Big Data. The technology has the potential to transform the healthcare industry but
in order to make its mark it would need to incorporate biomarker-based diagnostics for
the efcient recognition of the hallmarks of aging and digital methods of prognostics
based on bioinformatics and Big Data.
Last but not least we should keep an eye on gene therapy. Gene therapy is the most
preventative of any technology discussed here as it goes to the root of pathology by
striving to prevent harmful gene expression. Being the most effective way to treat ge-
netic disorders, it has a wide range of possible applications in the healthcare system.
And with the advent of the CRISPR/Cas systems, the accuracy and safety of gene
interventions were raised to a new level. Gene therapies also have multiple uses in the
longevity industry, from expressing telomerase in somatic adult somatic tissues [73] to
emulating effects of mTOR inhibitors [74] in animal models. Although it is the prospect
farthest from widespread implementation, it may ultimately prove the most inuential,
and there are already successful cases.
None of these technologies will reach fruition in time to avert the immediate crisis. Ja-
pan is already in the shadow of silver tsunami, and the rest of are sure to get wet. The
danger is real, and technological threads outlined here -- both the short-term and the
more speculative -- are the only ood defenses yet conceived of. And their implemen-
tation is a matter of political, nancial and scientic will.
In Part 2 we look at the people and institutions involved in making it happen.
The difference between conventional and gene therapy [72]
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Longevity Research Landscape Overview 2017
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Infographic Summary
Part III
LONGEVITY.INTERNATIONAL
GLOBAL
LONGEVITY
SCIENCE
LANDSCAPE 2017
LONGEVITY.INTERNATIONAL
USA
United Kingdom
Other
EU
Top 10 Geroscience Journals
Top 10 Geroscience Books
Top 10 Online Resources
Top 10 Geroscience Conferences
SCIENCE LABS
NON-PROFIT
GEROSCIENCE HUBS
Top Longevity Research Labs
Top Longevity Non-Prots
Other
Europe
USA
Basic research and direct application
thereof
Disruptive engineering solutions
Supportive, palliative, geriatric,
policy
Basic research and direct
application thereof
Disruptive engineering solutions
O
ther
Europe
USA
Supportive,palliative,
geriatric, policy
Top Longevity Journals
Top Longevity Books
Other Europe
USA
Supportive, palliative, geriatric,
policy
Basic research and direct
application thereof
Disruptive engineering solutions
Other Europe
USA
Supportive, palliative,
geriatric, policy
Basic research and direct
application thereof
Disruptive engineering
solutions
Top Longevity Databases
Top Longevity Conferences
Other
Europe
USA
Supportive,palliative,
geriatric, political
Basic research and direct
application thereof
Disruptive engineering
solutions
Biological Data
Me tadata
Dise asesDemographic Data
Top 100 Longevity
Research Labs
Analytical Report 2017
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Invest f or li fe
Part IV
Other
Europe
USA
Basic research and direct application
thereof
Disruptive engineering solutions
Supportive, palliative, geriatric,
policy
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
76
1. Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services and the University of
Pittsburgh
2. Ageing Research Centre, New South Wales Health Department
3. Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm
University
4. Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC)
5. Alzheimer‘s Disease Research Center (ADRC), University of
Pittsburgh
6. Alzheimer‘s Disease Research Center (ADRC), School of Medi-
cine, Emory University
7. Arizona Center of Aging (ACOA), University of Arizona
8. Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA), Aston
University
9. Australian Institute for Population Ageing Research
10. Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, Health Sci-
ence Center, University of Texas
11. Brunel Institute for Ageing Studies (BIAS), Brunel
12. Caesar Center of Advanced European Studies and Research
13. Center for Aging Research, The Dartmouth Institute for Health
Policy & Clinical Practice
14. Center for Aging Research (IU-CAR), Indiana University
15. Center for Healthy Aging Research, College of Public Health &
Human Sciences, Oregon State University
16. Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of Roch-
ester Medical Center
17. Center for Population Health and Aging (CPHA), Duke University
18. Center for Research and Education in Aging (CREA), University
of California
19. Center for Research on Aging, School of Medicine, University of
Maryland
20. Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity, Col-
lege of Education & Human Development, Texas A&M University
21. Center for Vital Longevity, University of Texas
22. Center on Aging (COA), University of Iowa
23. Center on Aging, University of Utan
24. Center on Demography and Economics of Aging (CoA)
25. Centre for Ageing and Mental Health (CAMH)
26. Centre for Ageing Research (C4AR), Faculty of Health & Medi-
cine, Lancaster University
27. Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Univer-
sity of Edinburgh
28. Centre for Education and Research on Ageing (CERA), Concord
Repatriation General Hospital, University of Sydney
29. Centre for Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology (ZGGF), Medical
School, University of Freiburg
30. Centre for Innovative Ageing (CIA), Swansea University
31. Centre for Integrated Research into Musculoskeletal Ageing
(CIMA), University of Liverpool
32. Centre for Integrated Systems Biology of Ageing and Nutrition
(CISBAN), Newcastle University
33. Centre for Research on Ageing (CRA)
34. Centre for Research on Ageing (CRA), Curtin University of
Technology
35. Centre for Research on Ageing and Gender (CRAG), University
Surrey
36. Centre for Research on Personhood in Dementia (CRPD),
University of British Columbia
37. Centre Hospitalier Aflié Universitaire de Québec (CHA)
38. Centre on Aging, University of Manitoba
39. Centre on Aging, University of Victoria
40. Clinical Ageing Research Unit (CARU)
41. Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer‘s Disease Center (CNADC)
42. European Research Institute for the Biology of Ageing (ERIBA)
43. Geriatrics Center & Institute of Gerontology
44. Gerontology Research Institute at the University of Massachu-
setts Boston
45. Institut für Gerontologische Forschung IGFe.v.
46. Institute for Aging Research (IFAR)
47. Institute for Biomedical Aging Research (IBA)
48. Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine and Ageing
Research (IBIMA)
49. Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders
(UCI MIND)
50. Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease Research
51. Institute of Ageing Research
52. Institute of Aging (IA)
53. Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer (IDAC)
54. Institute of Gerontology
55. Institute of Gerontology (IOG)
56. Institute of Healthy Ageing (IHA)
57. Institute of Psychogerontology (IPG)
58. Institute on Aging, UC San Diego
59. Institute on Aging, University of Florida
60. Institute on Aging (IOA)
61. Institute on Aging, University of Pennsylvania
62. Institute on Aging, University of Virginia
63. Institute on Aging, University of Wisconsin - Madison
64. Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
(HNRCA)
65. Jena Centre for Systems Biology of Ageing (JenAge)
66. Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health
67. KEEPS - The KRONOS Early Estrogen Prevention Study at
KRONOS Longevity Research Institute (KLRI)
68. Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI)
69. Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine (IUF)
70. Lifespan Health Research Center (LHRC)
71. Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing
(MICRA)
72. Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing
73. Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
74. McGill Centre for Studies in Aging (MCSA)
75. Medawar Centre for Healthy Ageing Research
76. Michigan Alzheimer‘s Disease Center (MADC)
77. Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging (MiCDA)
78. National Ageing Research Institute (NARI)
79. National Institute for Mental Health Research
80. National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life (NISAL)
81. National Institute on Aging (NIA)
82. New Zealand Institute for Research on Ageing (NZiRA)
83. Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
84. Perceptual & Cognitive Aging Lab
85. Research Centre on Aging
86. Salford Institute for Dementia
87. Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA)
88. Sau Po Centre on Ageing
89. School of Aging Studies
90. Smart Ageing International Research Center (SAIRC)
91. Stanford / VA Alzheimer‘s Research Center
92. Stanford Center on Longevity (SCL)
93. The Center for Healthy Ageing
94. The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer‘s Disease Re-
search Center (Knight ADRC)
95. Tulane Center for Aging
96. UAB Center for Aging
97. UCLA Longevity Center
98. UCSF Memory and Aging Center
99. USC Davis School of Gerontology & Ethel Percy Andrus Geron-
tology Center
100. USC/UCLA Center of Biodemography & Population Health
(CBPH)
Top 100 Longevity Rerearch Labs
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
77
Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services and the
University of Pittsburgh
About:
Record numbers of older adults today are living well into their 80s, 90s and beyond. But as we age, we
face increasingly complex challenges that affect how we feel, how we live our daily lives, and how we
interact with the world around us. Helping older adults achieve longer, healthier, and more rewarding
lives is the focus of the Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services and the University of Pittsburgh.
As a world-class academic research center and top-ranked global health care system, the University
of Pittsburgh and UPMC have pioneered advancements in aging and geriatric care for more than
three decades. The Aging Institute brings together the expertise of these renowned researchers,
scholars, and clinicians — along with leading local and national partners — to create and provide
better care, better systems, and better resources for older adults and their caregivers.
The Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services and the University of Pittsburgh will create productive
and innovative programs for older adults by partnering a world-class integrated health care delivery
and nancing system with a leading center for academic scholarship.
Website: http://www.upmc.com/services/aginginstitute/pages/default.aspx
City: Pittsburgh / PA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
The Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services and the University of Pittsburgh will provide integrated,
comprehensive, and timely access to a full range of services for aged persons and the public. It offers
state-of-the-art educational programs for the public and health care professionals, and promotes
innovative research on aging to understand its causes and concomitants, both social and biological,
as well as how best to intervene in illnesses associated with the aging process.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
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Ageing Research Centre, New South Wales Health
Department
About:
The purpose of the centre is to research, develop and promote clinical and community understanding
of the neurodegenerative diseases associated with population ageing, and their impact on the delivery
of health care, community services and residential care.
With its ageing population, Australia will see rapidly rising numbers of older people who have disorders
of cognition, movement, balance, planning capacity and behaviour, including Alzheimer’s Disease,
Parkinson’s Disease and many less common but important neurodegenerative disorders. How they
respond to this phenomenon is of great importance to the health of the population and the design and
delivery of health and aged care services, now and into the future.
Currently, the centre conducts research of a clinical nature and we are working to translate these
ndings to applied population health. This means measuring, projecting and mapping the likely
impacts of brain ageing at a community level.
They also participate in community events and present at national and international conferences to
promote our ndings and their importance in the understanding of brain ageing and its impact on
the health and quality of life of older people themselves, their family carers and the wider Australian
population.
Website: http://www.seslhd.health.nsw.gov.au/POWH/arc/default.asp
City: Randwick / NSW
Country: Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
Aboriginal health, ageing, dementia
Epidemiology
Community health
Health services
Disability
Carer support
Social, environmental, and biological factors responsible for systemic ageing and brain ageing
Neurodegenerative disorders - dementia, movement disorders, multifactorial syndromes of
ageing
Population ageing - geographic information systems analysis
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
79
Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet,
Stockholm University
About:
ARC was established in 2000 by Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University. We are a Forte
Center—one of several research environments across Sweden funded by the Swedish Research
Council for Working Life, Health and Welfare (Forte) as long-term, strategic investments capable of
stimulating scientic innovations.
Together with the Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, the Swedish Dementia Center, and the
magazine Older People in Focus (Äldre i Centrum), they are located in the House of Aging Research
in Stockholm. they conduct research, educate the next generation of aging researchers, and spread
information about our results within and outside the scientic world.
Website: https://ki-su-arc.se/
City: Stockholm
Country: Sweden
Mission/Research Topics:
Risk factors of Alzheimer‘s disease and dementia
Multimorbidity and physical functioning
Cognitive functioning
Brain imaging
Gender differences in brain and cognition
Pharmacoepidemiology
Socio-economic differences in health and ageing
Health economy
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
80
Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC)
About:
The Alzheimer Disease Research Center at USC is supported by the National Institutes of Health to
conduct research on memory problems and aging. Their studies include observational studies that
follow participants over time while examining changes that may occur with age, and therapy studies
such as exercise training, medications and vaccines. Their goals are to understand the biological
changes that may precede worsening memory and to assess whether new treatments including drugs
may be helpful in preventing memory or improving memory loss.
Funded by the NIH, the USC ADRC focuses on mild cognitive changes related to aging, Alzheimer’s
disease and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in multi-ethnic communities. The USC ADRC has three
overarching goals:
To elucidate vascular contributions to Alzheimer’s disease;
To catalyze local research in Alzheimer’s disease at USC (especially Phase I/Phase II clinical
trials); and
To contribute expertise in vascular disease and imaging to national collaborative initiatives.
ADRC has a wide variety of opportunities for volunteers to participate in research studies. Their studies
are aimed at discovering ways to understand, prevent, and treat Alzheimer disease, related conditions
such as vascular brain injury, and other memory problems. They seek diverse volunteers who may or
may not have memory problems on an ongoing basis to help them as research participants.
Website: http://adrc.usc.edu/
City: Los Angeles
Country: USA / CA
Mission/Research Topics:
Conduct research on memory problems and aging.
Observational studies that follow participants over time while examining changes that may occur
with age,
Therapy studies such as exercise training, medications and vaccines.
Understand the biological changes that may precede worsening memory
Assess whether new treatments including drugs may be helpful in preventing memory or improving
memory loss.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
81
Alzheimer‘s Disease Research Center (ADRC), University
of Pittsburgh
About:
The Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at the University of Pittsburgh was established in
1985 by a grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), as a mechanism for integrating, coordinating
and supporting research in Alzheimer’s disease and aging. The ADRC performs and coordinates AD-
related clinical and research activities and is a core source of support (e.g., resources, patients, tissue,
expert consultation for research, clinical and training activities) regionally and nationally. Current
research foci emphasize neuropsychiatry and neuropsychology, molecular genetics and epidemiology,
basic neuroscience, and structural and functional imaging that aid in the diagnosis and treatment of
Alzheimer’s disease. The ADRC is one of the nation’s leading research centers specializing in the
diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. Through outpatient evaluations, participants
and their families receive state-of-the-art diagnostic assessments and contribute to the scientic study
of Alzheimer’s disease.
Specic services at the ADRC include:
Comprehensive diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected Alzheimer’s disease and other
forms of dementia.
Evaluation of memory, language, judgment, and other cognitive abilities
Re-evaluation on an annual basis, or as needed, referrals to physicians, community social service
agencies, transportation services, adult day care, support groups, long-term care, and other
appropriate programs.
Education and counseling for patients and families.
Participation in state-of-the-art research studies.
Website: http://www.adrc.pitt.edu/
City: Pittsburgh / PA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Integrate, coordinate and support research in Alzheimer’s disease and aging.
Perform and coordinate AD-related clinical and research activities
Provide support (e.g., resources, patients, tissue, expert consultation for research, clinical and
training activities) regionally and nationally.
Research neuropsychiatry and neuropsychology, molecular genetics and epidemiology, basic
neuroscience, and structural and functional imaging that aid in the diagnosis and treatment of
Alzheimer’s disease.
Diagnose patients with suspected Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.
Evaluate memory, language, judgment, and other cognitive abilities
Educate and counsel patients and families.
Participation in state-of-the-art research studies.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
82
Alzheimer‘s Disease Research Center (ADRC), School of
Medicine, Emory University
About:
The Emory Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is one of 27 active centers in the nation
supported by the National Institutes of Health. (For a complete list of all active Alzheimer’s Disease
Centers, visit this site). The goal of these centers is to bring scientists together to facilitate their
research and help learn more about Alzheimer’s and related diseases. They are also committed to
the education of health care professionals, persons with Alzheimer’s disease, their families, and their
community to aid in understanding, diagnosis and treatment of these illnesses.
Research is crucial to gain more information about disease, provide better care, and ultimately,
prevent the burden of neurological diseases for future generations. One particular area of interest
of the Emory ADRC is a better understanding of mild cognitive impairment and early diagnosis and
treatment of memory disorders.
Website: http://alzheimers.emory.edu/
City: Atlanta / GA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Bring scientists together to facilitate their research and help learn more about Alzheimer’s and
related diseases.
The education of health care professionals, persons with Alzheimer’s disease, their families, and
our community to aid in understanding, diagnosis and treatment of these illnesses.
Research a better understanding of mild cognitive impairment and early diagnosis and treatment
of memory disorders.
Study of groups underrepresented in research, such as African Americans who are more
affected by Alzheimer’s disease.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
83
Arizona Center of Aging (ACOA), University of Arizona
About:
Aging is the quintessential interdisciplinary issue, cutting across basic sciences, clinical/translational
and health services research – invigorating and bridging research across the campus, across colleges,
across the state. Remarkably, the aging process itself – what actually happens on the biochemical,
genetic, cellular, and physiologic levels remains largely unknown. Differentiating “normal” aging
changes in these processes from signs of potential disease are fundamental to our understanding of
healthy aging and resilience. The center is uniquely positioned and has actively initiated programs to
address these critical issues.
ACOA exists in order to improve quality of living and extend the lifespan of older adults. They want to
eradicate the diseases and conditions that occur in advanced age, and to unleash the unparalleled
wisdom, energy and experience of older adults for the benet of all the world.
They believe that they can best meet this challenge through the true partnership of scientists, health
care providers, educators and community workers. they strive to move fantastic discoveries from the
lab to the community, and to bring questions and observations from real people into the lab where
they can be solved. they are working to develop new ways of delivering healthcare that promote
independence and healthy aging. Finally, they are committed to share these essential discoveries with
communities in Tucson, Arizona, the US and the world through both education and outreach.
Website: http://www.adrc.pitt.edu/
City: Tucson / AZ
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Develop and sustain competency-based interprofessional (IP) geriatric education for health care
learners across the continuum of care.
Providing older adults with evidence-based high-quality, safe, and culturally competent care
towards optimal health outcomes and well-being.
Improving the quality of life for America’s elderly by preparing physicians to provide better care
for frail older people.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
84
Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA),
Aston University
About:
They take a multidisciplinary approach to successful ageing by asking how technological, therapeutic
and psychosocial strategies can be employed to understand and arrest age-related decline.
Their mission is to facilitate research that helps understand, predict and prevent age-related
degeneration. they have a specic focus on the eye, the mind, the metabolism and medicines and
devices in the context of the psychological, social and policy factors affecting ageing lives.
Website: http://www.aston.ac.uk/lhs/research/centres-facilities/archa/
City: Birmingham
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Ageing eye. Researchers work within an integrated investigative framework to advance signicantly
our understanding of the use, preservation and restoration of ocular function in the ageing eye.
Ageing mind. The aim of this cluster is to understand changes in cognitive function as we age
and to use this information to design appropriate interventions that facilitate the maintenance
of independent and active engagement. Understanding neural health and cognitive functioning
facilitates the development of biological, technological or psychological tools to maintain cognitive
performance in older people.
Ageing metabolism. Using tools from bioscience, psychology, sociology and engineering they
seek a better understanding of how changes in metabolism are associated with the ageing
process and how we can intervene to promote a healthy later life.
Medicine and devices in Ageing. This cluster aims to focus on the use of medicines and devices
in older people. Medicines and devices have considerable potential to signicantly improve
outcomes and quality of life in older people. However, conversely, older people are particularly
susceptible to the adverse effects of medicine and devices.
Ageing lives. The ageing process impacts our everyday lives in diverse ways. In this cluster, they
examine how different individuals and communities are enabled or deterred from healthy ageing.
They consider the delivery and impact of health and care policies, as well as attitudes and beliefs
towards issues such as medicines management and keeping active.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
85
Australian Institute for Population Ageing Research
(AIPAR)
About:
The Australian Institute for Population Ageing Research (AIPAR) has been developed within UNSW
as an umbrella for research initiatives focused on demographic transition. Directed by Professor John
Piggott, it aims to be world class in its programs.
It is uniquely global in incorporating research teams covering health, labour, economic, nancial
and technology related issues by harnessing expertise from the elds of business, social sciences,
engineering, medicine and the built environment - the institute is globally unique.
With more than a quarter of Australians estimated to reach over 65 years of age by 2050, the need
to manage and resource an ageing population is of national signicance. The Australian Institute for
Population Ageing Research (AIPAR) recognises that business, government and the not-for-prot
sector are key stakeholders in the success of the Institute. AIPAR works closely with industry leaders,
including corporate and government partners.
In conjunction with these partners, AIPAR undertakes research and stimulates debate about the
challenges raised by global population ageing, develops ideas for new products, formulates policy
proposals and encourages partnerships with other research institutions in Australia and overseas.
Established in 2007, the Institute was ofcially launched in 2009 by the Federal Treasurer, Wayne
Swan who said that, along with climate change, population ageing is the most signicant social
challenge of the 21st century.
City: Sydney
Country: Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
Study demographic transition.
Incorporate research teams globally, covering health, labour, economic, nancial and technology
related issues.
Harness expertise from the elds of business, social sciences, engineering, medicine and the
built environment.
AIPAR’s mission is to bring together researchers and research centres from across UNSW focused on
the issue of population ageing. It will deliver a highly innovative and creative multidisciplinary research
program, mentor a new generation of early career researchers, and deliver broad-based and robust
outcomes for the end-user.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
86
Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, Health
Science Center, University of Texas
About:
Their mission is four-fold: To understand the basic biology of aging; to discover the therapies that will
treat and cure the diseases of aging by fostering dynamic, collaborative research; to educate and train
their future scientists and clinicians; to promote public awareness of age-related issues.
Researchers at the Barshop Institute sustain their scientic endeavors by successfully competing
for funding at the national level. The Barshop Institute supports their research through a wide range
of core services and clinical facilities by sponsoring cutting-edge programs that employ advanced
technologies such as genomics and proteomics, transgenic animal models, and pathological
assessments.
Faculty members of the Barshop Institute are dedicated to the training and mentoring of promising new
physician-scientists and basic researchers in aging through a wide-range of educational opportunities.
Faculty and staff members involved in community outreach programs educate health professionals
and the public on timely issues regarding healthy aging.
This vision of a world-class center for aging research rst came into focus in 1991, when Dr. Edward
J. Masoro founded the UT Health Science Center’s Aging Research and Education Center through a
leadership award granted to him by the National Institutes of Health.
In 2001, the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies was born thanks to a generous donation
from Mr. and Mrs. Sam Barshop, prominent San Antonio philanthropists. Dr. Musi and the faculty
members at the Barshop Institute are extremely grateful to Mr. and Mrs. Barshop for their vision and
steadfast support in helping to develop the Barshop Institute into an unparalleled center for studies of
aging and age-related diseases.
Website: http://www.barshop.uthscsa.edu/
City: San Antonio / TX
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Regenerative medicine and stem cells
Comparative biology of ageing
Ageing and cancer
Ageing-related neurodegeneration
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
87
Brunel Institute for Ageing Studies (BIAS), Brunel
University London
About:
BIAS was developed as a Collaborative Research Network (CRN) in 2007 as part of a university
initiative to encourage cross-disciplinary research activity. BIAS is one of four University CRNs which
seek to address a great number of complex challenges of the future.
The networks bring together teams of experts from across the university in order to:
Foster interdisciplinary research of the highest quality
Spearhead new responses to major research questions
Increase the social, cultural and economic impact of research
Actively pursue partnerships and collaborations with universities, businesses and public sector
organisations who share their goals.
The Collaborative Research Network in Ageing was formed in response to challenges raised by
a growing population, including concern for how current health and social systems will cope with
an increase in the number of people over the age of 60. BIAS aims to lead in the development
and denition of strategic directions for research in the eld of gerontology. It seeks to address
the information needs of policy makers and the private sector, and to facilitate the transfer of new
knowledge for the benet of the whole population.
Website: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/research/centres/bias
City: London
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
88
Caesar C
enter of Advanced European Studies and Research
About:
Caesar is a neuroscience research institute associated with the Max Planck Society. More on the
research program can be found here.
As of 2016, caesar hosts two research departments and many research groups. Like all Max Planck
Institutes, the directors of caesar are scientic members of the Max Planck Society.
Caesar is part of a cluster for neurosciences in the Bonn-Cologne region and has multiple ties
with the University of Bonn and University of Cologne. In collaboration with the Max Planck Florida
Institute for Neuroscience, the University of Bonn and Florida Atlantic University, caesar runs the
International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Brain and Behavior. This rst transatlantic
IMPRS graduate program aims to train students in a large range of cutting-edge techniques which are
currently instrumental in the quest for understanding brain circuit function in the whole animal and its
role in dening behavior.
The institute is operated by a non-prot foundation under private law. The president of the Max Planck
Society chairs the foundation board. Trustors are the Federal Republic of Germany and the Federal
State of North Rhine-Westphalia. Caesar is evaluated by a scientic advisory board. The evaluation
is effected according to the procedures and criteria of the Max Planck Society.
Website: https://www.caesar.de/
City: Bonn
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Photonic
Molecular biology
Microtechnology
Kinetic, microscopic, and spectroscopic methods to study and control cellular activity
Formerly known as Chemical Biology of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
89
Center for Aging Research, The Dartmouth Institute for
Health Policy & Clinical Practice
About:
The Dartmouth Institute is the health services research and education center at Dartmouth College.
They are made up of a diverse group of scholars, researchers, clinicians, students, and administrators
with a wide array of interests and aims. But one thing unites us: They care deeply about health and
health care. They know that good health is the foundation of a happy, productive life and a thriving
community.
Working in partnership with individuals and organizations around the country, and throughout the
world, they are striving to improve population health, reduce disparities, and create high-performing,
sustainable health systems. Whether you are a potential student, research collaborator, health
journalist, supporter, or someone who simply shares our drive to improve health and health care, they
invite you to join them.
At The Dartmouth Institute, they conduct evidence-based research that helps us understand how
health care is actually being practiced—what’s working, what’s not and why. The insights they gain
help policy makers, systems leaders, and health care providers improve practices. They also partner
with health organizations and systems to develop, test, and scale innovative new health interventions
and models of health care delivery.
Website: http://tdi.dartmouth.edu/
City: Hanover /NH
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Foster important research breakthroughs, particularly in the overlapping areas of
biodemography and intergenerational studies, including the transmission of health and longevity.
Offer rst-rate administrative and computing services, including aiding access to the Centers
innovative data collections
Cultivate the next generation of Aging scholars with our cross-discipline postdoctoral and
predoctoral Training Program.
Build a meaningful and permanent joint program of research and training in conjunction with the
Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
90
Center for Aging Research (IU-CAR), Indiana University
About:
IU School of Medicine is the largest medical school in the US and is annually ranked among the top
medical schools in the nation by US News & World Report. The school offers high-quality medical
education, access to leading medical research and rich campus life in nine Indiana cities, including
rural and urban locations consistently recognized for livability.
IU School of Medicine will lead the transformation of healthcare through quality, innovation and
education and make Indiana one of the nation’s healthiest states.
IU School of Medicine is committed to maintaining an academic and clinical environment in which
faculty, fellows, residents, students and staff can work together to further education and research and
provide the highest level of patient care, whether in the classroom, laboratory or clinics. The school’s
goal is to train men and women to meet the highest standards of professionalism and work in an
environment where effective, ethical and compassionate patient care is both expected and provided.
To this end, the school recognizes that each member of the medical school community must be
accepted as an individual and treated with respect and civility.
Diversity in background, outlook and interest is inherent in the practice of medicine, and appreciation
and understanding of such diversity is an important aspect of health care and scientic training. As
part of that training, the school strives to inculcate values of professional and collegial attitudes and
behaviors in interactions among members of the school community and among school members and
patients, their families and community members at-large, that accommodate difference, whether in
age, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities, social, cultural, religious or ethnic values.
Website: https://medicine.iu.edu/research/centers-institutes/aging-research/
City: Indianapolis / IN
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
It is the mission of Indiana University School of Medicine to advance health in the state of Indiana and
beyond by promoting innovation and excellence in education, research and patient care.
Research topics is:
Aging brain - research on late life depression, dementia, and delirium
Gero-informatics - research on the use of information technology
Health promotion - research on self-care, lifestyle, and prevention
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
91
Center for Healthy Aging Research, College of Public
Health & Human Sciences, Oregon State University
About:
The Center for Healthy Aging Research (CHAR) is a community of Oregon State University scholars
committed to investigate and unleash the potential of older adults. Established in 2005 as one of
Oregon State University’s strategic investment initiatives, CHAR has planned, coordinated and
conducted collaborative, multidisciplinary studies designed to optimize the health and well-being of
aging individuals and their families.
The center has attracted many of Oregon State’s most innovative scientists. Researchers from
multiple academic departments, units and centers collaborate in aging research. CHAR also
promotes high-quality professional programs in health care, housing and social support for the aging
population with a focus on interdisciplinary efforts.
The center is committed to expanding, translating and disseminating knowledge of the science of
aging. There are numerous opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students to learn about
aging and receive training in scientic procedures related to their disciplines. From collaborative
research to research colloquia, students experience the science of aging in an interdisciplinary
context. As a vital part of Oregon’s land grant university, CHAR delivers the practical implications
of research ndings to citizens through Extension specialists and eld faculty. The center allows for
the sustaining coordination of efforts designed to go beyond individual research agendas and to
enhance interdisciplinary research at Oregon State University, enhancing the lives of all Oregonians
and worldwide societies.
Website: http://health.oregonstate.edu/healthy-aging
City: Corvallis / OR
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Diet, genes, and aging
Bone health, exercise, and function in aging
Psychosocial factors and optimal aging
Social and ethical issues in technologies for healthy aging
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
92
Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of
Rochester Medical Center
About:
One of the nation’s top academic medical centers, the University of Rochester Medical Center forms
the centerpiece of the University’s health research, teaching, patient care and community outreach
missions. Over the last ve years, the UR School of Medicine and Dentistry has received almost $1.3
billion in total research funding. The School ranks in the top quartile of U.S. academic medical centers
in research funding from the National Institutes of Health, attracting nearly three times the federal
funding received by the medical schools in Albany, Syracuse and Buffalo combined.
The University of Rochester Medical Center is an integrated academic health center that comprises
The School of Medicine and Dentistry, including its faculty practice (University of Rochester Medical
Faculty Group); Strong Memorial Hospital; Highland Hospital; Golisano Children’s Hospital; James P.
Wilmot Cancer Center; School of Nursing; Eastman Dental Center; Visiting Nurse Service; Highlands
at Pittsford; and Highlands at Brighton.
The University’s health care delivery network– UR Medicine – is anchored by Strong Memorial Hospital
- an 800-bed, University-owned teaching hospital which boasts specialty programs that consistently
rank among the best in the nation according to US News & World Report. At URMC, our robust
teaching and research programs transform the patient experience with fresh ideas and approaches
steeped in disciplined science. Here, care is delivered by healthcare professionals who innovate, take
intelligent risks, and care deeply about the lives they touch.
Research faculty have attracted external funding totaling approximately $300 million during the last
scal year
Website: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/neurotherapeutics-discovery.aspx
City: Rochester / NY
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Neural mechanisms in simple model organisms
Protection against of neural insults (HIV infection, stroke, neurodegeneration)
Mechanisms and treatment of neuromuscular and neoplastic disorders
Recovery after traumatic brain injury
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
93
Center for Population Health and Aging (CPHA), Duke
University
About:
CPHA is a highly synergistic interdisciplinary environment for developing faculty and students in
Aging and fostering important research breakthroughs, particularly in the overlapping areas of
biodemography (biological and biomedical demography of aging); and intergenerational studies,
including the transmission of health and longevity.
It was established in 2007 to facilitate research and training at Duke in topics related to Population
Health and Aging. With support from the NIA P30 program, CPHA offers rst-rate administrative and
computing services, including aiding access to the Center’s innovative data collections, and our
members are developing new methods of data collection, matching, and analysis that can increase
the quality and lower the cost of information on aging populations.
They are also cultivating the next generation of Aging scholars by integrating our cross-discipline
postdoctoral and predoctoral Training Program into our Research programs. To further expand
opportunities for scholars at all levels, CPHA is building a meaningful and permanent joint program
of research and training in conjunction with the Carolina Population Center at the University of North
Carolina.
Because aging is a complex and multifaceted process, CPHA research is organized around three major
Research Themes that encompass both traditional demographic approaches and interdisciplinary
collaborations in a wide range of elds to explore all aspects of Aging.
These efforts have led to the creation of Data Collections that are used by researchers worldwide,
as are the many new mathematical and statistical models and methods developed by members of
CPHA’s Biodemography of Aging Research Unit for analyzing and integrating biomedical data and
population data on health and aging.
To keep CPHA members at the forefront of Aging research, they also offer a Pilot Award Program
that takes risks on highly innovative projects. Often these seed grants support primary data collection
efforts that frequently lead to NIH funding to pursue a larger project.
Website: https://cpha.duke.edu/
City: Durham / NC
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
94
Center for Research and Education in Aging (CREA),
University of California
About:
The Center for Research and Education on Aging (CREA) is a joint University of California, Berkeley and
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institution. Their mission is to investigate the basic processes
that cause aging, with the goal of improving and extending human health span. CREA integrates
the efforts of cell and molecular biologists, structural and computational biologists, geneticists,
physiologists and public health professionals, who are the intellectual assets and resources of the
University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
By combining the keen minds of University of California scientists with the steady hands and eager
intellect of its student body, the new Center for Research and Education in Aging (CREA) will rise to
the challenge. CREA is also associated with the Buck Institute for Age Research, a private nonprot
basic biomedical research institute located in Novato, California.
This unique partnership brings to the study of aging an approach that most medical schools cannot
marshal because they focus on specic diseases and their treatments. Aging makes us vulnerable to
disease and injury, but we do not know why. Research into the process responsible for aging remains
seriously neglected. CREA is designed to create a research/education environment that fosters basic
aging research and educates the next generations of scientists.
Support for CREA comes from competitive grants and the generosity of private donors. An endowment
for CREA has been established by BioTime, Inc., a Berkeley, California-based biotechnology company,
to better understand the mechanisms of aging and improve medical procedures focused on older
patients.
By integrating the efforts of some of the world’s best academic, government, and biotechnology
industry laboratories, CREA will be a vital source for driving breakthroughs in improving health and
youthfulness.
Website: http://crea.berkeley.edu/
City: Berkeley / CA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Systems biology
Brain imaging
Neuroendocrine changes in the hypothalamus
Creation of bioinformatic systems to study the ageing process
Hormonal changes and ageing
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
95
Center for Research on Aging, School of Medicine,
University of Maryland
About:
The Department of Medicine was established in 1807, the same year the University of Maryland
School of Medicine was chartered. In two centuries, only 14 men have held the esteemed position of
Chair of the Department of Medicine.
The School of Medicine is one of the fastest growing, top-tier biomedical research enterprises in
the world -- with 43 academic departments, centers, institutes, and programs; and a faculty of more
than 3,000 physicians, scientists, and allied health professionals, including members of the National
Academy of Medicine, and a distinguished recipient of the Albert E. Lasker Award in Medical Research.
The School of Medicine faculty, which ranks as the 8th-highest public medical school in research
productivity, is an innovator in translational medicine with 600 active patents and 24 start-up
companies. The School works locally, nationally, and globally, with research and treatment facilities in
36 countries around the world.
Much of the department’s early teaching took place in Davidge Hall, the oldest medical facility in the
country continuously used for medical education. The building’s secret stairways and hidden exits
enabled the students of the early 19th century to escape angry mobs who gathered outside to protest
the use of cadavers as teaching tools. Still used for teaching today, the building is much the same as
it was then, serving as a constant symbol to our students of the rich history of our department.
The Department of Medicine was the rst in the country to offer an in-hospital residency program.
From those rst two residents in 1823, they have grown into a program that now trains hundreds of
residents and fellows in a variety of traditional and emerging specialties. Some of the best doctors in the
world also work as professors for the Department of Medicine, training the next generation of healers
even as they continue to make historic strides in such elds as infectious diseases, rheumatology and
cardiology.
Website: http://www.medschool.umaryland.edu/medicine/Divisions/Division-of-Gerontology--
Geriatric-Medicine/
City: Baltimore / MD
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Rehabilitation
Obesity, Diabetes, and Nutrition
Diseases e.g. cardiovascular disease, cancer, osteoporosis
Health Services and Quality of Life
Free Radicals, Oxidative Stress
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
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Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity,
College of Education & Human Development, Texas A&M
University
About:
The Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity is engaged in ongoing translational
research on nutrition, exercise, and metabolism in relation to aging and the common diseases of
our aging population. These diseases include, cancer, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease (COPD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), mild cognitive impairment/dementia, and autism
spectrum disorder. Translation of knowledge from basic and applied sciences to care and clinical
practice for older adults is the overall goal of their group.
They have the ability to investigate the role of metabolism in the pursuit of healthy aging and are
developing knowledge on how changes in nutrition can affect outcomes in disease and aging. They
focus is on investigating the role of certain macronutrients, the small molecules that make up the
building blocks of the proteins, fats and sugars in metabolism.
Website: http://ctral.org/
City: College Station / TX
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Photonic
Molecular biology
Microtechnology
Kinetic, microscopic, and spectroscopic methods to study and control cellular activity
Formerly known as Chemical Biology of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Metabolic Research at Texas A&M University. Metabolic research is performed at the 23,000
sq ft Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity (CTRAL, www.ctral.org) in the
Department of Health and Kinesiology (HLKN) at Texas A&M in College Station, TX and is a state-
of-the-art translational biomedical research facility to conduct exercise, nutrition and metabolism
related studies. The CTRAL Clinical Research Unit (CRU) accommodates basic and applied
clinical research in humans suitable for single-day, as well as multi-day 24/7 studies. The CTRAL
Human Research Support Core houses a metabolic kitchen, a clean room for clinical preparations,
a laboratory to facilitate STAT blood/tissue processing, a secured data archive system, a secured/
controlled sample storage/biobank and a clinical waste management system.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
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Center for Vital Longevity, University of Texas
About:
Founded in 2010 by Dr. Denise Park and currently led by Dr. Michael Rugg, the Center brings together
an extraordinary group of research scientists who are using advanced brain-imaging technologies and
research techniques in cognitive neuroscience to understand, maintain and improve the vitality of the
aging mind. Cutting-edge research tools that allow them to see both pathology and compensation for
that pathology in living brains aficted with amyloid or tau deposits.
Center scientists are working to identify a neural signature in middle-aged adults that will help
predict who will and will not age well cognitively and who might be at risk of Alzheimer’s disease
long before symptoms appear. They are elucidating how memories are formed and retrieved and
how these processes change with age. And they are investigating the effects of different types of
mental stimulation on memory and cognition in young and older adults. The goal of these wide-
ranging studies is to develop ways to maintain and even enhance the cognitive health and vitality of
current and future generations.
The Center’s facilities, located in Dallas, Texas, include 30,000 square feet of research space including
cognitive testing rooms and laboratories. In addition, investigators conduct functional and structural
neuroimaging studies at facilities in the Advanced Imaging Research Center (AIRC), a collaborative
enterprise between UT Dallas, UT Arlington, and UT Southwestern Medical Center, where the AIRC
is located.
Scientists at the Center for Vital Longevity are engaged in a variety of research studies aimed at
understanding memory, cognitive aging, and Alzheimer’s disease. Their studies combine state-of-
the-art structural and functional neuroimaging technologies with research techniques in cognitive
neuroscience with the aim of elucidating the changes that occur in the brain over a lifetime and how
these changes affect specic cognitive abilities and behaviors.
Results from the center’s breadth of research will be instrumental in developing ways to slow cognitive
aging and prevent or delay the onset of crippling disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease.
Website: http://vitallongevity.utdallas.edu/research/
City: Dallas / TX
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Neuronal and cognitive aging across the entire adult lifespan
Functional Neuroimaging of Memory
Aging mind health
Memory Training and Cognition
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
98
Center on Aging (COA), University of Iowa
About:
Established in 1990 by Kathleen Buckwalter from the College of Nursing, the University of Iowa Center
on Aging (COA) quickly became recognized as a core campus resource facilitating interdisciplinary
education, research, and service efforts dedicated to understanding the aging process and improving
the health and well being of older people. Then, as part of the state of Iowa Public Health initiative
in 1999, the Iowa Board of Regents called on the COA to advance the “health and independence of
elderly Iowans.
In July, 2014, the Center underwent a restructuring and reorganization. They rededicated ourselves
to that early vision of the Board of Regents; the issues, challenges, and opportunities of the aging
population remain their priority.
Research at the University of Iowa has always been a strength, and the research goals of the Center
on Aging capitalize on that strength. The Center on Aging works to assist investigators with expertise
in aging. Their goal is to help advance the research of these successful investigators by providing
resources and support.
The Aging Mind and Brain Initiative (AMBI). The AMBI is a group of investigators that chose to come
to the University of Iowa specically to work on issues related to aging. As faculty members of many
different departments and college throughout the University of Iowa, their strength as individual
investigators is multiplied by their collaborative efforts.
Website: https://aging.uiowa.edu/
City: Iowa City / IA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Interdisciplinary education and research.
Service efforts dedicated to understanding the aging process
Improving the health and wellbeing of older people.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
99
Center on Aging, University of Utan
About:
The Center on Aging has a 40 year history at the University of Utah. Beginning with its origination
in 1972, the Center on Aging has provided educational and research programs in gerontology at the
University of Utah. It has sponsored undergraduate and graduate gerontology certicate programs as
well as a Masters degree program in Gerontology. In addition to its strengths in gerontology education
programs, it is recognized for a well-established research program focused on bereavement, coping
with loss of a spouse and caregiving. In June 2004 its name was changed from the Gerontology
Center to reect a desire to become more comprehensive and expand the scope of its service and
research activities.
A strategic planning process was completed in 2005 resulting in a change in its organizational structure
to position the center to have a broad institutional impact and allow it to become more comprehensive
and interdisciplinary. As a free standing center it is now optimally situated to serve its interdisciplinary
mission and objectives. Dr. Supiano was appointed as its Executive Director upon his move to Utah
in October 2005.
Website: https://aging.utah.edu/
City: Salt Lake City
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Unite aging-related research, education, and clinical research, education, and clinical programs
at the University
Link its faculty and programs
Help people lead longer and more fullling lives
Support the development of multidisciplinary clinical and training programs
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
100
Center on Demography and Economics of Aging (CoA)
About:
The CoA fosters and supports research on aging through the work of their faculty associates and
afliates and through our training programs. They also work closely with other centers within the
Academic Research Centers of NORC at the University of Chicago, such as the Population Research
Center (PRC).
The Center on Demography and Economics of Aging (CoA), directed by Linda Waite, is one of eight
research centers housed within the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) Academic Research
Centers at the University of the Chicago. The CoA was established as an Exploratory Center in 1994
with a P-20 grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Currently, the CoA (Grant P30 AG012857)
is one of fourteen NIA funded Centers across the U.S. which investigate aspects of health and health
care, the societal impact of population aging, and the economic and social circumstances of the
elderly.
The Center supports a highly diverse faculty of 47 research afliates in sociology, economics/
business, the Pritzker School of Medicine, the School of Social Service Administration, and the Harris
School of Public Policy. The research portfolios of faculty members draw upon expertise in medicine,
epidemiology, and the biological and social sciences. The Center has nourished an environment
for research in the demography and economics of aging by providing research support services,
encouraging the development of new research projects and research foci, and facilitating collaborative
research and teaching among scientists working in the eld of aging research.
Website: https://coa.norc.org
City: Chicago
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Social relationships, living arrangements, and family
The social context of aging
Health care research
Biobehavioral pathways
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
101
Centre for Ageing and Mental Health (CAMH)
About:
The Centre for Ageing and Mental Health at Staffordshire University was established in 2005 to provide
research, consultancy and education, promoting innovation in health and social care services for older
people. The Centre brings together researchers, clinicians and other professionals from a variety of
elds to facilitate research and education both nationally and internationally.
Website: http://www.staffs.ac.uk/faculties/health/research/camh/
City: Stafford
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Darzi Dementia Care Pathway Development
Core Competencies for Dementia Care
Workforce Dementia Support Worker
Older Prisoners and Mental Health
The reorganisation of Mental Health Services
The use of “blogs” in end of life care
Safer Criminal Records Bureau recruitment decision making
Memory Clinic Services
Early Intervention in Dementia
Suicide and Older People
The mission of the centre is to provide research, consultancy and education, promoting innovation in
health and social care services for older people.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
102
Centre for Ageing Research (C4AR), Faculty of Health &
Medicine, Lancaster University
About:
The Center on Demography and Economics of Aging (CoA), directed by Linda Waite, is one of eight
research centers housed within the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) Academic Research
Centers at the University of the Chicago. The CoA was established as an Exploratory Center in 1994
with a P-20 grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Currently, the CoA (Grant P30 AG012857)
is one of fourteen NIA funded Centers across the U.S. which investigate aspects of health and health
care, the societal impact of population aging, and the economic and social circumstances of the
elderly.
The CoA aims to: (1) foster an exciting, dynamic intellectual environment for research in the demography
and economics of aging; (2) provide research support services; (3) encourage the development of
new research projects and research foci in the demography and economics of aging; and (4) support
and facilitate the inclusion and analysis of biomeasures of health in new and ongoing projects at the
University of Chicago and elsewhere. It provides support for research projects in four key areas: (1)
social relationships, living arrangements, and family; (2) the social context of aging; (3) health care
research; and (4) biobehavioral pathways.
The Center operates using three cores, which facilitate and support an active program of research
and training: (A) the Administration and Research Support Core, directed by Linda Waite, which
provides general administrative support to Center associates; (B) the Program Development Core,
directed by Kathleen Cagney, consisting of a program of small-scale and pilot projects and support for
new faculty development in aging; and (C) the External Innovative Network Core, directed by Stacy
Tessler Lindau, with a focus on biomarkers in population-based aging research. The Center supports
a highly diverse faculty of 47 research afliates in sociology, economics/business, the Pritzker
School of Medicine, the School of Social Service Administration, and the Harris School of Public
Policy. The research portfolios of faculty members draw upon expertise in medicine, epidemiology,
and the biological and social sciences. The Center has nourished an environment for research in
the demography and economics of aging by providing research support services, encouraging the
development of new research projects and research foci, and facilitating collaborative research and
teaching among scientists working in the eld of aging research.
Website: http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fhm/research/centre-for-ageing-research/
City: Lancashire
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Neuro-generative diseases (Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease)
Molecular changes associated with the ageing process
Design and development of new technologies to support and enhance the health and wellbeing
of older people and their care-givers
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
103
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology
(CCACE), University of Edinburgh
About:
The Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh (CCACE)
focuses on the reciprocal inuences of cognition and health across the human life course. The Centre
is funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Biotechnology and biological Sciences
Research Council (BBSRC). The Centre’s mission is to elucidate the routes to the vulnerable ageing
brain, and thus provide information to prevent or ameliorate cognitive disability and its negative
consequences for health and wellbeing; to determine the mechanisms by which lower cognitive ability
through the lifecourse renders the body vulnerable to ill health and impaired wellbeing; and to provide
an outstanding environment for interdisciplinary research training in cognitive ageing and cognitive
epidemiology.
Scientic Objectives:
1. Maintain, develop and exploit the unique long-term human cohort studies assembled in Scotland
as new national resources to explore lifecourse inuences on cognitive ageing and pathways whereby
cognitive ability in early life affects later health—cognitive epidemiology.
2. Advance knowledge by research into biological, neurological, genetic, social, economic, and
psychological aspects of cognitive ageing in humans and lifecourse mammalian model systems.
3. Develop and evaluate psychological, genetic, other biological, and brain imaging methods to
assess, monitor, and prevent or ameliorate decline in mental functions with a view to providing a
rational basis for translating this into potential interventions.
4. Build upon MSc courses unique to our Centre, exploiting the university’s resources in innovative
methods such as e-learning, to train an essential and novel kind of researcher capable of accessing
the best technologies to maximise opportunities for working in multidisciplinary teams in cognitive
aging and cognitive epidemiology across clinical and basic science.
Website: http://www.ccace.ed.ac.uk
City: Edinburgh
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Cognitive epidemiology
Cognitive ageing
Mechanisms of cognitive ageing
Human and animal brain imaging
Genetics and statistics of brain ageing
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
104
Centre for Education and Research on Ageing (CERA),
Concord Repatriation General Hospital, University of
Sydney
About:
The Centre for Education and Research on Ageing (CERA) is Australia’s premier academic organization
for the study of ageing and age-related diseases. Through innovative and multidisciplinary research,
CERA aims to expand and share knowledge of human ageing, so that the health and quality of life of
older people can be improved.
Their research is achieved through a broad program that incorporates clinical, laboratory,
epidemiological and health service evaluation approaches. Allied to this are education programs, at
basic and advanced levels of practice, in geriatric medicine and other education programs for aged
care workers from a range of professional settings.
CERA is a joint facility of the University of Sydney, Sydney Medical School and Concord Repatriation
General Hospital, a teaching hospital within Sydney Local Health Network. CERA is located at Concord
Repatriation General Hospital, in the inner west of Sydney, Australia.
Vision:
To be the national leader in, and internationally recognized for, ageing research
To undertake and promote multidisciplinary research that will lead to improvement in the quality
of life of older people
To provide quality education in ageing from the undergraduate to professional levels
To contribute to health services for older people through evidence-based practices and
application of research advances
To promote ageing in the broader community and provide advocacy for the needs of older
people.
Website: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/research/units/cera/index.php
City: Concord
Country: Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
CERA’s aim is to expand and share knowledge of human ageing through collaborative,
multidisciplinary research and education with the purposes of:
Promoting healthy ageing
Minimising the impact of disease and disability on older people
Improving the quality of life of our older population
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
105
Centre for Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology (ZGGF),
Medical School, University of Freiburg
About:
The Centre for Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology (ZGGF) comprises consultants from internal
medicine, neurology, and psychiatry to provide expert outpatient service for patients with age-
associated disorders. The ZGGF is a centre of excellence for the diagnosis and treatment of memory
disorders. The Memory Clinic as part of the ZGGF provides diagnostic services for more than 400 new
patients per annum from Germany and abroad. The high-level diagnostic facilities include magnetic
resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) with several tracers including amyloid
imaging for Alzheimers disease, cerebrospinal uid (CSF) analysis, and extensive psychological
assessment conducted by neuropsychologists. The centre serves as a clinical core centre of the
German Competence Network Dementia (KND) and takes part in the research within the German
Competence Network Degenerative Dementias (KNDD). Several investigator-initiated or industry-
funded randomized controlled trials have been successfully performed. The Out-patient Geriatric Clinic
and Geriatric Rehabilitation center of the ZGGF, provides diagnostic services for more than 300 new
patients per year from Freiburg and Südbaden. ZGGF´s staff consists of board-certied physicians
who specialize in treating the specic problems related to older adults. The staff also includes:
A clinical nurse specialist in geriatrics
A social worker dedicated to helping people cope with the problems that sometimes confront older
adults
A physiotherapy-department, responsible for estimating the risk of falls and treat the ambulatory
and balance
An occupational therapy-department, in authority to assess and treat the decreases in activities
of daily living
A neuropsychology department to account for cognitive testings
A logopedics-department who investigates impairment in speech or swallowing.
Website: https://www.uniklinik-freiburg.de/zggf.html
City: Freiburg
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Image analysis of the disordered brain
Molecular analysis of Alzheimer‘s Disease
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI)
Posterior cortical atrophy
Speech processing problems related to Alzheimer‘s Disease
Stress-induced functional concentration and memory impairment
Vascular dementias, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE, Binswanger‘s disease)
Evaluation of dementia therapies
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
106
Centre for Innovative Ageing (CIA), Swansea University
About:
The Centre for Innovative Ageing (CIA) is a centre of excellence for research and training in the study
of ageing and provides the infrastructure, focus, leadership and support for ageing research and
scholarship across the University’s Academic Colleges. Its underlying philosophy is a positive holistic
view of ageing with older people at its core.
The standing and reputation of the Centre’s research activity is highly acclaimed. It has achieved
international recognition for its work in social and environmental gerontology as a collaborating centre
of excellence and a global leader in research by the International Association of Gerontology and
Geriatrics (IAGG). Members of the Centre work with other centres in the UK, Europe, Africa, the
USA, Canada, South Asia, Australia and New Zealand as collaborators, consultants or advisors for
international projects.
The Centre’s Director, Professor Vanessa Burholt, represents the UK on the Management Board of EU
COST Action Reducing Old-Age Social Exclusion: Collaborations in Research and Policy (ROSEnet).
She is also an elected member of the Ministerial Advisory Forum on Ageing, a Senior Research
Leader for Health and Care Research Wales, and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences as well
as being an invited member of the International Network on Rural Ageing.
The Centre is the only one of its kind in Wales, identifying gaps in ageing research and generating new
interdisciplinary knowledge in the eld of ageing. The CIA has a philosophy of translating research
into practice, achieved through active interaction with policy makers, managers and practitioners.
The Centre fosters collaboration between business and academia, with the intention of multiplying
the benets of public and private investment in knowledge. As a result, health and social care policy
makers and employers have a robust evidence base to inform care delivery and policy making while
Welsh industry and business is well-placed to develop products and services that meet the changing
requirements and expectations of the ageing population.
Website: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/humanandhealthsciences/research/centres-and-groups/centre-
for-innovative-ageing/
City: Swansea
Country: UKл имммммлмилблльльлььь
Mission/Research Topics:
Civic and social engagement and participation of older people (e.g.: intergenerational
relationships, social and support networks)
Environments of ageing (e.g.: natural and built physical space, functional design)
Care provision for older people (e.g.: social care, health care, residential care)
Chronic conditions, falls and prevention in old age (e.g.: falls, stroke, cancer, dementia)
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
107
Centre for Integrated Research into Musculoskeletal
Ageing (CIMA), University of Liverpool
About:
The MRC-Arthritis Research UK Centre for Integrated research into Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA),
is a collaboration between researchers and clinicians at the Universities of Liverpool, Shefeld and
Newcastle. Established in 2012, CIMA aims to understand why our bone, joints and muscles function
less well as we age, and why older people develop clinical diseases of these musculoskeletal tissues,
such as arthritis or osteoporosis.
The Centre brings together complementary and specialist expertise in skeletal muscle, bone, cartilage
and tendon biology, ageing research, nutrition and exercise interventions, and clinical excellence
in musculoskeletal disorders. Through an innovative, comprehensive and sustainable research
programme, and through training the next generation of researchers, CIMA is developing an integrative
approach to:
Understand the processes and effects of ageing in tissues of the musculoskeletal system
Understand how ageing contributes to diseases of the musculoskeletal system
Understand how these processes may be ameliorated or prevented to help preserve the mobility
and independence of older people.
Website: http://www.cimauk.org
City: Liverpool
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Skeletal muscle, bone, cartilage and tendon biology
Ageing research
Nutrition and exercise interventions
Clinical excellence in musculoskeletal disorders
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
108
Centre for Integrated Systems Biology of Ageing and
Nutrition (CISBAN), Newcastle University
About:
CISBAN is a multidisciplinary research centre within Newcastle University. It is particularly closely
associated with the Institute for Ageing and Health, with which it shares buildings on the Campus for
Ageing and Vitality. Its staff members come mainly from the Faculty of Medical Sciences, the School
of Computing Science and the School of Mathematics and Statistics.
Their research aims to develop an understanding of the biology of ageing and ageing-related diseases
using a systems approach. The way nutrients are used by the body and what nutrients are consumed
have been implicated as major inuences on longevity.
However, there are multiple causes and mechanisms of ageing. Each mechanism may make only a
modest contribution to the whole. By taking a systems-wide approach, CISBAN seeks to capture the
whole picture of what drives the ageing process, not simply a limited view of the contributing factors.
In addition to traditional and high throughput laboratory techniques, CISBAN uses a number of modelling
and software systems. Very large amounts of data are generated through a range of experimental
studies and analysed in silico. This process provides a highly dynamic cycle of interaction between
theoretical and experimental activity.
Website: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/cisban/
City: Newcastle upon Tyne
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Cell senescence
Dietary restriction
Modelling
Software development (e.g.: Saint, SyMBA)
Other projects (e.g.: Oxidative stress and telomerase in stem cells)
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
109
Centre for Research on Ageing (CRA)
About:
Population ageing brings new challenges for individuals and policymakers alike. Understanding
ageing over the life course is at the heart of such challenges.
The Centre for Research on Ageing examines key issues in ageing across the life course. Their
members of staff are engaged in high-quality postgraduate teaching in gerontology and cutting-edge
research in the eld. They offer postgraduate programmes, face-to-face or by distance learning,
which equip students with substantive knowledge of policy-relevant issues in gerontology and with
quantitative and qualitative research methods training.
Through high quality research, the Centre contributes to a better understanding of the experience of
ageing amongst different groups and societies, which will in turn place us in a better strategic position
to improve the quality of life of older people.
In addition to research, the Centre contributes to capacity building of future academics and professionals
by teaching different postgraduate programmes in Gerontology.
Website: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/ageing/index.page?
City: Southampton
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Ageing in developing and transitional societies
Diversity in later life and the ageing of ethnic minority communities
Economic and social resources in old age
Inequalities in later life, particularly with respect to health and access to health and social care
services
Quality of life
Retirement prospects of future generations of elders
Social networks and informal support
Developing a range of tools for policy analysis
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
110
Centre for Research on Ageing (CRA), Curtin University of
Technology
About:
Curtin University is Western Australia’s largest and most culturally diverse university with Australia’s
third largest international student population.
Since their inception, they have taken an innovative approach towards teaching and research.
Their campuses are vibrant, welcoming spaces that value diversity and difference, emphasise industry
connections and practical learning, have a strong commitment to social justice, and foster a forward-
thinking culture for our students, staff and the wider community.
In line with developments in Perth, they are beginning to transform our main Bentley Campus into a
cultural hub where members of the community can live, study, work and socialise together as part of
the Greater Curtin project.
As they move into their 50 years of innovation, our renewed focus will be on delivering excellence and
strengthening our position as a leading global university, according to our vision, mission and values.
Website: http://www.curtin.edu.au/
City: Perth
Country: Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
With a breadth of research activity, the Faculty of Health Sciences works across disciplines and beyond
the University, connecting the brightest minds to nd innovative solutions to the world’s greatest health
challenges. They offer pioneering taught courses, which draw upon our leading research and strong
links to global industry. Research students study with experienced researchers in innovative facilities
acquiring the knowledge and skills to help them advance health and wellbeing around the world,
focusing on:
ageing
chronic disease
Indigenous health
mental health
population health
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
111
Centre for Research on Ageing and Gender (CRAG),
University Surrey
About:
The Centre for Research on Ageing and Gender (CRAG) brings together social scientic expertise
to conduct policy relevant research on gender and ageing and their intersection with other forms of
social division, identity and (in)equality.
CRAG focuses specically on the intersections between gender and ageing, in addition to other
aspects of social division, identity and inequality, such sexuality, social class and ethnicity.
The principal aim is to advance understanding of how gender inuences the experience of ageing,
and how ageing inuences gender roles and relationships.
Website: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/sociology/research/researchcentres/crag/
City: Guildford
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Undertaking research on gender and ageing. CRAG members have expertise in a range of
research methodologies, including qualitative research, evaluation research, and secondary
analysis of large national data sets
Collaborating on interdisciplinary projects with psychologists, nutritionists, economists, bio-
medical scientists, and health specialists
Taking an holistic approach, which emphasises the interconnections between health, income and
material resources, and social roles and relationships, and how these vary according to gender
difference and diversity
Adopting a life course approach, which links socio-economic position, roles and relationships in
later life to the earlier biographies and intersectionality,which addresses mutliple axes of inequality,
power and privilege
Encouraging scientic exchange through honorary visiting research positions for international
scholars. In Spring 2015 CRAG was delighted to host Professor Mark Hughes, Southern Cross
University, Australia
Providing opportunities for doctoral research students in a stimulating research environment
Collaborating with user groups, activists and advocates concerned with the well-being of all older
people
Organising and participating in conferences, seminars and workshops which disseminate research
ndings to the academic community, professional groups and wider publics
Developing a media prole for exchange and dissemination of information and research ndings.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
112
Centre for Research on Personhood in Dementia (CRPD),
University of British Columbia
About:
The Center for Research on Personhood in Dementia (CRPD) is a BC-based virtual research centre
located at UBC (Vancouver campus). Led by co-directors Deborah O’Connor (Social Work) and Alison
Phinney (Nursing), the CRPD serves as a hub for research generation, training, and knowledge
application around issues of personhood and citizenship in dementia. The CRPD includes researchers
located at UBC and other universities in British Columbia.
They conduct theoretical and applied research aimed at understanding and supporting personhood
and citizenship in dementia. Their work is situated in three intersecting domains: lived experiences,
interactional environments, and socio-cultural contexts.
The CRPD provides an interdisciplinary home for students, post-doctoral researchers, and visiting
scholars who are conducting research on topics related to personhood and citizenship in dementia.
They are a vibrant scholarly community with connections across BC, Canada, and internationally.
They also work with an active network of community partners to help translate and mobilize new
knowledge into real life settings.
Website: http://crpd.ubc.ca
City: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Serve as a virtual research centre located at UBC (Vancouver campus).
Research generation, training, and knowledge application around issues of personhood and
citizenship in dementia.
The mission of the CRPD is to initiate, facilitate, and integrate trans-disciplinary research that increases
understanding and implementation of personhood approaches to dementia and dementia care. It
aims to increase understanding of personhood in dementia and develop interventions for supporting
personhood.
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Centre Hospitalier Aflié Universitaire de Québec (CHA)
About:
In a world where health needs are constantly and rapidly increasing, and where scientic and
technological innovation has the lion’s share of the collective wealth of modern societies, the CHU
Research Center (CRCHU) in Quebec City ‘is already distinguished by the quality and originality of
its different teams of researchers, both in the fundamental sector and translational and clinical. This
Strategic Research Development Plan is guided by an already proven philosophy that excellence and
performance are the key to success in the scientic community and constitute the benchmark against
which researchers are evaluated by their peers.
Inspired by the people who animate its daily life, the CHU of Québec-Université Laval (CHU) strives for
excellence and offers humanistic care and services to the public. Engaged and innovative, his teams
concentrate their efforts on the benet of the person. They shape the care of today and tomorrow,
train the next generation, contribute to cutting-edge research, and evaluate health technologies and
practices. With recognized vision and knowledge, the UHC contributes to numerous projects in the
elds of health, science, knowledge sharing and economic and social development.
Afliated with Laval University, the University Hospital of Quebec-Laval University (CHU) provides
general, specialized and highly specialized health care and services, integrating teaching, clinical and
basic research and technology evaluation. modes of intervention in health.
The CHU offers a full range of general, specialized and subspecialized care. Their teams are
recognized here and elsewhere for the quality of their expertise . They have developed very specic
knowledge in several specialties. Moreover, in Quebec, some care is only provided in our hospitals!
They also offer a full range of high quality general and specialized care to the people of eastern
Quebec and parts of northeastern New Brunswick, a pool of nearly 2 million people.
Website: https://www.chudequebec.ca/accueil.aspx
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Endocrinology and nephrology
Infectious and Immune Diseases
Regenerative medicine
Neuroscience
Oncology
Reproduction, health of mother and child
Public health and best practices in health
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Centre on Aging, University of Manitoba
About:
The Centre on Aging, University of Manitoba, was established on July 1, 1982, with a mandate to
serve as a focal point for the conduct of research on aging. The Centre has developed a national and
international reputation for excellence in research.
The experiences of aging individuals and the dynamics of an aging society are investigated using
rigorous scientic standards. Community representatives contribute to projects, and the Centre
distributes its ndings to administrators, policy makers, practitioners, and seniors to assist them in
making decisions.
The Centre on Aging believes listening to older adults and those who work with them ensures more
appropriate research. Dialogue is encouraged through:
An annual spring symposium which brings together researchers and community representatives;
Informal seminars on current research and future directions;
Public lectures by internationally renowned researchers;
Newsletter published three times each year.
The Centre with its partners generates, supports, and promotes interdisciplinary research on aging at
Manitoba universities to improve the lives of older adults, their family, caregivers, and communities.
Website: http://umanitoba.ca/centres/aging/
City: Winnipeg
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Chronic health problems (dementia, arthritis, depression)
Consequences of early brain damage to normal aging,
Changes in memory function with advancing age
Neuronal plasticity
Memory encoding/impairments after stroke, trauma, and seizure activity
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Centre on Aging, University of Victoria
About:
The Institute on Aging and Lifelong Health at the University of Victoria is a multidisciplinary research
centre. The institute takes a leading role in developing and rening research skills and mentoring the
next generation of researchers and community-minded citizens.
Much of their work is rooted in a broad orientation to health that includes attention to the social,
psychological, environmental, and cultural contexts in which people live, as well as the institutions
responsible for the health of aging populations. They recognize that aging is a life-long process that
requires attention to developmental changes that occur across the life span.
Their overall goals are to contribute to improving the health and quality of life of an increasingly diverse
population of older adults, and to assist their families, heath care providers, and the government in
meeting the challenges and potentials of an aging society.
In order to achieve these broad goals, the institute has as its specic objectives:
To add to the body of knowledge on aging and health by stimulating and conducting rigorous basic
and applied research.
To provide a focus and direction to the University’s and region’s research activities in the area of
aging and health.
To facilitate communication and collaboration among scholars, practitioners, government ofcials,
and older adults.
To contribute to the training of skilled research personnel which includes promoting and facilitating
post-doctoral, graduate and undergraduate training within the area of aging and health.
To mobilize knowledge on aging and health with scientists, practitioners, and the public.
To promote the translation of research ndings into interventions, services, products, and policies
relevant to older adults.
Website: https://www.uvic.ca/research/centres/aging/
City: Victoria
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Needs assessments
Social surveys
Expreimental research
Program evaluations
Development of clinical diagnostic tools
Social policy research
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Clinical Ageing Research Unit (CARU)
About:
The Clinical Ageing Research Unit (CARU) is a £5.5 million clinical research facility funded by the
Wellcome Trust and Wolfson Foundation.
They opened in September 2008 and are located on the University’s Campus for Ageing and Vitality.
Their primary aim is to facilitate the development of early assessment and intervention strategies
targeted at age-associated degenerative conditions.
They provide a high quality, patient-friendly environment for phase II-IV clinical studies in the older
patient. They employ experienced research nurses with specic training in commonly used, relevant
assessment instruments.
Clinical trials are supported by a high quality research infrastructure, embedded within the joint Acute
Trust-University research system, with a study coordinator and data manager located on site.
The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Newcastle University were jointly
awarded the NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) status by the National Institute
for Health Research. The NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre aims to improve the lives
of the growing number of older people through translational research into ageing syndromes and
long-term conditions. Research themes comprise dementia, liver disease, musculoskeletal Disease,
neuromuscular disease, skin and oral disease.
And syndromes common to the older population, such as stroke and cardiovascular ageing, visual
failure and diabetes.
CARU has a key role in delivering studies falling within these research themes.
Website: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/caru/
City: Newcastle upon Tyne
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Dementia and neurodegenerative diseases
Stroke and cardiovascular ageing
Musculoskeletal disease
Visual failure
Type 2 Diabetes
Liver disease
Mitochondrial disease
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Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer‘s Disease Center
(CNADC)
About:
With decades of experience studying dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, the CNADC has a wealth of
knowledge at its ngertips. The director of the Center, Dr. M.-Marsel Mesulam, is a world-renowned
researcher in Alzheimer’s disease, behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and primary
progressive aphasia (PPA), a condition that Dr. Mesulam identied in the 1980’s. The Northwestern
Alzheimer’s Disease Center is one of the prestigious 30 research institutions in the Alzheimer’s
Disease Centers Program of the National Institute on Aging, one of the National Institutes of Health.
Many of the afliated researchers have national and world-wide recognition.
The Human Cognitive Brain Mapping Program, genetics studies, and experimental treatments are
all part of the cutting-edge research conducted at the CNADC. Using powerful imaging technology,
researchers are able to visualize areas of the brain that are activated during mental exercises in
real time. Researchers study healthy and abnormal human brains to discover how and where
neurodegenerative disease affects the brain and why there are different types of symptoms in different
people. Research is ongoing at the Center and its afliated laboratories on the chemistry of memory,
the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease, the causes and treatments of PPA and bvFTD,
and the nature of cognitive and behavioral changes in Alzheimer’s disease.
Breakthroughs are made every day. And researchers use their knowledge to benet the patients
they see in the CNADC.
Website: http://www.brain.northwestern.edu/
City: Guildford
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
To provide the highest quality clinical care, i.e., diagnostic evaluation and Treatment
To conduct research on how the brain coordinates mental functions
To transfer the benets of research to aficted patients
To train researchers and clinicians to work in this eld
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European Research Institute for the Biology of Ageing
(ERIBA)
About:
The mission of the ERIBA is to better understand what causes ageing. The studies are focused on the
mechanisms that result in loss of cells with age and the decline in the function of old cells and tissues.
ERIBA aims to develop novel strategies to prevent or combat age-related disease and to provide
evidence-based recommendations for healthy ageing.
Healthy ageing is a lifelong process that starts even before conception, with parents who pass on their
genes and with them the risks and opportunities for a healthy life course, or the occurrence of illness
later in life. Lifestyle, food patterns and environmental factors inuence the development of health.
However, new knowledge is required about the inuence of these factors, and how they interact with
one another
Research into ageing calls for a multidisciplinary approach. In Groningen Healthy Ageing is seen as a
joint research challenge for the UMCG, the University of Groningen, the Hanze University of Applied
Sciences, and various regional, national and international partners.
The multidisciplinary research extends from fundamental biological and (pre)clinical research through
to applied research into social-societal effects of disease and health. In this way results can be
translated rapidly into adequate and/or improved prevention and treatment methods. This in turn
leads to new products in the eld of medication and medical technology for making diagnoses, and
for example for the development of new nutritional products – another aspect in which this research
is of vital importance.
Website: https://www.umcg.nl/NL/Zorg/paginas/Default.aspx
City: Groningen
Country: Netherlands
Mission/Research Topics:
Investigate how extra years of life can be spent in good health.
Primary prevention (preventing disease).
Secondary prevention (timely discovery, treatment and slowing down progression).
Tertiary prevention (preventing recurrence and aggravation, focusing on job retention).
Work with knowledge institutions at home and abroad, regional governments and companies
to develop knowledge and translate that knowledge into concrete products and services for the
patient, consumer and healthcare professionals.
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Geriatrics Center & Institute of Gerontology
About:
The University of Michigan Geriatrics Center seeks to increase the span of healthy, active life for older
adults through interdisciplinary clinical care, education, research and community service.
Created by the Regents of the University of Michigan in 1987, the Geriatrics Center was established
to enhance geriatrics-related research, education and patient care by improving interaction and
cooperation among faculty representing various Schools and Institutes at the University. Today,
nearly 300 afliated faculty are principal investigators on grants totaling approximately $79 million
annually. These faculty represent various units in the University including the Medical School, School
of Nursing, School of Social Work, Institute of Gerontology, School of Public Health, Dental School,
Institute for Social Research, Mental Health Research Institute, Kresge Hearing Research Institute,
College of Engineering, and College of Literature, Science and the Arts. The primary goals of the
University of Michigan Geriatrics Center are:
To strengthen the U-M environment for training of future academic leaders in geriatrics.
To stimulate multidisciplinary research of important healthcare problems of older patients.
To enhance the productivity of currently funded research.
To provide exemplary multidisciplinary patient care for older adults.
To provide outstanding training opportunities for trainees and healthcare professionals from a
variety of disciplines involved in caring for the elderly population.
To establish and maintain a highly-visible, nationally-recognized facility dedicated to geriatrics.
Website: http://www.med.umich.edu/geriatrics/index.htm
City: Ann Arbor
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Biogerontology
Biomechanics and mobility
Ageing populations (understand risk factors and outcomes of diseases)
Clinical and translational research (age-related diseases)
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120
Gerontology Research Institute at the University of
Massachusetts Boston
About:
The Gerontology Institute carries out basic and applied social and economic research on aging and
engages in public education on aging policy issues, with an emphasis in four areas: income security,
health (including long-term care), productive aging (including transportation), and basic social and
demographic research on aging. The Institute’s work on income security includes active participation
in the national debate on Social Security reform. The Institute’s research in this area includes minority
participation in private pensions, reverse-equity mortgages, and income adequacy for elders. The
Institute’s Pension Action Center offers counseling for citizens on their pension rights.
Long-Term Care Projects include analysis of options to strengthen long-term care nancing, the
development of improved measurements of the quality of long-term care, and technical assistance to
the Massachusetts Legislature and the Executive Ofce of Elder Affairs on long-term care policy and
program development. The Institute’s work on productive aging focuses attention on employment,
volunteer and educational opportunities for older adults, and transportation issues for older adults.
Work in these areas has included a demonstration concerned with age discrimination in employment,
a demonstration to assist councils on aging to develop stronger volunteer programs, and promoting
safe mobility and alternatives for elders who have stopped driving.
The Institute’s work on social demography includes research on the changing age composition in
Massachusetts and in the U.S., educational attainments of Massachusetts elders, characteristics of
householders and homeowners ages 65 and older, among other topics.
The Institute provides editorial leadership for the Journal of Aging & Social Policy, a peer-reviewed,
quarterly journal published by Taylor-Francis. The Journal is distinguished by its emphasis on policy
and its attention to international developments. Support for Educational Programs in Gerontology.
The Institute has a close relationship with the University’s undergraduate and graduate Gerontology
programs. Senior Institute personnel teach in the PhD program in Gerontology. The Institute provides
apprenticeship opportunities for graduate students. Gerontology faculty members are active in
conducting research in the Institute.
Website: https://www.umb.edu/gerontologyinstitute
City: Boston / MA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Basic and applied social and economic research on aging
Engaging in public education on aging policy issues: income security, health (including long-
term care), productive aging (including transportation), and basic social and demographic
research on aging.
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.Analysis of options to strengthen long-term care nancing,
Development of improved measurements of the quality of long-term care
Technical assistance to the Massachusetts Legislature and the Executive Ofce of Elder Affairs
on long-term care policy and program development.
Research on the changing age composition in Massachusetts and in the U.S., educational
attainments of Massachusetts elders, characteristics of householders and homeowners ages 65
and older, among other topics.
Editorial leadership for the Journal of Aging & Social Policy, a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal
published by Taylor-Francis.
Support for Educational Programs in Gerontology.
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122
Institut für Gerontologische Forschung IGFe.v.
About:
The Institute for Gerontological Research (IGF) is an independent and interdisciplinary research
institute located in Berlin and Munich. For more than 30 years they team has been researching aspects
of the “ageing society”. Their aim is to identify and promote approaches, methods and frameworks
that enable people to continue to lead independent lives as they grow older.
They believe that the successful development and realisation of sustainable concepts requires a
cooperative process involving all relevant stakeholders. The same also applies to tackling the
challenges presented by resurgent old-age poverty, ageing migrant communities, the rise in dementia,
and soaring demand for qualied carers and nursing staff.
They develop empirically grounded research and concepts using a broad spectrum of sociological
methods, and participate in successful research alliances and networks. They ndings and
recommendations address the full spectrum of opportunities for change, from governance and
management through healthcare and social work procedure to design, architecture and planning. In
our research projects they also make a point of collaborating with partners working in the eld: social
services, vocational training, housing associations, senior citizens’ groups, and political gures at the
municipal, state and national level.
Website: http://www.brain.northwestern.edu/
City: Munich
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Research aspects of the “ageing society”.
Identify and promote approaches, methods and frameworks that enable people to continue to
lead independent lives as they grow older.
Develop empirically grounded research and concepts using a broad spectrum of sociological
methods, and participate in successful research alliances and networks.
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123
Institute for Aging Research (IFAR)
About:
For more than 50 years, the Institute for Aging Research has initiated hundreds of studies that
challenge health-related assumptions commonly associated with aging. Their ndings have a direct
and positive impact on the standard of care and quality of life for seniors around the world.
IFAR is one of the largest gerontological research facilities in a clinical setting in the U.S. They are
a research afliate of HarvaFor more than 50 years, the Institute for Aging Research has initiated
hundreds of studies that challenge health-related assumptions commonly associated with aging. They
ndings have a direct and positive impact on the standard of care and quality of life for seniors around
the world.
Their decades-long relationship with Harvard Medical School has attracted expert teaching staff and
top-notch research fellows. Their research portfolio ranks us in the top 15% of institutions funded
by the National Institutes of Health, and ranks number one among hospital-based geriatric research
facilities.
Because IFAR operates within the Hebrew SeniorLife system, their researchers work in close proximity
to more than 3,000 seniors each day, many of whom volunteer to participate in our studies. Their
needs, struggles, and challenges drive their work. And their results are used to develop services,
programs, and best practices in the treatment of common conditions associated with aging. As a part
of Hebrew SeniorLife, their goal is to further their shared mission to redene the aging experience.
Website: https://www.instituteforagingresearch.org/
City: Boston
Country: USA / MA
Mission/Research Topics:
Cognitive impairment
Mental health and ageing
Musculoskeletal disorders
Palliative care
Quality of care and health care standards
Syncope and falls
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124
Institute for Biomedical Aging Research (IBA)
About:
Worldwide, the segment of the population aged 60 or over is increasing rapidly. In the year 2006, in
Austria, more than one-fth of our population has been over 60 years of age. In 2030 this segment
will amount to one third. These senior citizens will place an enormous personal and socioeconomic
burden on their families and on our society unless we act quickly to develop better prevention and
treatment programs for many of the physical and mental ailments associated with old age. The goal of
biomedical research on aging is to help people grow old with dignity and in good health.
The IBA has the following specic research goals:
(a) to study aging processes at the molecular, cellular, and organismic level in order better to
understand age-related changes and impairments;
(b) to dene measures to postpone/prevent age-related problems to improve the quality of life in old
age.
Website: https://www.uibk.ac.at/iba/
City: Innsbruck
Country: Austria
Mission/Research Topics:
Endocrinology
Immunology
Molecular and Cell Biology
Stem Cell Ageing
Adipose Tissue and Oncoproteins
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125
Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine and
Ageing Research (IBIMA)
About:
The core interest of the Bioinformatics department is the investigation of intervention effects using
gene expression (next-generation sequencing) data. For example, they predicted which drugs
may be repositioned to inhibit brosis after glaukoma surgery (BMBF validation research project),
and validated the top-ranking compound in vitro. Moreover, they wish to discover the healthspan
pathways triggered by interventions proposed to enable healthy ageing (EU Horizon 2020 project).
Also, they work with Leukemia, Parkinson, and Alzheimer data, among others. The Bioinformatics
department is composed of the following groups: Medical Bioinformatics (Moeller, Fuellen), focussed
on intervention effects, Junior Research Group Integrative OMICS Analyses (Hamed), and next-
generation sequencing data (Barrantes).
Website: http://139.30.163.40/IBIMA/index.php
City: Rostock
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
The tasks of the Department of Biostatistics of Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine
and Ageing Research of the University Clinical Centre Rostock are
1. Applications and developments of statistical methodology for all areas of fundamental and patient-
orientated medical research.
2. Findings of medical researcher has worked out with suitable correct methodology. Therefore,
Biostatistics contributes by accurate planning, purposeful collection and preparation of required data
as well as adequate statistical analysis to a appropriate interpretation of obtained research results.
3. Fundamental for their work is the interdisciplinary. Therefore, they put value to a pronounced
competency of our staff members to cooperation with medical research partners, to a fair and friendly
conduct of talks and to simple presentation of complex mathematical themes.
4. The Department Biostatistics supports the process of transfer of existing knowledge into medical
practice. Thereby, it performs a valuable contribution to the continuous improvement of patient care in
the university hospital and beyond.
5. By imparting of knowledge of methodical principles of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology they
create an important qualication for a professional activity for the purpose of evidence-based medicine
(EbM)
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126
Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological
Disorders (UCI MIND)
About:
The UC Irvine Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders (UCI MIND) is
internationally recognized for its research accomplishments in age-related brain disorders. UCI MIND
is the University’s center for aging and dementia research, with our faculty seeking to understand the
causes leading to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, Lewy
body dementia, and Huntington’s disease.
For more than 30 years, UCI MIND has been at the forefront of Alzheimer’s disease research. It is
home to one of 30 Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers (ADRC) funded by the National Institute on
Aging (NIA), a branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and one of 10 California Alzheimer’s
Disease Centers funded by the California Department of Public Health.
Website: https://www.mind.uci.edu/
City: Irvine
Country: USA / CA
Mission/Research Topics:
The mission of UCI MIND is to enhance the quality of life for older adults by researching genetic,
clinical, and lifestyle factors that promote successful brain aging. Toward this end, UCI MIND engages
in a variety of activities, some of which are listed below:
Conduct longitudinal research that follows individuals with and without cognitive impairment to
evaluate their clinical, neuropsychological, and biological changes over time
Perform clinical trials of promising investigational medicines, lifestyle interventions, and other
treatment modalities
Share biological resources such as human brain tissue, serum, DNA, and cerebrospinal uid from
well-characterized clinical subjects with researchers worldwide
Deliver community outreach with the goal of public education and increased participation in
research
Train and educate the next generation of clinicians and scientists in the elds of brain aging and
neurodegeneration
Stimulate research through individual and collaborative grants and philanthropy
Sponsor seminars and meetings to promote scholarship and information exchange
Partner with community-based organizations serving individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and
related dementias to provide scientic and clinical expertise.
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127
Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease Research
About:
The Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease is using world-class research to improve the quality of life
of millions of people on an international scale.
They want to understand the mechanisms of ageing – from the cellular to the muscular skeletal – to
nd the ways to delay its onset, and to mitigate its effects. Understanding how and why aging happens
leads to an understanding of how to intervene.
They are nding new insights into musculoskeletal biology and eye and vision sciences, as well as
examining functions like movement, metabolism and sight.
They do that in the laboratory and at the bedside, looking at the impact of lifestyle and patient
behaviour, as well bioscience and epidemiology, nding the risk factors which can cause disease, and
then nding better prevention measures and methods of care.
They research translates into real benets for people and animals of all ages - from unique approaches
to prevent muscle wasting in intensive care patients, a retina scan to detect cerebral malaria in African
children, and exercise and nutritional regimes that can prevent obesity and morbidity. They are also
making strides in veterinary medicine, and investigating rare diseases like alkaptonuria, which causes
severe early onset osteoarthritis.
And they don’t work alone. They have newly-created facilities in the University of Liverpool’s William
Henry Duncan Building, work closely with other exceptional university teams such as the School of
Veterinary Science and its Leahurst animal hospital, and their global partners include the Wellcome
Trust, UK Research Councils, NIH (USA), Unilever and GSK.
Website: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/ageing-and-chronic-disease/
City: Liverpool
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Musculoskeletal biology
Eye and vision sciences
Obesity and endocrinology
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128
Institute of Ageing Research
About:
The Institute of Aging Research (IAR) is a professional scientic research institution established with
the strong support of Hangzhou Municipal Government. The institute boasts a team of experienced
experts and researchers headed by renowned scholars with international and national fame, and it
is equipped with internationally most advanced facilities for medical research, including platforms of
animal models, cell sorting, microimaging, molecular pathology, proteomics, molecular engineering
and trace metal analysis systems.
The institute aims to conduct omnibearing, systematic and fundamental research on aging mechanism
by combining basic investigation with clinical practice, integrating studies of major aging related
disease conditions and those of key molecules and their interface and networks, and piecing together
the defects at the levels of molecules, cells, tissues, organs and the individuals.
IAR has 4 major research programs, namely Stem cells and tumor cell senescence, Immune
senescence and diseases, Brain and cardiovascular aging and Metabolic and endocrine aging.
In 2011, the institute’s project of “Telomere Binding Proteins and Diseases” has been listed by China’s
National Science Foundation as a “Major National Project of Scientic Research” and has therefore
been granted exceptionally strong support from the Foundation.
Website: http://ageing.hznu.edu.cn/en/
City: Hangzhou
Country: China
Mission/Research Topics:
Tumor cells and stem cell ageing
Immune system ageing and related diseases
Metabolism and endocrine system of ageing and related diseases
Heart ageing
Brain ageing
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129
Institute of Aging (IA)
About:
At the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), they know that research has the power to
change lives. As Canada’s health research investment agency, they collaborate with partners and
researchers to support the discoveries and innovations that improve our health and strengthen our
health care system.
CIHR established the Institute of Aging (IA) «to support research, to promote healthy aging and to
address causes, prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, support systems, and palliation for a
wide range of conditions associated with aging.» Unlike many other CIHR Institutes, which are focused
on particular diseases, the Institute of Aging’s mandate is the aging person in an aging society, and the
effects of different diseases and conditions on aging. Its goal is to improve the quality of life and health
of older Canadians by understanding and addressing or preventing the consequences of a wide range
of factors associated with aging.
Website: http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/8671.html
City: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Healthy and successful ageing
Biological mechanisms of ageing
Cognitive impairment in ageing
Ageing and maintenance of functional autonomy
Health services and policy relating to older people
Their mission is to create new scientic knowledge and to enable its translation into improved health,
more effective health services and products, and a strengthened Canadian health care system.
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130
Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer (IDAC)
About:
IDAC is Japan’s Center for Smart-Aging Research. They are a unique institute that is part of Tohoku
University and they are afliated with other national universities that also promote aging sciences.
It is a well-known fact that Japan’s population is aging faster than any other country in the world, and
the need for aging research is becoming greater each day. Currently, the elderly make up more than
25% of the population, and in addition to the decline in birthrate, there is also a decline in the working
population. In order to maintain a healthy society, it is clear that urgent measures must be taken to
support an aging population.
The purpose of their institute is to shed light on the basic mechanisms of aging and to control age-
related diseases, such as dementia and intractable cancers. To achieve their goals, they promote
research under 3 main groups: (1) molecular mechanisms of aging and the self defense system, (2)
molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and cancer growth, and (3) brain maturation and aging. IDAC
is one of the very few research institutes in the world that manages comprehensive multi-hierarchical
medical research to focus on the complex mechanism of aging, by methods ranging from studying
genes and cells using molecular biology techniques to directly studying people.
Specically, their ultimate goal is to realize “smart-aging”, which refers to the development and
maturation of individual abilities as one gets older, where everyone can welcome old age with liveliness
and continue to be an active part of society.
To make this possible, their goal is to provide medical support and policies as well as becoming a
leading research center by showing the world that they can effectively manage a super-aging society.
As time passes, it is critical for individuals and the population as a whole to remain healthy and
continue to have the vitality for growth and wisdom.
Website: http://www.idac.tohoku.ac.jp/site/
City: Aoba-ku Sendai
Country: Japan
Mission/Research Topics:
Molecular mechanisms of ageing and self defense system
Molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and cancer growth
Brain maturation and ageing
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Institute of Gerontology
About:
The Institute of Gerontology leads cutting edge research and education in the classroom and
community. They advance their healthy aging mission through collaborative strengths in mental health
and cognition, technology innovation, and positive lifestyle promotion.
Institute coordinates and promotes multi- and inter-disciplinary ageing research, training, and outreach
services at the University of Georgia. Keystone research project was The Georgia Centenarian Study
(1998 to 2007) of longevity and survival of the oldest old.
Website: http://iog.publichealth.uga.edu/
City: Athens
Country: USA / GA
Mission/Research Topics:
Functional assessment
Caregiving
Long term care
End of life care
Genetics of ageing
Normal to pathological memory changes
Vision
Nutrition
Exercise science
Pharmacy
Adult education
Social work
Marketing and housing
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Institute of Gerontology (IOG)
About:
Research is focused on research in social and behavioral sciences and cognitive neuroscience to
issues of ageing and urban health.
Established in 1965, the Institute of Gerontology has long been a leader in outreach to both professionals
and members of the community. As a nationally recognized authority on aging issues, their mission
is to conduct research and translate that knowledge into meaningful programming for seniors, their
caregivers and the professional community serving them. Their team of faculty, students, staff, and
countless volunteers all share a passion and dedication to the promotion of successful aging.
Their volunteer core, the Elder Advisors to Research joined with the IOG faculty in 1999 to create
a conference organized by seniors for seniors. What began as an experiment has evolved into a
much-anticipated annual event with a sell-out crowd of 500 seniors. The conference, anchored by
a well-respected keynote speaker and featuring several break-out workshops, promotes creative
expression, social connection and information on ways to positively embrace all facets of aging.
Website: https://iog.wayne.edu/
City: Detroit
Country: USA / MI
Mission/Research Topics:
Financial Gerontology. Research looking into nancial decision-making; assessing community
needs; and the impacts of governmental health programs.
Lifespan cognitive neuroscience. Explores aging and brain health through a variety of
psychological pathways.
Health disparities and disability. Research focused on understanding and eradicating health
disadvantages among minority populations.
Mental health and physical well-being. Research directed at improving the quality of life for
people with physical and cognitive impairments.
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Institute of Healthy Ageing (IHA)
About:
The Institute of Healthy Ageing is an interdisciplinary centre of excellence for research on the biology
of ageing and ageing-related diseases. The biological process of ageing contributes to increased
risk of a wide range of diseases, from neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s
disease) and cancer to cardiovascular disease (causing heart attack and stroke) and age-related
macular degeneration (causing blindness in the elderly).
Their primary purpose is to bring together researchers working on the basic biology of ageing
(biogerontology) with those working to understand the causes of ageing-related disease. By merging
the two, they aim to develop a new translational biogerontology using the ageing process as a point of
intervention to protect against the diseases of old age. Their goal is to improve the health and quality
of life for older people.
The work of the Institute of Healthy Ageing is pursuing these ends by:
Conducting world class research on the biology of ageing and ageing-related disease
Increasing capacity in research on the biology of ageing by training new researchers and
nurturing the work of younger principal investigators
Teaching about the biology of ageing at undergraduate and postgraduate levels
The problem of ageing is not just an issue of biology, but also of social science, economics and the
built environment. A secondary aim of the Institute is to nurture broader collaborations across UCL
between researchers working on different aspects of ageing.
They aim, through their combined activities, to transform healthcare technology and the social
conditions of the elderly to create a future society in which the lives of older people are healthy,
meaningful and happy.
Website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/iha/
City: London
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Genes and mechanisms that determine the rate of ageing
Insulin/IGF-like signalling pathway, dietary restriction and resistance to stress
Sex differences in the biology of ageing
Evolutionary conservation of mechanisms of ageing
Bioethical implications of ageing research
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Institute of Psychogerontology (IPG)
About:
The Institute for Psychogerontology of the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg is
the only university institution of its kind in Bavaria and is one of the few university institutes within
the German-speaking world in the eld of socio-behavioral science and behavioral science, which
also teaches in the context of a master’s program (M. .Sc., Univ) and basic scientic research in
gerontology.
The Institute of Psychogerontology owes its existence to the founding director Prof. Dr. Oswald, who
initiated the institute in 1986 and chaired it for more than 20 years. The importance of the Institute is
also dened by the comprehensive focus on the eld of medical, behavioral and social gerontology at
the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, which is the only university in Germany housing two independent
institutions in Gerontology: the Institute of Biomedicine of Aging (formerly Institute of Gerontology,
Chair: Prof. Dr. med. C. Sieber) and the Institute of Psychogerontology (Chair: Prof. Dr. F.R. Lang).
Since its foundation the Institute for Psychogerontology also experienced a positive development of
its reseach work which received a great amount of attention in the scientic community and as well
as in the media.
One focus during the rst two decades of the Institute were mainly longitudinal studies on topics of
developing dementia in later life.
Website: http://www.geronto.fau.de/
City: Erlangen
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Age and ageing in society and science
Dementia
Intellectual ageing and lifelong learning
Mobility in old age
Caregiving, demands and developmental gains
Social relationships and personality across the lifespan
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Institute on Aging, UC San Diego
About:
The Center for Healthy Aging and the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging at the
University of California, Health Sciences, is dedicated to the development and application of the latest
advances in biomedical and behavioral science knowledge to issues of successful, healthy aging and
the prevention and reduction of the burden of disability and disease in late life.
Website: http://ageing.hznu.edu.cn/en/
City: San Francisco
Country: USA / CA
Mission/Research Topics:
Support research to promote healthy aging and to address causes, prevention, screening,
diagnosis, treatment, support systems, and palliation for a wide range of conditions associated
with aging.
Study the effects of different diseases and conditions on aging person in an aging society.
Improve the quality of life and health of older Canadians by understanding and addressing or
preventing the consequences of a wide range of factors associated with aging.
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Institute on Aging, University of Florida
About:
The overarching goals of the Institute are:
To conduct dynamic interdisciplinary research that spans public health, social, health services,
behavioral, clinical and basic sciences. Our research focuses on mechanisms, etiology, prevention
and rehabilitation of cognitive and physical disability. We strive to accelerate translation,
dissemination and implementation of research ndings into clinical practice and healthcare policy.
To educate undergraduate, graduate, professional and post-graduate trainees in an integrated
model of care and research.
To provide state-of-the-art comprehensive patient and community-centered care for older
adults that is grounded in respect and understanding and fosters compassion and effective
communication with patients, populations and families.
They are committed to the highest level of excellence and integrity in every aspect of our business.
Theypromote and support diversity in opinion, gender, race and ethnicity, promote collaboration
and teamwork. They are focused on and committed to the healthcare needs of their patients. They
show pride, enthusiasm and dedication in research, education and health care, which are aiming to
improve the health, independence and quality of life of older adults. They are concerned about the
environment and promote the use of recyclable products and renewable energy.
Website: http://aging.u.edu/
City: Gainesville
Country: USA / FL
Mission/Research Topics:
The mission of the Institute on Aging is to improve the health, independence and quality of life of
older adults by means of interdisciplinary teams in the areas of research, education and health care.
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Institute on Aging (IOA)
About:
The IOA promotes collaborative applied and basic gerontological research, develops innovative
programs of interdisciplinary gerontological education and practice, and provides state-of-the-art
information to policy makers, program managers, service providers, clinicians, and the general public.
Website:
City: Chapel Hill
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
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Institute on Aging, University of Pennsylvania
About:
The University of Pennsylvania’s Institute on Aging was created in 1979 to improve the health of the
elderly by increasing clinical and basic research as well as educational programs focusing on normal
aging and age-related diseases across the entire Penn campus.
Housed within Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, the Institute on Aging is deeply committed to
forging new paths in basic science and clinical care for the benet of older adults.
Under the directorship of John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, nearly 300 Institute on Aging fellows,
representing faculty from 12 schools at Penn and aging experts outside of Penn, are focused on age-
related areas of interest, including healthy aging, diseases of aging, public policy, law, nursing and
economics.
In 2012, Penn ranked second highest for total research funding received from the National Institute of
Health’s National Institute on Aging (NIA). Current research projects are wide-ranging, investigating
neurodegenerative diseases, frailty, and longevity, among other areas.
The Institute on Aging hosts several events per year on the latest research in aging, many of which
are open to the public.
The IOA works collaboratively together with:
Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR)
Penn Alzheimer’s Disease Center and Penn Memory Center
Penn Udall Center for Parkinson’s Disease Research along with researchers within collaborators
in other divisions and departments:
Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center
Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) Center
Division of Geriatric Medicine
Ralston-Penn Clinic for Osteoporosis and Related Bone Disorders
The Population Aging Research Center (PARC) in Sociology and Demography
In addition, partners include the NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health, an interdisciplinary
group, located in the School of Nursing, that is working to better understand transitions in health
where nurses play a pivotal role in health promotion, prevention of health problems, and the effective
care of people of all ages and at all stages of health.
Website: http://www.med.upenn.edu/aging/
City: Philadelphia
Country: USA / PA
Mission/Research Topics:
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Institute on Aging, University of Virginia
About:
The Institute on Aging (IoA) is a pan-university initiative sponsored by the Ofce of the Vice President
for Research. It promotes basic and applied research on topics related to aging, serves as an
information and education resource about aging issues, and seeks to inuence the development and
implementation of public policy that addresses the needs of older adults. To that end, the Institute
offers seed-money grants to stimulate new research and educational programs, and sponsors lectures
and conferences for scholars, service providers, and the community at large.
The primary mission of the University of Virginia Institute on Aging is to understand and enhance the
aging process throughout the human lifespan. It acts as a catalyst and coordinator for interdisciplinary
research, education, and service programs within the University.
In the area of research, the primary goal is to promote basic and applied research on topics related
to aging.
In the area of education, the primary goals are to serve as an information resource about aging issues,
and to contribute to providing comprehensive education in gerontology and innovative practice in
geriatrics.
In the area of service, the primary goal is to inuence the development and implementation of public
policy on aging, and assist in the development, implementation, and evaluation of programs and
policies addressing the needs of older adults.
Website: http://www.virginia.edu/aginginstitute/
City: Charlottesville
Country: USA / VA
Mission/Research Topics:
Cognitive ageing, memory loss, dementia
Diabetes and ageing
Brain imaging
Life-span development
Cell biological basis of Alzheimer‘s disease
Neurodegenerative diseases
Elderly care and caregivers
Eldercare robotics
Elder abuse
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Institute on Aging, University of Wisconsin - Madison
About:
The University of Wisconsin Institute on Aging was founded in 1973 as the Faye McBeath Institute on
Aging and Adult Life. Between 1973 and 1980, the Institute developed programs in community service
as well as graduate training and research under the leadership of Professor Martin Loeb of the School
of Social Work. Administratively, the Institute was located within the Graduate School of the Madison
campus.
Professor David Featherman of the Department of Sociology was named Director in 1980. Under his
leadership there was steady growth in the research mission of the Institute. Four multidisciplinary
research clusters were conceived: biology of aging, clinical geriatrics, life-span development,
and social gerontology. The rst two represented basic and applied research in the biomedical
sciences, while the latter two reected social behavioral perspectives on basic and applied research.
Dr. Carol Ryff, Professor of Psychology, served as Interim Director of the Institute from 1995 to
1998, and in 1998, was named Director. One Associate Director, representing the biomedical
sciences, was also appointed, a position rst held by Dr. Joanne Robbins and then Dr. Neil Binkley,
both from Department of Medicine. Fluorescing microscope in a Biomolecular Chemistry labUnder
their leadership, the Institute on Aging continues to pursue its research, educational, and outreach
objectives. Particularly prominent on the research side is the MIDUS (Midlife in the U.S.) national
study of Americans, funded by a grant from the National Institute on Aging and directed by Dr. Ryff.
MIDUS constitutes the leading edge of multidisciplinary aging research and involves many scientists
from around the U.S., including many investigators from different departments on the UW-Madison
campus. Its major objective is to understand the interplay of biological, psychological, and social
factors as people age from early adulthood through later life. Also prominent is the Biology of Aging
Training Grant (funded by the National Institute on Aging), rst headed by Dr. Richard Weindruch and
subsequently by Dr. Sanjay Asthana (Head of the Geriatrics Section in the Department of Medicine
and Director of the Geriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center). This initiative has been a key
mechanism for bringing talented new investigators to the eld of aging.
Website: http://aging.wisc.edu/
City: Madison
Country: USA / WI
Mission/Research Topics:
Biology of aging
Clinical geriatrics
Life-span development
Social gerontology
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141
Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on
Aging (HNRCA)
About:
The Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University,
located in Boston, MA, is one of six human nutrition research centers supported by the United States
Department of Agriculture (USDA). They are a bench to bedside research center that generates
translational scientic results. They are run by a cooperative agreement between the USDA and Tufts
University and their center is one of the largest research centers in the world studying nutrition and its
relationship to healthy aging and physical activity.
The HNRCA is the Tufts University resource for training graduate students and postdoctoral fellows
in human nutrition and aging research. Many HNRCA scientists are faculty at the Friedman School
of Nutrition Science and Policy, School of Medicine, and/or Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical
Sciences at Tufts University and/or have appointments at Tufts Medical Center. HNRCA scientists
have ongoing collaborations across the four Tufts University campuses and serve on university
leadership positions.
Website: http://hnrca.tufts.edu/
City: Boston
Country: USA / MA
Mission/Research Topics:
Antioxidants
Body composition
Bone metabolism
Carotenoids and health
Cardiovascular nutrition
Dietary assessment
Energy metabolism
Epidemiology
Lipid metabolism
Nutrition
Neuroscience
Obesity metabolism
Vitamin metabolism
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142
Jena Centre for Systems Biology of Ageing (JenAge)
About:
The JenAge Centre is a multidisciplinary research centre located in Jena / Germany. It was launched
in October 2009 as a result of the successful grant application of 10 Jena-based research groups to
the German Federal Ministry’s of Education and Research call ‘Systems Biology for Health in Old
Age - Gerontosys’.
The JenAge Centre aims to identify conserved transcriptional and metabolic networks activated by
mild stress and to investigate their role in preserving functional integrity in old age. The generally
favorable biological response of an organism to low dose exposure of stressors, called hormesis, has
been repeatedly suggested to be the biological mechanism of life-extending treatments.
In addition to the use of human cell cultures JenAge adopts a multi-species approach including worms
( C. elegans), shes (N. furzeri, D. rerio) and mice ( M. musculus) to characterise network modulations
by environmental, pharmacological and life-style perturbations. In an iterative process, experimental
data are communicated to the analysis and modelling groups to generate testable hypotheses which
will in turn be validated by genetic and other manipulations in model organisms. This systems biology
strategy is supplemented by automatic text mining and database development.
The general JenAge objective is to gain new insights into the complex interplay of maintenance
and repair networks that govern the lifelong accumulation of damage and nally lead to age-related
diseases and death. Overall, the knowledge acquired within this initiative will contribute to sustained
health in an ageing society.
Website: http://www.jenage.de/
City: Jena
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Identify conserved transcriptional and metabolic networks activated by mild stress and to
investigate their role in preserving functional integrity in old age.
Adopt a multi-species approach including worms (C. elegans), shes (N. furzeri, D. rerio) and
mice (M. musculus) to characterise network modulations by environmental, pharmacological
and life-style perturbations.
Gain new insights into the complex interplay of maintenance and repair networks that govern
the lifelong accumulation of damage and nally lead to age-related diseases and death.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
143
Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health
About:
The Center on Aging and Health (COAH) was established in 1998 as a center of excellence for aging
research at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. It is sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Schools of
Medicine and Public Health. Other core partners include the School of Nursing and the departments
of Medicine, Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Health Policy and Management, and Mental Health.
COAH is home to an interdisciplinary group of research faculty from all three schools, as well as the
Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (Pepper Center) , Edward R. Roybal Center
for Translational Research, and other key research programs. COAH also houses training programs in
the Epidemiology and Biostatistics of Aging, and in Clinical and Population-based Research on Aging,
as well as the Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Certicate in Gerontology program.COAH is a
focal point for interdisciplinary aging research and training at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
COAH aims to establish a critical mass of cutting-edge, multidisciplinary science designed to optimize
health in aging and to provide the necessary expertise and infrastructure for the sustainable conduct
of such research and its translation into improving the health of older adults. COAH also serves as a
training ground for the next generation of researchers on aging.
The goal of COAH is to promote the intellectual interactions that are essential to creative approaches
to solving the important health and health care problems for an aging population. The core research in
COAH involves population-based and clinical research on the causes and consequences of diseases,
frailty and disability in older adults, characterizing groups at risk of adverse health outcomes, identifying
causes and developing methods for screening and prevention. Research at COAH covers the full
spectrum of aging research, from the biology of aging to health policy, facilitating the translation
of research discoveries into applications that will directly improve the health of older adults. COAH
provides key infrastructure, such as the Biostatistics Core, that supports clinical- and population-
based research and education, with expertise in research with older adults.
COAH’s core research facility is located on the Johns Hopkins East Baltimore campus at 2024 East
Monument Street, Suite 2-700, focusing on older adults’ health from a population-based perspective.
The clinical care and geriatric health services research-focused site is located on the Johns Hopkins
Bayview Medical Campus on the 7th oor of the Mason F. Lord building.
Website: http://coah.jhu.edu/
City: Baltimore
Country: USA / MD
Mission/Research Topics:
Training programs in the Epidemiology and Biostatistics of Aging, and in Clinical and Population-
based Research on Aging
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Interdisciplinary aging research and training at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
Establish a critical mass of cutting-edge, multidisciplinary science designed to optimize health in
aging
Provide the necessary expertise and infrastructure for the sustainable conduct of such research
and its translation into improving the health of older adults.
Promote the intellectual interactions that are essential to creative approaches to solving the
important health and health care problems for an aging population.
Population-based and clinical research on the causes and consequences of diseases, frailty
and disability in older adults, characterizing groups at risk of adverse health outcomes, identify-
ing causes and developing methods for screening and prevention.
From the biology of aging to health policy, facilitate the translation of research discoveries into
applications that will directly improve the health of older adults.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
145
KEEPS - The KRONOS Early Estrogen Prevention Study at
KRONOS Longevity Research Institute (KLRI)
About:
The Kronos Longevity Research Institute (KLRI), founded in Jan., 2000, is a Phoenix-based not-for-
prot institution conducting clinical translational research aimed at early detection and prevention of
age-related diseases and slowing or reversing the aging process.
KLRI also provides education in biomedical gerontology for regional and national professional and
lay communities. KLRI is privately funded, mainly by the Aurora Foundation. S. Mitchell Harman,
M.D., Ph.D., founding Director and President is board-certied in internal medicine and endocrinology
and a former section chief and acting clinical director of the National Institute on Aging, NIH, with an
international reputation as a leader in the eld of hormones and aging. Other professional staff are:
a Clinical Director, Director of Exercise Sciences, Senior Scientist, and Clinical Study Coordinator.
KLRI’s facility includes a clinical study center (CSC), an exercise study center (ESC), and a molecular
laboratory.
Current research focuses on relationships among aging, endocrine function, oxidative stress, and
sarcopenia. All research projects are pre-reviewed by KLRI’s Scientic Advisory Board, a distinguished
group of biomedical investigators. KLRI sponsors a series of bimonthly seminars in Phoenix and
an annual two-day national symposium, with talks on biomedical gerontology presented by world-
renowned experts. The institute has plans to double faculty, staff, and research activities by 2006,
which will require new sources of funding. The aging demography of the rst half of the century will
make KLRI’s research increasingly relevant to the population of the U.S. and the world.
Website:
City: Phoenix
Country: USA / AZ
Mission/Research Topics:
Conduct clinical translational research aimed at early detection and prevention of age-related
diseases and slowing or reversing the aging process.
Provide education in biomedical gerontology for regional and national professional and lay
communities.
Research relationships among aging, endocrine function, oxidative stress, and sarcopenia
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
146
Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI)
About:
The Leibniz Institute on Aging Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) is the rst national research institute in
Germany focusing on biomedical research on human aging, a multifactorial process controlled by
environmental and genetic factors.
The legal status of the FLI is that of a registered association (e.V.), registered in 1992 as Institute for
Molecular Biology (IMB). In accordance to the new research orientation, the institute was renamed to
Leibniz Institute for Age Research – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) in 2005.
The FLI is a member of the Leibniz Association (Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
e.V.). Due to the importance of Leibniz Institutes for the country as a whole, they are funded jointly by
the Federation and the Länder.
Demographic Change is one of the great challenges of our time but also offers great opportunities. If a
better understanding of the aging process contributes to the extension of healthy lifespan, the burdens
on society and the individual can be minimized and our society’s future development enriched by the
wealth of knowledge and experience that is the gift of the older generation.
The mission of the Leibniz Institute on Aging (FLI) is to identify the basic mechanisms that lead to
dysfunctions and disease during aging.
The society’s increasingly older population is one of the major social challenges of the present. Their
mission is to expand the healthy lifespan – i.e. to increase the time we can age healthier and enjoy an
active lifestyle. As a member of the Leibniz Association, they are committed to inform the public about
new insights in aging - because we all are aging.
Their Research aims to provide a knowledge basis for the development of future therapies which
extend the health span during aging.
Website: http://www.leibniz-i.de/
City: Jena
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Secure better understanding of the aging process contributes to the extension of healthy
lifespan
Identify the basic mechanisms that lead to dysfunctions and disease during aging.
Provide a knowledge basis for the development of future therapies which extend the health span
during aging.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
147
Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine
(IUF)
About:
The IUF was founded in 2001. Its legal form is that of a non-prot, limited liability company. Sole
shareholder is the “Gesellschaft zur Förderung umweltmedizinischer Forschung e.V.” (GFUF,
Society for the Promotion of Environmental-Medical Research) a non-prot association of seven
highly prestigious medical associations. In January 2011, the IUF became a member of the Leibniz
Association and was renamed IUF – Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine.
The IUF’s major task is to carry out molecular preventive medical research of environmentally-induced
disorders. The main objective is to improve health care with regard to environmental pollution and
to develop preventive strategies. The IUF carries out research projects addressing the biological
effects that pollutants (in particular particles, non-ionizing radiation and chemicals) have on humans.
Environmentally-induced aging processes of the cardiovascular system and the skin as well as
environmentally-induced disturbances of the immune system and damages to the brain are in focus.
Based on the scientic competence in the institute these investigations are carried out interdisciplinarily.
The IUF bundles scientic expertise in the elds of toxicology, immunology, molecular aging research
and epidemiology. This interdisciplinary research approach needs experimental models of one or
more barrier organs (boundary surface medicine). The impact of environmental factors is mainly
investigated in the organ systems skin, lung, cardiovascular system, and brain. Besides in vitro
examinations on cultured cells and (partly genuinely at the IUF developed) human 3 dimensional
organic model systems, in vivo examinations are conducted in animal models as well as in humans
using a specially established research unit for this purpose. Additionally, epidemiological studies are
conducted.
The IUF has about 130 employees at the moment. Approximately half of them are being nanced
through external project-bound grants provided by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche
Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG), the European Union, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research
(Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, BMBF) and other research-funding institutions.
Website: http://www.iuf-duesseldorf.de/home.html
City: Düsseldorf
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Environmental-induced ageing processes
Environmental-induced impairment of the immune system (immunotoxicology)
Molecular mechanisms of premature ageing
Degenerative diseases
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
148
Lifespan Health Research Center (LHRC)
About:
IDAC is Japan’s Center for Smart-Aging ‘Research. They are a unique institute that is part of Tohoku
University and they are afliated with other national universities that also promote aging sciences.
It is a well-known fact that Japan’s population is aging faster than any other country in the world, and
the need for aging research is becoming greater each day. Currently, the elderly make up more than
25% of the population, and in addition to the decline in birthrate, there is also a decline in the working
population. In order to maintain a healthy society, it is clear that urgent measures must be taken to
support an aging population.
The purpose of their institute is to shed light on the basic mechanisms of aging and to control age-
related diseases, such as dementia and intractable cancers. To achieve their goals, they promote
research under 3 main groups: (1) molecular mechanisms of aging and the self defense system, (2)
molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and cancer growth, and (3) brain maturation and aging. IDAC
is one of the very few research institutes in the world that manages comprehensive multi-hierarchical
medical research to focus on the complex mechanism of aging, by methods ranging from studying
genes and cells using molecular biology techniques to directly studying people.
Specically, their ultimate goal is to realize “smart-aging”, which refers to the development and
maturation of individual abilities as one gets older, where everyone can welcome old age with
liveliness and continue to be an active part of society. To make this possible, their goal is to provide
medical support and policies as well as becoming a leading research center by showing the world
that they can effectively manage a super-aging society. As time passes, it is critical for individuals and
the population as a whole to remain healthy and continue to have the vitality for growth and wisdom.
We call this approach “SMART-AGING”.
Website: http://www.idac.tohoku.ac.jp/site/
City: Dayton
Country: USA / OH
Mission/Research Topics:
Growth, maturation and aging
Body composition
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease
Genetic epidemiology of complex traits
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149
Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing
(MICRA)
About:
MICRA supports a community of over 100 active academics, bringing together international experts and
leading researchers working across the eld of ageing. Over 60 research projects and programmes
span the Faculties of Humanities; Biology, Medicine and Health; and Science and Engineering. Ageing
research is a strategic priority for The University of Manchester, as part of its commitment to social,
economic and cultural impact. Founded in 2010, MICRA is recognised as a leading international
centre for research on ageing.
Its researchers address fundamental research questions about ageing and society through
collaborative research, with funders for ageing research including the European Union, UK Research
Councils, Government, the Big Lottery, industry, NGOs and the charity sector.
Inuencing policy, practice and debate
MICRA is situated in the heart of Manchester, the UK’s rst city to achieve World Health Organization
age-friendly status. We engage critically with stakeholders and policy makers at global, national,
regional, local and community levels to deliver research with demonstrable policy impact.
It aim to embed contributions from older people and stakeholders into all stages of research, ensuring
that our work has meaning and direct societal relevance. MICRA is part of the Greater Manchester
Ageing Hub, tasked with bringing together plans to support local older people. A range of key policy
actors from across Manchester and the UK participate as hub partners.
Website: http://www.micra.manchester.ac.uk/connect/events//
City: Manchester
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Biology of ageing and lifespan
Engineering, environment and technology
Frailty, cognition and dementia
Inequalities, health and well-being
Later life work, retirement and pensions
Physical decline and tissue regeneration
Public policy and care provision
Social and cultural change and later life
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Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing
About:
Research at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing is dedicated to deciphering the mystery of
growing old: Why do organisms age at all? How can we inuence our ageing and lifespan? And how
can we ensure that with increasing age, our bodies remain vital and healthy?
As one of more than 80 independent non-prot research institutions under the umbrella of the Max
Planck Society, the overall goal of our institute is thus to understand the natural ageing process and
to discover how to intervene in it to ameliorate age-related diseases.
Max Planck Institute strive to uncover the underlying molecular, physiological and evolutionary
mechanisms by using laboratory model organisms such as sh, mice, ies and worms. (For more
information on our animal studies, please look here.) Since its long-term goal is to pave the way towards
increasing health during ageing in humans, a key line of research is to investigate interventions that
can ameliorate the ageing process.
In this respect, a ground-breaking discovery of recent years is that mutations in single genes in the
simple, single-celled yeast, in multi-cellular animals such as worms and ies as well as in mice, can
extend lifespan and produce a broad-spectrum improvement in health during ageing. The mechanisms
involved seem to be similar in these very different organisms, and the same kinds of genes are turning
out to be associated with survival to later ages in humans.
Hence, there is an unprecedented opportunity to use simpler organisms to make discoveries of
relevance to the amelioration of human ageing. At the forefront of basic biomedical science and in
close cooperation with its scientic partner organisations, they contribute to meeting the challenges of
global changes associated with the health challenges of increasing human lifespan.
In particular, its research focuses on the roles of signaling through insulin/insulin-like growth factor
and steroidal hormones, cellular components involved in growth control and nutrient sensing, factors
regulating metabolism and function of mitochondria and mechanisms of neurodegeneration and other
ageing-related diseases.
Website: https://www.age.mpg.de/
City: Cologne
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Mitochondrial biology
Biological mechanisms of ageing
Molecular genetics of ageing
Skin homeostasis and ageing
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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
About:
The Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR) in Rostock is one of the leading
demographic research centers in the world. At the MPIDR, researchers from all over the world
investigate demographic change, aging, fertility, biological demography and other issues at the
forefront of population research. The Institute is headed by its directors Mikko Myrskylä and James
W. Vaupel.
The Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR) in Rostock (directions and map)
investigates the structure and dynamics of populations. The Institute’s researchers explore issues
of political relevance, such as demographic change, aging, fertility, and the redistribution of work
over the life course, as well as aspects of evolutionary biology and medicine. The MPIDR is one
of the largest demographic research bodies in Europe, and is a worldwide leader in the study of
populations. The Institute is part of the Max Planck Society, the internationally renowned German
research organization.
Research projects form the core of the scientic work at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic
Research (MPIDR), bringing together researchers to work on individual research questions, and
producing project-specic publications. Currently there are over 150 projects covering various research
topics, ranging from formal demography to the social and political implications of demographic change.
Website: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/en/default.htm
City: Rostock
Country: Germany
Mission/Research Topics:
Evolutionary biodemography - genetic, medical, and biological aspects of ageing
Economic and social demography - transformation of the human life-cycle
Population and policy - coherence between policy and demographic change
Historical demography - European focus on the persistence of family patterns over the centuries
and mortality decline around 1800
Survival and longevity - ageing of human populations
Lifecourse dynamics and demographic change - impact of micro and macro conditions at critical
stages of life on individual and population-level outcomes later in life, focusing on health, mortality,
and fertility
Generations- and Gender Programme - demographic consequences of institutional, political, and
economic change in Europe
Evolution of ageing
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152
McGill Centre for Studies in Aging (MCSA)
About:
The McGill University Research Centre for Studies in Aging (MCSA) has developed a strong expertise
in the eld of brain aging. It is recognized as one of the world’s leading research centres in the elds
of memory, cognition and forms of dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related
disorders.
In addition to the individual research activities of the scientists of the centre, they launched a common
research activity of the Centre in 2010: The Program for the Prevention Of Neurodegenerative
Disease in Everybody at Risk (PONDER; http://ponder.mcgill.ca/). This cognitive testing and training
initiative recruits adult subjects (40 to 90 years of age) from the local community and assesses their
cognitive abilities over time in areas that have been identied as showing the earliest changes in
neurodegenerative disease (e.g., digit-span, trail-making, word-list). At the same time, it allows
participants to engage in cognitive training in areas that have been shown to be sensitive for
enhancement through training, i.e. memory, processing speed, and attention. The Program was
launched in April, 2010, for a beta-testing phase, and has without active recruitment and advertisement
already attracted more than 100 participants
Website: http://aging.mcgill.ca/rt.htm
City: Verdun
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
The clinical research programme of the MCSA was established to examine and determine the
clinical characteristics of normal and abnormal aging in human subjects.
The HEALTHY AGING research programme that focuses on the characterization of
psychological and biological markers associated with normal healthy aging.
The UNHEALTHY AGING research program that focuses on diseases of the elderly that affects
primarily the brain and the nervous system.
The HEALTHY AGING research programme based at the Douglas Hospital was put in place
several years ago under the leadership of Dr. N.P.V. Nair who, in collaboration with the World
Health Organization, established a monitoring research programme that invited healthy elderly
volunteers to visit the clinic twice yearly for a complete physical, neuropsychological and
biochemical check-up. More than 400 volunteers were enrolled in this long term study of healthy
aging and several discoveries were made on the physiological consequences of age-related
deterioration of the endocrine system. In addition to Dr. N.P.V. Nair, Drs. S. Lupien, M. Meaney,
D. Dastoor and M. D. Schwartz have all played crucial roles in the development of this research
programme.
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153
Medawar Centre for Healthy Ageing Research
About:
The University has a longstanding interest in ageing that began when Peter Medawar was the Mason
Professor of Zoology in the late 1940s. Medawar is probably best known for his work on immune
tolerance, for which he received a Nobel prize, but he also developed one of the key theories relating
to the evolution of ageing – the Mutation Accumulation Theory of Ageing.
In the last decade ageing has become a growing research interest at the University. To reect the
importance of ageing research at Birmingham, the University has set up the Centre for Healthy Ageing
Research and is making signicant new appointments in 2011 at senior level in Stem Cells and Ageing
research to support the work of the centre.
We are an ageing population, with current demographic trends indicating that 1 in 5 adults in the UK
will be aged over 65 by the year 2020.
Whilst this is a cause for celebration, there is also evidence that healthspan (the time spent in good
health) is not keeping pace with the increases in average lifespan, with signicant consequences for
quality of life in old age and for health and social services provision. Thus medical advances have
ensured that a greater proportion of the population make it through to the third age of man, but they
have made less impact upon the quality of life in old age.
Age is the most important risk factor for many disabling human diseases and on average men will still
be unwell for the last 6 years of their lives and women for the last 11 years.
Website: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/mds/centres/healthy-ageing/index.aspx
City: Birmingham
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Aging and the cardiovascular system
Aging and the immune system
Aging in nematodes
Ensuring good health in old age
Aging brain
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154
Michigan Alzheimer‘s Disease Center (MADC)
About:
Established at the University of Michigan Health System and based in the Department of Neurology,
the Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Center aims to.
Conduct and support research on Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders;
Promote state-of-the-art care and wellness for individuals and families affected by memory loss;
Increase dementia awareness through collaborative education and outreach efforts.
The center’s goals include:
Support recruitment for memory and aging research.
Connect interested volunteers to research opportunities.
Provide programs focusing on whole-body health and well-being through our Wellness Initiative.
Collaborate with three local chapters of the Alzheimer’s Association to enhance our community
outreach through education programs.
Website: http://alzheimers.med.umich.edu/
City: Ann Arbor
Country: USA / MI
Mission/Research Topics:
Biomarkers used for early detection
Disease modifying treatments
Basic disease mechanisms
Effective strategies to help individuals with memory loss
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
155
Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging (MiCDA)
About:
The Michigan P30 Center on the Demography of Aging is a joint program of the Population Studies
Center and Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. Funding
is provided by the Behavioral and Social Research (BSR) Program of the U.S. National Institute on
Aging (P30 AG012846). The goal is to spur new research on the economics and demography of aging
and encourage use of major datasets in the eld.
The Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging promotes new research on the demography
and economics of aging across four signature themes: chronic disease and disability; life course
determinants of late-life health and well-being; aging, genetics, and social science; and economics
of savings and retirement. The Center also promotes the wide use of Michigan’s key aging-related
data collections, notably the Health and Retirement Study and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.
In addition, the Center fosters national and international collaboration through coordination of several
research networks, funds pilot projects, distributes research ndings by afliates, and supports a
secure statistical enclave for access to restricted aging-related data. The Center provides coordinating
support to all NIA Centers and collaborates with the Population Reference Bureau to widely disseminate
all Centers’ research ndings.
The National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health supports research centers on
the demography and economics of aging based at the University of California at Berkeley; Duke
University; Harvard University; the University of Michigan; the National Bureau of Economic Research;
the University of Pennsylvania; the RAND Corporation; Stanford University; the University of Southern
California and the University of California at Los Angeles; the University of Washington; and the
University of Wisconsin.
Website: https://micda.psc.isr.umich.edu/
City: Ann Arbor
Country: USA / MI
Mission/Research Topics:
Surveys/Data collection
Economics of saving and retirement in the U.S.
Disparities by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status
Chronic diseases
Cognition, mental health
Historical demography
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
156
National Ageing Research Institute (NARI)
About:
The National Ageing Research Institute (NARI) has for the past four decades been bringing research
to life to improve health outcomes and aged care practice as well as to guide policy to invest in
solutions for positive ageing for Australia’s older people.
NARI is a national leader in ageing research, producing work of international signicance to apply
to real lives, particularly in falls and balance, pain, dementia, physical activity, healthy ageing,
psychosocial and mental health, and health systems evaluation.
NARI is recognised as a leading research institute in ageing including falls and balance, pain, dementia,
physical activity, healthy ageing, public and preventive health, and health systems evaluation. NARI
also conducts a broad range of other clinical and psychosocial research including research into
cognitive decline and music therapy, and older women’s health.
The Institute concentrates its research in several key divisions. These divisions cover ageing research
from a variety of perspectives including both a public and preventive health, perspective, service
development, biomedical and from a and clinical perspective. NARI currently employs over fty staff
and at any one time manages over fty research projects.
These range from large, competitive NHMRC projects to commissioned and self-initiated research.
NARI’s funding is mainly derived from competitive government and other grants and it also receives a
small amount of infrastructure funding from the state Department of Health (Victoria).
Website: http://www.nari.net.au
City: Parkville
Country: Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
Vascular system
Stroke
Dementia
Clinical research
Pain - dementia and memory loss, age differences, management and assessment, pain
experience
Drug trials
Falls prevention
Service evaluation - community care, health care and rehabilitation, residential care
Health promotion
Population studies
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
157
National Institute for Mental Health Research
About:
Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute (APHCRI) was established at The Australian
National University in 2003 as part of the Primary Health Care Research Evaluation and Development
(PHCRED) Strategy of the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. APHCRI sat
within the PHCRED strategy sharing the common overall aim of embedding a research culture in
Australian primary health care.
The Australian National University’s contract with the Department of Health for APHCRI ceased on 31
December 2015. Ongoing externally conducted research is being managed by the Research School
of Population Health to ensure contract compliance and associated payments. Most projects will end
in 2016; but some Centres of Research Excellence will continue into 2017 and 2019.
The vision of the Centre for Mental Health Research (CMHR) is to be recognised as a leader in
excellent, innovative, population-based mental health research that is relevant to policy and practice.
Their goals include:
Excellence in research
Dissemination of high-quality research through translation into policy and practice
Training future leaders through research supervision and teaching
A focus on research that is designed to be highly relevant to the mental health sector and to the
broader population.
Incorporating the crucial lived experience perspective that consumers and carers bring,
contributing to research directions, informing research design and in conducting research.
Collaboration with the mental health sector to reach common goals, including collaboration with
academics from across disciplines, policymakers, service providers, consumers and carers.
Building capacity and sustainability in population mental health research.
Website: http://rsph.anu.edu.au/research/centres-departments/australian-primary-health-care-
research-institute
City: Canberra
Country: Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
Depression
Anxiety disorders
Substance abuse
Bipolar disorders
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
158
National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life
(NISAL)
About:
The university carries out world-leading, cross-border research in close collaboration with business
and society, including materials, IT and hearing. In the same spirit, Linköping University, LiU, offers a
large number of innovative programs, not least many professions for, for example, doctors, teachers,
civil economists and civil engineers.
The university has 27,000 students and 4,000 employees at four campuses who together seek
answers to complex issues of the day. The students are among the most sought after in the labor
market and according to international rankings, LiU is among the foremost in the world.
Linköping University has always worked with innovation in education and research. In 1980 the newly
formed Department of Thematic Studies adopted an approach that was new in Sweden. Research
was organised in interdisciplinary themes, such as Technology and Social Change or Water and
Environmental Studies. Scientists worked across boundaries to solve complex problems. LiU was
also rst in Sweden to introduce graduate research schools for the different themes. The model later
spread to other parts of the university and became a national success.
The new Faculty of Health Sciences (Hälsouniversitetet), formed in 1986, combined governmentally
and regionally funded education. It introduced a radically changed methodology, being the rst in
Sweden to use problem-based learning, PBL. Furthermore, LiU became the rst university in the
world to allow students at educational departments to treat actual patients.
Website: https://old.liu.se/personal/isv/nisal?l=en
City: Linköping
Country: Sweden
Mission/Research Topics:
Socio-cultural, political and historical context
Care and welfare
Ageing in time and space: home, housing, and technological landscape
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
159
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
About:
NIA, one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of NIH, leads the federal government in conducting and
supporting research on aging and the health and well-being of older people. The Institute seeks to
understand the nature of aging and the aging process, and diseases and conditions associated with
growing older, in order to extend the healthy, active years of life.
In 1974, Congress granted authority to form NIA to provide leadership in aging research, training,
health information dissemination, and other programs relevant to aging and older people. Subsequent
amendments to this legislation designated NIA as the primary Federal agency on Alzheimer’s disease
research.
The Institute’s mission is to:
Support and conduct genetic, biological, clinical, behavioral, social, and economic research on
aging.
Foster the development of research and clinician scientists in aging.
Provide research resources.
Disseminate information about aging and advances in research to the public, health care -
professionals, and the scientic community, among a variety of audiences.
NIA pursues this mission by funding extramural research at universities and medical centers
across the United States and around the world; maintaining an active communications and
outreach program; and conducting a vibrant intramural research program at NIA laboratories in
Baltimore and Bethesda, Maryland.
Aging Well in the 21st Century: Strategic Directions for Research on Aging, most recently updated in
2016, is NIA’s «road map» for progress in aging research and outlines our goals and vision. It provides
a point of reference for setting priorities and a framework for systematically analyzing the Institute’s
scientic portfolio and assessing progress.
Website: https://www.nia.nih.gov
City: Bethesda
Country: USA / MD
Mission/Research Topics:
Mechanisms of ageing
Processes of ageing
Ageing in relation to health and disease
Age-related changes in physiology and the ability to adapt to environmental stress
Pathophysiology of age-related diseases
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
160
New Zealand Institute for Research on Ageing (NZIRA)
About:
The IGPS is a public policy think tank, working to lift environmental, social and economic outcomes
for New Zealand via research and engagement.
The aim of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies is to deliver independent, high quality and
high-impact research that informs the policy-making process and inuences policy development and
implementation across a number of signicant areas. While such research will focus in particular on
issues of direct relevance to New Zealand and its citizens, it will also (where appropriate) have an
international and comparative dimension. Whatever the precise nature of the research, it will relate to
one or more of the Research Objectives of the Institute and act as the critic and conscience of society.
Website: http://igps.victoria.ac.nz/Ageing/Index.html
City: Wellington
Country: New Zealand
Mission/Research Topics:
To enhance the quality of public body decision-making.
To contribute to the improvement of public management and governance in New Zealand and
Internationally.
To carry out independent public policy research in order to achieve better social, environmental
and economic outcomes for the benet of all New Zealanders.
To seek through the Institute’s various programmes and activities to help solve (or at least
ameliorate) some of the big policy problems facing contemporary governments).
To deliver independent, high quality and high-impact research that informs and inuences the
policy-making process.
To inuence policy development, management and implementation in order to achieve better
outcomes for New Zealanders and New Zealand.
To widely disseminate the ndings from research projects to better inform elected
representatives, ofcials, policy-makers and the general public.
To engage with the community through regular news releases and media commentary,
workshops and public seminars.
To have Institute staff and associates contribute to public debate in areas where they have
relevant expertise, including preparing submissions on government bills and discussion papers.
To raise the prole and public standing of the University and of the School of Government.
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Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
About:
The Oxford Institute of Population Ageing was established in 1998. Based on the US Population
Center, it was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Health (National Institute on Aging - NIA)
to establish the UK’s rst population centre on the demography and economics of ageing populations.
It achieved Institute status in 2001.
Their aim is to undertake research into the implications of population change. They are a multi-
disciplinary group with demography as our main disciplinary focus, and links into all four University
Divisions. Their researchers work in Africa, Latin America, Asia and Europe, and they run the Population
Networks AFRAN (Africa) LARNA (Latin America) EAST (Central and Eastern Europe).
«Changes in the demographic age structure of populations has become one of the major challenges
for the 21st century. Driven predominantly by falling fertility rates across the globe as the Total Fertility
Rates of two thirds of the globes countries now reach around or below replacement level, this age
compositional shift has huge implications for all aspects of society and economy. Falling mortality
rates, especially among the older population has enhanced this age shift, especially in advanced
economies.
Key questions addressed by the Institute concern the ageing of populations, the potential of the
growing labour pool in Emerging Economies, and the progress of the fertility transition in Least
Developed Economies. This demographic change affects all regions of the world, from demographic
decits in Europe, demographic dividends in Asia and youth bulges on the Middle East.» - Professor
Sarah Harper, Director, Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
Website: http://www.ageing.ox.ac.uk
City: Oxford
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Understanding demographic change
Demography and economy
Demography and society
Bio-Demography and health
Demography, science and innovation
Demography and environment
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
162
Perceptual & Cognitive Aging Lab
About:
Many older adults are excellent drivers, yet they are more likely to be involved in a collision and to be
injured or killed as a result. The increased risk of collisions is a result of many factors, including physical
and cognitive declines that can accompany the aging process. Families, doctors, governments and
the general public have become quite interested in assessing driving skills in older adults and in
providing training to correct poor driving habits. If you want to improve your golf game, you go to the
expert. Why not take the same approach to driving?
The Perceptual and Cognitive Aging lab will soon offer driving assessments to let you know if there
are any issues that could potentially impact your ability to drive safely. They don’t take away licenses;
they educate. Who gets your test results is completely up to you.
Don’t just think you’re safe. Know you are.
The Perceptual and Cognitive Aging Lab has the tools that can alert you of potential issues that could
impact your ability to drive safely. One completely free visit can give you or your loved ones peace of
mind and can point you towards resources that can help you become a safer driver.
Website: http://psych.ucalgary.ca/PACE/PCA-Lab/
City: Calgary
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Early detection of declines in driving ability
Driving safety
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
163
Research Centre on Aging
About:
The Research Centre on Aging (CDRV) is home to approximately fty researchers who work in a
variety of scientic disciplines. The Centre also has around twenty associate researchers and over
one hundred people who are committed to research in one form or another. The CDRV is one of the
most important centres on aging in Canada.
Work conducted at the CDRV can help us all - young and seniors alike – lead more active life and to
adopt healthier lifestyles with a view to successful aging. The CDRV supports social initiatives at large
to offer the best response to the needs of seniors and to offer them better services.
Their ultimate goal is to improve the quality of life of seniors and to help us make the right decisions
throughout our lives so that we can age well in a healthy, autonomous manner.
Since its foundation in 1988, the Research Centre on Aging has been pursuing its mission rst under
the Health and Social Services Centre – University Institute of Geriatrics of Sherbrooke (CSSS-IUGS),
then under the CIUSSS de l’Estrie - CHUS.
The proximity of the CIUSSS de l’Estrie - CHUS allows students to come into contact with both
the research and clinical spheres of their professions such as short and long-term care, geriatric
rehabilitation, the Day Hospital, gerontopsychology, outpatient clinics (memory, incontinence), and
so on.
Website: http://cdrv.csss-iugs.ca/home
City: Sherbrouke / Quebec
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Nutrition and senior autonomy;
Cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases (i.e. Alzheimer’s), cancer, endocrine
dysfunctions (i.e. diabetes);
Processes and effects of sarcopenia (loss of muscle mass)
Home support in the context of an aging population;
Fall prevention;
Social and psychological vulnerability among seniors;
Telehealh, telerehabilitation and telemonitoring;
Driving and road safety;
Study of the biological mechanisms of aging and associated pathologies;
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
164
Salford Institute for Dementia
About:
They approach is putting the humanity and personhood of the person with dementia at the heart
of what they do. The institute is engaged in research, innovation and education in supportive
design and care for people living with dementia. The focus of this work is the maintenance of
independence and the promotion of integrated support in the communities where people live.
At the University of Salford they have made the decision to utilise our resources to benet those in our
society whose lives have been changed by dementia today. In November 2013, they established the Salford
Institute for Dementia, building on over three years of successful collaboration across a unique network
of academics at the University. The Institute has at its’ heart a spotlight on the humanity and personhood
of those living with dementia. Its driving philosophy is to enable people to live positive, fullled lives and
instil in everyone a condence that they can make a difference to an individual’s experience of dementia.
At Salford they are offering a multi-disciplinary lens on this urgent global challenge. As part of their
work to become a “dementia friendly” university, over 50 colleagues from across the institution
including the School of the Built Environment, the College of Health and Social Sciences andthe
School of Arts and Media, have created new collaborations to focus our work in this area. This has
been supported by their key partners at a local, national and international level, including Alzheimer’s
UK, Four Seasons Healthcare and the Dementia Action Alliance through the establishment of their own
local organisation, the Salford Dementia Action Alliance. Through these relationships and our wider
discussions they have discovered that demand for knowledge, networks, expertise and investment in
this area is urgently needed and signicant.
Website:http://www.salford.ac.uk/salford-institute-for-dementia
City: Salford
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Personhood and humanity
Purposeful activity for people with dementia
Design of private and public spaces
Experience of black and ethnic minorities
Experience of people living with dementia in hard to reach communities and individuals
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
165
Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA)
About:
Established in 1979, the SBCoA conducts research, education and outreach, and clinical programs on
healthy brain aging and neurodegenerative disorders.
Highly productive and collaborative basic and clinical scientists work together, producing synergistic
and high impact research that is changing the eld of aging and age-related neurodegenerative
disorders.
Center scientists are focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in development and
progression of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and related
dementias and stroke, and are seeking new knowledge breakthroughs to combat these diseases of
the elderly.
The ultimate goal of the SBCoA is to catalyze innovative and outstanding research while ensuring
a more rapid rate of progress toward new therapies to delay or prevent age-related brain disorders,
so that our human volunteers, patients and caregivers become the beneciaries of our advances in
knowledge
In 1985, the SBCoA was named as an Alzheimers Disease Center, one of the original ten centers
funded by the National Institute on Aging. The University of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Center (UK-
ADC) supports and facilitates research aimed at elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the
transitions from normal cognitive aging to the development of cognitive impairment, with a long-term
goal of enabling more effective translation of this mechanistic knowledge to intervention strategies. The
UK-ADC also promotes education and outreach, provides clinical and neuropathological diagnoses
and care of patients with cognitive impairment, and runs an active clinical trials program to test potential
new therapies. These activities are critical because, with the aging of the population worldwide, age-
related cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease are reaching epidemic proportions requiring
a desperate need to identify strategies for effective therapeutic intervention.
Website: http://www.uky.edu/coa/
City: Lexington / KY
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Alzheimer‘s disease and neurodegenerative diseases
Stroke
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
166
Sau Po Centre on Ageing
About:
Hong Kong has been an aging society since 1990s. It is estimated that in 2041, 30% of its population
will be aged 65 or above. At the same time, the elderly dependency ratio is projected to rise to 497,
which will represent a 1.94 times increase as compared with that in 2011. They believe that this
demographic change will bring challenges as well as opportunities.
In picturing ourselves in a society in the year of 2041, they are more passionate than ever in contributing
new and effective solutions that are highly sensitive to the needs of older adults, their families, and
the communities at large so that all will benet from the advances in knowledge. They are also taking
a leading role in educating and mentoring the next generation of social gerontologists and health
professionals through our Master of Social Sciences (Gerontology) and research postgraduate
programs.
The Centre focuses on enhancing the quality of life of elderly through gerontology research. They
have a strong research team which comprises experts in different areas of gerontology. The team
investigates into various ageing-related issues through multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural studies in
conjunction with local and overseas experts.
Other than the research themes, Their researchers also look into issues faced by different populations.
For example, the team has devoted a lot of effort in dementia studies such as non-pharmacological
interventions (e.g. cognitive stimulation therapy) and caregiver support for dementia patients. They
have developed family-based intervention programme for caregivers of stroke patients. They also
investigates into the difference in ageing process between people with Down syndrome and the
general public, and examine how physical tness and functioning of adults with Down syndrome
changes when they age. Many of Their projects involve community engagement of both frail and
healthy older people. This effectively promotes elderly volunteerism as empowerment which enforces
productive aging and a thriving society.
Website: http://ageing.hku.hk
City: Hong Kong
Country: China
Mission/Research Topics:
Health Ageing
Geriatric and long-term care
Financial security and housing
Cross-cultural psychosocial gerontology
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
167
School of Aging Studies
About:
Welcome to the School of Aging Studies in the College of Behavioral and Community Sciences at the
University of South Florida.
The University of South Florida School of Aging Studies, formerly Department of Gerontology,
was established in 1967. It is one of the nation’s oldest and largest degree-awarding programs
in Gerontology. Its graduate and undergraduate degree programs are multidisciplinary. Its faculty
members have degrees in diverse areas including Aging Studies, Anthropology, Economics, Education,
Gerontology, Law, Medicine, Neurosciences, Nursing, Pharmacology, Political Science, Psychology,
Public Administration, Public Health, Social Work, and Sociology. Faculty bring their expertise in these
scholarly and professional areas, and their specialized experience in gerontology, to bear on the many
complex issues faced in understanding the biological, psychological, social, and public policy aspects
of aging.
Its faculty are engaged in extensive research activities concentrated in three areas; Aging and Health;
Cognitive Aging and Alzheimers Disease; and Public Policy and Long-Term Care. They have a
particular emphasis on applied research that is aimed at improving clinical practice, public policy, and
the well-being of older adults and their families.
They offer programs that can be completed by full-time or part-time students and most of our degree
programs allow students a great deal of freedom in choosing electives that suit their interests. At
the undergraduate level, the School of Aging Studies offers courses of study leading to a minor
in Gerontology, Bachelor of Arts in Gerontology, and Bachelor of Science in Long-Term Care
Administration.
At the graduate level, they offer a Master of Arts in Gerontology. The Department also hosts the
University-wide interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Aging Studies program. They also offer several graduate
certicate programs which can be completed without having to take the GRE or be formally admitted
to the graduate program. These include the Graduate Certicate in Gerontology, the Advanced
Graduate Certicate in Gerontology, and the Advanced Graduate Certicate in Geriatric Social Work/
Clinical Gerontology.
Website: http://www.usf.edu/cbcs/aging-studies/
City: Tampa / FL
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Ageing and health
Cognitive ageing and Alzheimer‘s disease
Public policy and long-term care
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
168
S
mart Ageing International Research Center (SAIRC)
About:
The Smart Ageing International Research Center (SAIRC) was founded on October 1st 2009. This
center proposes the creation of a new eld of science to produce well-rounded personnel who have
gained “totally comprehensive intelligence” from their experiences, in order to aid society in coping
with the various problems associated with a diverse and complex super-aging society. To this end,
the Center will promote interdisciplinary cooperative research, international collaborative research
projects, and research collaborations with industry, as well as disseminate and facilitate exchange of
information by holding international conferences and symposia.
The percentage of elderly people in Japan age 65 years or over (aging ratio) was 22.0% in 2008, an
unprecedented ratio making Japan the world’s rst super-aging society. In the 2020s, it is estimated
that the aging population percentage will exceed 30%, urgently necessitating the formulation
of specic countermeasures against a super-aging society. It is obvious that without intelligent
personnel willing and capable of concentrating their ability dealing with aging-related problems, a
prescription for accommodating growth in the super-aging society cannot be developed. At present
industry, government and academia around the world are not prepared to cultivate human resources
that can address the needs of the unprecedented super-aging population. Their center is a step
toward addressing and more importantly meeting those needs. With the shared objective of creating
a “smart aging” research eld that will help individuals and society age and mature intellectually, the
center will gather researchers who have been conducting state-of-the-art aging-related research in
the elds of natural science, humanities, and sociology to establish an interdisciplinary and integrated
educational research system, and cultivate human resources capable of comprehensively coping with
the problems super-aging societies face.
Website: http://www2.idac.tohoku.ac.jp/dep/sairc/index.html
City: Sendai
Country: Japan
Mission/Research Topics:
Functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in humans
Intervention methods for maintaining and improving cognitive functions
Entertainment and smart ageing
Development of high precision imaging and sensor technologies
Biomedical engineering evaluation of skin conditions
Evaluation of Atherosclerosis
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
169
Stanford / VA Alzheimer‘s Research Center
About:
The Stanford Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC) is part of a nationwide network of
Alzheimer’s Disease Centers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The centers work
together to translate research advances into improved diagnosis and care for people with Alzheimer’s
disease and related brain disorders. The ultimate goals are to cure Alzheimer’s disease and, even
more important, to prevent it from developing.
The clinical and research focus of the Stanford ADRC includes both Alzheimers disease and
Parkinson’s disease. They are the most common and the second most common neurodegenerative
disorders.
The Stanford ADRC has particular strengths in neuroimmunity, synapse biology, brain imaging, clinical
assessment and clinical research, biostatistics and bioinformatics, epidemiology, and caregiver
outreach. Our outreach activities include Latino and American Indian communities in the Bay Area.
Its ADRC partners include Stanford Medicine, the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, the Palo Alto
Medical Foundation Research Institute, and the Northern California and Northern Nevada chapter of
the Alzheimer’s Association. The ADRC have strong ties to the Pacic Udall Center, the Stanford
Neurosciences Institute and other Stanford centers.
Website: http://med.stanford.edu/svalz.html
City: Palo Alto / CA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI)
Medication reassessment in Alzheimer‘s disease patients
Sleep disorders in Alzheimer‘s patients
Psychosocial factors in Alzheimer‘s disease progression
Sexuality in Alzheimer‘s disease
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
170
Stanford Center on Longevity (SCL)
About:
Longer lives are, at once, among the most remarkable achievements in all of human history and
the greatest challenges of the 21st century. Whereas most discussions about aging societies are
premised on the assumption that older people are frail and inrm, our premise is that problems of
older people demand solutions so that the substantial increase in life expectancy can ultimately
benet individuals and societies. The mission of the Stanford Center on Longevity is to accelerate and
implement scientic discoveries, technological advances, behavioral practices, and social norms so
that century long lives are healthy and rewarding.
It is a center on longevity, not old age, because building a world where the majority of people thrive
in old age requires attention to the entire life span. Research shows clearly that education, exercise,
nutritional habits, nancial decisions, and social choices early in life have substantial implications for
quality of life at advanced ages. Increased longevity demands that they reconsider traditional models
of the life course which will necessitate new norms and practices for education, work and families that
span multiple generations.
To inspire change on a grand scale, the Center works with more than 150 Stanford faculty, their
students and research staffs, as well as leaders from industries that are poised to distribute innovative
products and services to the public, thought leaders who help to shape the ideas that inuence cultural
change, and policy makers who target important challenges and opportunities for long lived societies.
By fostering dialogue and collaborations among these typically disconnected worlds, the Center aims
to develop workable solutions for urgent issues confronting the world as the population ages. With
these partners, they aim to redesign how we live our lives so that the great potential of longer life is
fully realized.
Website: http://longevity3.stanford.edu
City: Stanford / CA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Mind - early detection of decline, behavioral and biological interventions, and decision aids
Mobility - promote lifelong mobility by preventing or reducing barriers to physical movement
Financial security - products, technologies, fraud and nancial education that will help people
better plan, save for their futures and guard against nancial fraud
Demographics - economic and political implications of population ageing around the world as
people live longer and have fewer children
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
171
The Center for Healthy Ageing
About:
Our society is rapidly aging and more people are living longer than ever before. This increase in
longevity presents both exciting opportunities and urgent challenges to society. Some of these
challenges include managing an increasingly older workforce, controlling health care costs and
informing policies that support an older and more active population. Promoting healthy aging in the
21st century requires a better understanding of how social, psychological and biological processes
interact to confer either risk or resilience for the aging individual.
The mission of the Center for Healthy Aging is to facilitate research that promotes emotional,
physical, and cognitive health in adulthood. A major strength of our center is its interdisciplinary and
developmental approach to research on health and well-being in adulthood. Investigators in our center
study the ways in which our everyday experiences behaviors inuence our health and quality of life. To
achieve its mission, the Center’s efforts are concentrated on:
1. Stimulating the interdisciplinary study of aging within and across the biological, behavioral and
social sciences and conducting cutting-edge research that tackles prominent questions of aging and
old age;
2. Coordinating new interdisciplinary partnerships to develop innovative programs of research and
education that capture the complexities and inter-connections of aging issues;
3. Translating research advancements into practical understandings and interventions and promoting
sound policy to enhance the quality of life and promote the health and welfare of our citizens;
4. Offering post-graduate, graduate and undergraduate students excellent training in contemporary
issues of aging and old age and instruction in state-of-the-art methodological tools suited to the study
of aging.
Website: http://healthyaging.psu.edu
City: University Park / PA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Developmental methodology
Daily experiences
Health behaviors
Work-family health
Interventions for healthy ageing
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
172
The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer‘s Disease
Research Center (Knight ADRC)
About:
The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (Knight ADRC) is part of the
Department of Neurology, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
The Washington University Knight ADRC is one of 29 centers funded by the National Institute on
Aging with the collective aim of facilitating advanced research on clinical, genetic, neuropathological,
neuroanatomical, biomedical, psychosocial, and neuropsychological aspects of Alzheimer’s disease
and related brain disorders.
The Center and its clinical research arm - the Memory and Aging Project (MAP) along with the
Memory and Aging Project Satellite (MAPS) - are at the forefront of a worldwide effort to uncover
key causal factors in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, with a goal of developing more
effective treatments and an eventual cure. Since 2000, the Center is guided by an African American
Advisory Board (AAAB) on matters of cultural sensitivity and research inclusion.
Website: http://alzheimers.med.umich.edu/
City: St. Louis / MO
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Biomedical aspects
Clinical aspects
Genetic aspects
Neuroanatomical aspects
Neuropathological aspects
Neuropsychological aspects
Psychosocial aspects
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
173
Tulane Center for Aging
About:
One of the nation’s most recognized centers for medical education, Tulane University School of
Medicine is a vibrant center for education, research and public service. Tulane University School of
Medicine is the second-oldest medical school in the Deep South and the 15th oldest medical school in
the United States. Tulane School of Medicine is fully accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical
Education.
The demographic reality today and in the foreseeable future is a graying population, both in terms
of an increase in life expectancy and in the number of people over the age of 65. The retirement of
the baby boomers, 77 million strong, will place a strain on Social Security and Medicare in the next
decades. Only a compression of morbidity, coupled to changes in health systems management and
healthcare delivery, can relieve this pressure. This will require signicant research effort, in biological
sciences, clinical medicine, behavioral and social sciences, as well as demography, economics, and
policy planning. The research will engage basic, clinical, and translational scientists in multidisciplinary
teams. The issues surrounding the expansion of the elder population transcend medicine and
public health. The design and implementation of elder-friendly communities is emerging rapidly with
abundant economic impact on this state and country. Furthermore, the increase in elder health that is
an essential social and economic imperative will require planning for second and even third careers.
The concept of ‘active retirement’ is taking on new meaning under current economic conditions. This
in turn engages universities in forms of continuing education that have yet to be thoroughly explored,
and it also has important implications for the model of the workplace.
Website: http://medicine.tulane.edu
City: New Orleans / LA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Cardiovascular ageing
Endocrine function, obesity, and musculoskeletal aging
Genetics and epigenetics
Health systems
Immunosenescence
Neurocognitive ageing, neurodegeneration, and dementia
Proliferative Homeostasis, cancer, and ageing
Regenerative medicine and translation
Systems biology of ageing
The Tulane Center for Aging is dedicated to the enhancement of the quality of life of an aging population
through research, education, and innovative approaches to healthcare and community planning and
design.
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
174
UAB Center for Aging
About:
The Center’s mission and goals are met through a wide variety of programs under the overall
supervision of the director, Cynthia J. Brown, MD, MSPH. Dr. Brown reports to the Vice President
for Research and ten sponsoring school and college deans. The director, associate and assistant
directors serve as the Executive Committee and provide leadership and oversight for all aspects of
the Center’s programs.
The Steering Committee includes all the members of the Executive Committee and additional faculty
members appointed by the director and sponsoring deans to assist with providing guidance for the
development, on-going evaluation, and administration of the Center’s programs.
External Advisory Committee of nationally recognized experts in aging meets every two to three years
to provide recommendations about the Center’s programs to the Director and the Steering Committee.
In addition, Deans, Department Chairs, and other Center Directors provide ongoing guidance on how
the Center can most effectively carry out its mission. A Community Advisory Committee of community
leaders with interests in the problems of older adults meets regularly with the Center Director to
provide recommendations that will help the Center be more responsive to the needs of older adults in
the community. A Board of Advocacy provides guidance and leadership for community outreach and
development activities.
Website: http://www.uab.edu/medicine/aging/
City: Birmingham / AL
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Clinical - mobility, muscle loss (sarcopenia), exercise, genito-urinary disorders such as incontinence,
end-of-life and advanced illness care, Alzheimer‘s disease and other memory disorders, stroke,
vision, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, age-related cancers, nutrition, and heart failure
Social and behavioral - interventions to prevent and treat age-related disorders and caregiver
stress
Basic biomedical - molecular genetics and cellular biology of ageing and age-related diseases,
such as atherosclerosis, Alzheimer‘s disease, and osteoporosis
Public policy - health services delivery, economics of ageing, health care quality, long-term care,
and transportation
Neuroscience - ageing and memory
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
175
UCLA Longevity Center
About:
Since 1991, the UCLA Longevity Center has focused on helping people live better, longer. It achieves
this mission through cutting-edge research, innovative education, comprehensive patient care, and
effective community service. By translating scientic discoveries into practical applications, the Center
has distinguished itself as a pioneering leader in the eld of longevity and aging well.
The Center’s commitment to improving quality of life focuses on early detection and prevention of
age-related maladies, including memory loss and cognitive decline. Research shows that age is the
single greatest risk factor for developing memory loss. With Baby Boomers now beginning to turn 65,
they are reaching the age when risk for Alzheimer’s disease climbs to 10 percent. According to the
United States Census Bureau, by 2050, people 65 and over will comprise more than 20 percent of
the U.S. population. Today, ve-million-plus Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s disease—a number
projected to triple in the next few decades. UCLA scientists and others will continue to pursue a cure.
In the meantime, they have made great strides in our understanding of both genetic and non-genetic
factors that impact Alzheimer’s risk, and current treatments are helping patients live productive lives
much longer than ever before.
Website: http://www.semel.ucla.edu/longevity
City: Los Angeles / CA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Comparison of Levomilnacipran to Placebo in Older Adults with Depression
Health Education and Wellness for Older Adults
Late-Life Depression and Memory Research Study
Optimize Your Treatment for Depressio
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
176
UCSF Memory and Aging Center
About:
The mission of the UCSF Memory and Aging Center is to provide the highest quality of care for
individuals with cognitive problems, conduct research on the causes and cures for degenerative brain
diseases, and educate health professionals, patients, and their families.
From heart disease and immunology to specialty services for women and children, UCSF brings
together the world’s leading experts in nearly every area of health. They are home to ve Nobel
laureates who have advanced the understanding of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, HIV/AIDS,
aging and stem cell research. UCSF Medical Center, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals, all four of
their professional schools — dentistry, medicine, nursing and pharmacy— and many UCSF graduate
programs consistently rank among the best in the country.
UCSF is a collection of dedicated scientists, clinicians, students and staff who share a common drive
to make the world a better place by advancing health and the human condition. Care and compassion
are as critical as science and discovery in fullling our mission to drive change, and make a difference
for individual patients and whole populations.
In a eld where lives often hang in a delicate balance, UCSF recognizes that time is of the essence
for patients in the hospital and for populations facing an epidemic. They harness the efciency of
multidisciplinary teams to accelerate learning and scientic progress and speed the development
of new therapies and cures. They are constantly pushing forward the policies and partnerships that
ensure that people in need are getting access to the most cutting-edge care and treatment.
UCSF is also San Francisco’s second-largest employer — attracting talented faculty and staff who
mirror the energy and entrepreneurial spirit of the Bay Area. Their ability to recruit top talent leads to
a constant inux of new ideas and approaches across each of our missions: research, patient care
and education.
Website: http://memory.ucsf.edu
City: San Fransisco / CA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Alzheimer‘s disease
Corticobasal degeneration
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
Frontotemporal dementia
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI)
Progressive supranuclear palsy
Vascular dementia
Healthy ageing
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
177
USC Davis School of Gerontology & Ethel Percy Andrus
Gerontology Center
About:
Founded in 1975, the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology is the oldest and largest school of its
type in the world. They offer the most comprehensive selection of gerontology degree programs found
anywhere, a variety of outstanding research opportunities and a challenging yet supportive academic
environment.
As a small school rooted in a world-class research university located in the heart of one of the most
important cities on earth, the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology—and its research and
services arm, the Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center—are home to today’s leaders in the eld,
as well as to tomorrow’s.
Their program studies the human lifespan by exploring the biological, psychological, sociological,
political, medical and business dimensions of adult life. The curriculum is aimed at equipping future
professionals in the eld of aging with the specic skills and knowledge necessary to respond
effectively to the needs of an aging population.
With a distinguished faculty representing various disciplines, the School is able to offer students a
wide range of scientic and professional gerontology courses.
Website: http://gero.usc.edu
City: Los Angeles / CA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Demography
Molecular biology
Neuroscience
Psychology
Public policy
Sociology
Top 100 Research Labs in Geroscience
178
USC/UCLA Center of Biodemography & Population Health
(CBPH)
About:
The USC/UCLA Center on Biodemography and Population Health (CBPH) is a multisite center
located at the Andrus Gerontology Center of the University of Southern California and the Program in
Geriatric Medicine in the School of Medicine of the University of California at Los Angeles. It is one of
14 centers in the Demography and Economics of Aging Centers Program sponsored by the National
Institute on Aging (NIA).
The primary purpose of the CBPH is to provide a synergistic research environment for the integration
and translation of research ndings from a variety of disciplines to understand population health.
The Center takes a multidisciplinary approach by linking demographers, biologists, economists,
psychologists, epidemiologists, health policy specialists, medical researchers and clinical geriatricians.
This integration of biological, epidemiologic and medical risk information which characterizes Center
research is fundamental to understanding and projecting demographic trends and differences in
population health.
Website: http://gero.usc.edu/CBPH/
City: Los Angeles / CA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Provide a synergistic research environment for the integration and translation of research ndings
from a variety of disciplines to understand population health.
Link demographers, biologists, economists, psychologists, epidemiologists, health policy
specialists, medical researchers and clinical geriatricians. U
Understanding and projecting demographic trends and differences in population health.
Top 100 Longevity
Non-Prots
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Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
180
1. Age Institute
2. Alberta Centre on Aging
3. Alzheimer‘s and Aging Research Center
4. Alzheimer‘s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center
5. Alzheimer’s Research UK
6. American Aging Association
7. ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CE-
PAR)
8. Baycrest Research Centre for Aging and the Brain
9. Betterhumans
10. Biogerontology Research Foundation
11. Brain Preservation Foundation
12. Brookdale Center for Healthy Aging
13. Buck Institute for Research on Aging
14. Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging (From Research to Action)
CCAA
15. Centre for Active Management of Lifelong Ageing (CAMLA)
16. Centre for Ageing and Pastoral Studies (CAPS)
17. Centre for Ageing and Supportive Environments (CASE)
18. Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland (CARDI)
19. Centre for Cultural Diversity in Ageing
20. Centre for Policy on Ageing (CPA)
21. Centre for Social Gerontology
22. Centre on Aging
23. Center for Aging & Community (CAC), University of Indianapolis
24. Center on Aging
25. Comprehensive Center on Brain Aging - An NYULMC Center of
Excellence
26. Danish Aging Research Center (DARC)
27. Danish Centre for Molecular Gerontology (DCMG)
28. Del E. Webb Neuroscience, Aging and Stem Cell Research
Center (NASCR)
29. Dementia Collaborative Research Centres (DCRC)
30. Dementia Research Centre (DRC)
31. Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging and Department of Geri-
atrics
32. ELPIs Foundation for Indenite Lifespans
33. European Centre for Gerontology
34. Fischer Center for Alzheimer‘s Disease Research
35. Flinders Centre for Ageing Studies (FCAS)
36. Forever Healthy Foundation
37. Fundación Vidaplus
38. Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Centers (GRECC)
39. Geriatrics (Yale University)
40. German Centre for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)
41. German Centre of Gerontology (DZA)
42. Gerontology Research Center (GRC)
43. Gerontology Research Group (GRG)
44. Gerontology Research Unit
45. Glenn Center for Aging Research
46. Global Healthspan Policy Institute
47. Harvey A. Friedman Center for Aging
48. Heales
49. Health Extension
50. Healthspan Campaign
51. Hufngton Center on Aging (HCOA)
52. Institute for Life Course and Aging
53. Institute of Gerontology (IFG)
54. International Institute on Ageing
55. International Longevity Alliance
56. International Longevity Centre - UK
57. International Research Centre for Healthy Ageing and Longevity
(IRCHAL)
58. Irish Centre for Social Gerontology (ICSG)
59. K-State Center on Aging
60. Landon Center on Aging
61. Life Extension Advocacy Foundation
62. Lifespan.io
63. LongeCity
64. Longevity Institute
65. Major Mouse Testing Program
66. Maximum Life Foundation
67. Max Planck International Research Network on Aging (MaxNetAg-
ing)
68. Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing
Research
69. Mercer‘s Institute for Research on Ageing (MIRA)
70. Methuselah Foundation
71. Michiana Gerontology Institute (MGI)
72. Monash Research for an Ageing Society (MonRAS)
73. Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA)
74. Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging
75. Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging -
The Jackson Laboratory
76. National Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics «Ana Aslan»
77. National Resource Center on LGBT Aging (LGBT - lesbian, gay,
bisexual and transgender)
78. Newfoundland & Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research
(NLCAHR)
79. New Organ Prize
80. NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre
81. NYC Elder Abuse Center (NYCEAC)
82. Pacic Parkinson‘s Research Centre (PPRC)
83. Palo Alto Longevity Prize
84. Population Aging Research Center (PARC)
85. Population Studies Center (PSC)
86. RAND Center for the Study of Aging
87. Regenerative Sciences Institute
88. Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR)
89. Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA)
90. Science for life extension foundation
91. SENS Research Foundation
92. Shefeld Institute for Studies on Ageing (SISA)
93. Society for the Rescue of our Elders
94. SRI International Center for Health Sciences
95. The Dunhill Medical Trust
96. The Parkinson‘s Institute and Clinical Center (The PI)
97. UCSD Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging
(SIRA)
98. UCSF Institute for Health & Aging (IHA)
99. Virtual Institute of Neurodegeneration & Ageing
100. Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases (Wolfson CARD)
Top 100 Longevity Non-Prots
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
181
Age Institute
About:
The Age Institute studies the everyday lives of older adults, develops services for older people,
produces new innovations for older adults and their families, disseminates information about the
results of new studies, offers training to professionals, and participates in current discussion on age
related issues, values and attitudes.
The Age Institute:
Produces and assists in applying research-based knowledge of ageing, older persons’ daily lives
and services for older persons
Produces good practices for older persons, their relatives and professionals
Supports the implementation of new knowledge, informs and inuences through training and use
of media.
Website: http://www.ikainstituutti./in+english/
City: Helsinki
Country: Finland
Mission/Research Topics:
Physical exercise, functional capacity, and health
Encounter, inclusion, and mental well-being
The mission is to produce and disseminate knowledge that can be used to promote good ageing
and good old age.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
182
Alberta Centre on Aging
About:
It is an interdisciplinary research and network centre dedicated to the promotion and dissemination
of research into ageing. The mission is to promote cutting-edge research, education, and service
in ageing, through interdisciplinary collaboration and through partnerships with stakeholders. The
Centre‘s focus is on the promotion of best outcomes for older people, to engage the community and
to link researchers.
The study of aging and it’s consequences is inherently interdisciplinary. Many faculty members and
students from a variety of disciplines across the campus have an interest in aging. Each discipline
has a unique perspective and makes improtant contributions that enhance our understanding of this
important eld. The study of aging, age related disease, and the social impacts of aging occur across
many areas of the university. Their researchers are a diverse collection of individuals: the ACA exists
to bring these people together and promote collaborative work to further their aims.
Website: http://www.aging.ualberta.ca/
City: Edmonton
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Foster, promote and monitor research excellence through facilitation,
networking and research mentoring.
Maintain connections between aging researchers and professionals across
disciplines and organizations.
Disseminate knowledge to stakeholders and the community regarding the
latest research on aging and aging-related topics.
Provide leadership in public education, communication and promotion of
research within the lay community.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
183
Alzheimer‘s and Aging Research Center
About:
The Alzheimer’s and Aging Research Center supports research of Alzheimers disease and other
aging-related diseases. They fund research which is focused on nding treatments for these diseases,
and they provide information to the scientic community and to the general public worldwide, via
scientic publications and presentations, brochures, a website, and other reports. They also support
research training for high school, undergraduate and graduate students, and to visiting research
scholars from countries worldwide.
Affecting an estimated 4 million people in the United States, Alzheimer’s disease is the most common
cause of brain disruption in older people.
The research centre supports biomedical research directed towards further increasing our
understanding of the ageing process, allowing seniors to live ever fuller and more enjoyable lives. The
research focuses on Alzheimer´s disease and other ageing-related diseases, especially on nding
treatments for these diseases. The Center provides information to the scientic community and the
public and supports education and training.
Since 1995, the scientists they support have been conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease and
other aging-related diseases, presenting the results to the public, and training students. They make
it a priority to ensure that the research results are shared with the public throughout the world, and
they also work to foster international scientic collaborations between our scientists and others who
specialize in this eld.
The effect of Alzheimer’s weighs heavily on the shoulders of society. Many spouses, relatives, and
friends take care of people with Alzheimer’s. As they watch their loved ones become more forgetful
and frustrated, they too, experience the mental, physical, and nancial burden. The estimated annual
costs for Alzheimer’s patients are close to $50 billion. Their intent is to increase the understanding of
the aging process and make discoveries to allow seniors to have fuller, more enjoyable lives.
Website: http://www.aging-research.org/index.html
City: Port St. Lucie / FL
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Alzheimer‘s disease
Cardiovascular diseases
Diabetes
Osteoarthritis
Osteoporosis
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
184
Alzheimer‘s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR)
Center
About:
The ADEAR Center is a service of the National Institute on Aging (NIA), one of the Federal Government’s
National Institutes of Health and part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The NIA
conducts and supports research about health issues for older people, and is the primary Federal
agency for Alzheimer’s disease research.
The ADEAR Center distributes information about Alzheimer‘s disease to health professionals, patients
and their families, and the public. They provide articles and video which in popular form explain how
this disease progress and what can help.
Website: https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers
City: Silver Spring / MD
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Support and conduct genetic, biological, clinical, behavioral, social, and economic research on
aging.
Foster the development of research and clinician scientists in aging.
Disseminate information about aging and advances in research to the public, health care
professionals, and the scientic community, among a variety of audiences.
Fund extramural research at universities and medical centers across the United States and
around the world.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
185
Alzheimers Research UK
About:
Alzheimer’s Research UK is a company limited by guarantee and a registered charity. They are
governed by a Board of Trustees, the Charity’s board of directors.
The Board’s role is to set the Charity’s strategic direction. The Board monitors the delivery of the
Charity’s objectives, upholds its values and governance, and advises and supports the Chief Executive,
who leads the Executive Management Team towards achieving the Charity’s vision and purpose.
Alzheimer’s Research UK is working tirelessly to defeat dementia, but it takes more than a single
organisation to tackle a challenge this big. That’s why they work to ensure dementia is at the top of
the political agenda, bringing together policymakers and other inuential organisations who make a
vital contribution to the ght against the condition.
Without effective treatments, one in three children born today will die with dementia. Today, there are
no dementia survivors but research can change this.
Alzheimer’s Research UK is the world’s leading dementia research charity dedicated to causes,
diagnosis, prevention, treatment and cure. Backed by their passionate scientists and supporters,
they’re challenging the way people think about dementia, uniting the big thinkers in the eld and
funding the innovative science that will deliver a cure.
Website: https://www.alzheimersresearchuk.org/
City: Great Abington
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Understand the diseases that cause dementia.
Diagnose people earlier and more accurately.
Reduce risk, backed by the latest evidence.
Treat dementia effectively.
Their mission is to bring about the rst life-changing dementia treatment by 2025.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
186
American Aging Association
About:
The American Aging Association was launched at a special luncheon meeting at the Waldorf-Astoria
in New York City, October 19, 1970. Organized by a group of distinguished medical doctors and
scientists who wanted a specic organization dedicated to aging research.
The members of the American Aging Association are an elite group of scientic experts in the eld of
biogerontology and geroscience, dedicated to understanding the basic mechanisms of aging in order
to enable humankind to preserve and restore functions typically lost to age-related degeneration,
and to extend the healthy human lifespan. The American Aging Association Trainee Chapter offers
numerous benets to learners at all levels. These include the opportunity to win presentation and
travel awards, career development, and networking with other trainees and some of the world’s top
geroscientists and biogerontologists.
Each year, the Association provides an annual conference to share aging research and to recognize
and award young investigators with disciplines in aging research. In the early years, the meeting
rotated between New York City, Washington, D.C. and San Francisco. Currently, the conference
locations are selected throughout the United States and are held in the rst week of June.
Website: https://www.americanagingassociation.org/
City: Grandville, MI
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
To promote biomedical aging studies directed towards increasing the functional life span of
humans with one goal being to slow the aging process
To keep the public informed of the progress of aging research and of practical
means of achieving a long and healthy life
To increase knowledge of biogerontology among physicians and others in the
health elds
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
187
ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research
(CEPAR)
About:
Based at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) with nodes at the Australian National University
(ANU), The University of Melbourne, The University of Sydney and The University of Western
Australia (UWA), the ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR) is producing
world-class research on population ageing. The Centre is a unique collaboration bringing together
academia, government and industry to address one of the major social challenges of the twenty rst
century. CEPAR‘s mission is to produce research of the highest quality to transform thinking about
population ageing, inform product and service development and provision (private practice) and public
policy, and improve people‘s wellbeing throughout their lives.
Their innovative research is providing global solutions to the economic and social challenges of
population ageing and building a new generation of researchers to global standard with an appreciation
of the multidisciplinary nature of population ageing.
Website: http://www.cepar.edu.au/
City: Sydney
Country: NSW Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
Causes & Consequences of Demographic Change
Cognition & Decision Making
Macro-Demographic Dynamics & Population Ageing Policy
Decision Making, Expectations and Cognitive Ageing
Organisations and the Mature Workforce
Sustainable Wellbeing in Later Life
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
188
Baycrest Research Centre for Aging and the Brain
About:
Baycrest Health Sciences is a global leader in geriatric residential living, healthcare, research,
innovation and education, with a special focus on brain health and aging.
As an academic health sciences centre fully afliated with the University of Toronto, Baycrest provides
an exemplary care experience for aging clients combined with an extensive clinical training program
for students and one of the world’s top research institutes in cognitive neuroscience. Through its
commercial and consulting arms, Baycrest is marketing its sought-after expertise and innovation to
other healthcare organizations and long-term care homes, both in Canada and internationally.
Founded in 1918 as the Jewish Home for the Aged, Baycrest continues to embrace the long-standing
tradition of all great Jewish healthcare institutions to improve the well-being of people in their local
communities and around the globe.
Baycrest is a leader in cognitive neuroscience and memory research, with the goal of transforming
the journey of ageing. The Rotman Research Institute (RRI) and the Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied and
Evaluative Research Unit (KLAERU) are parts of Baycrest. The primary research focus of the RRI
is on memory and the executive (frontal lobe) functions of the brain, both in normal aging and in the
presence of diseases and conditions which affect the brain, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury,
Alzheimer‘s disease and other dementias. KLAERU provides resources and expertise to support
clinical, evaluative, and translational research at Baycrest. At KLAERU, the development and
implementation of innovative wellness, prevention, education and care projects is supported across
Baycrest.
Baycrest has a bold vision for the future, and a solid ve-year strategy that takes into account the
changing healthcare environment in Ontario.
Website: http://www.baycrest.org/research/
City: Toronto
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Memory and ageing
Neuroscience of cognition and ageing
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
189
Betterhumans
About:
Betterhumans Inc. is the latest iteration of this concept. Operating as a Florida non-prot corporation,
the short-term goals of Betterhumans are extending healthy maximum human lifespan and greatly
reducing the risk of disease.
Its goal, as a non-prot, is to develop therapies that can be offered at the lowest cost possible. Stem
cell transplants and gene therapy upgrades (such as improved health and lifespan) should not cost
you the equivalent of buying a car, it should be as affordable as a new cell phone or laptop. They hope
to pioneer storefront clinics that can provide these upgrades so that anyone over the age of 65 can
afford them, and can participate in the wave of Exponential Technology in the bio-medical eld that
will propel us into an unlimited future of lasting health and youth. All discoveries will be offered under
a Creative Commons Public Patent License format, or the equivalent.
Betterhumans has a long history in the eld of transhumanism. It was started as an educational
website (www.betterhumans.com) in mid-2001 and evolved to become a popular website presenting
ideas and news about Exponential Technologies. It ceased operating as a website around late 2008,
when h+ Magazine took over its functions. Betterhumans, which then included James Clement and
Dan Stoicescu, produced ve bi-monthly issues of the transhumanist-tech magazine h+ with RU
Sirius as Editor.
This new iteration of Betterhumans is the most aggressive yet. They will shortly be putting out new
information about how ordinary people can modify their diet and lifestyle to take advantage of some
of the latest ndings in scientic research. Their research team is focused on bringing cutting-
edge scientic discoveries from the lab to the clinic, so that humanity can take advantage of these
breakthroughs in a safe and inexpensive manner, as quickly as possible.
Website: http://www.betterhumans.com/
City: LaFayette / LA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Improve human cognition and wellbeing
Upgrade those biological features that are important to us
Seek to develop therapies that can be offered at the lowest cost possible.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
190
Biogerontology Research Foundation
About:
The BGRF has been constituted as a charity in the UK to support the application of our knowledge of
the mechanisms of ageing to the relief of disability, suffering and disease in old age. The objective of
research conducted or funded by the Biogerontology Research Foundation (the BGRF) is to produce
effective cures or treatments for the diseases and frailty commonly associated with ageing in the
human population.
The Foundation aims to create biomedical interventions to address the deleterious alterations which
occur in the bio-molecules and cells of the body as a side effect of normal metabolism (often referred
to as “ageing damage”), and which accumulate over the course of life, eventually causing the diseases
of ageing.
Website: http://www.bg-rf.org.uk/
City: London
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Fill this gap within the research community whereby the current scientic
understanding of the ageing process is not yet being sufciently exploited to
produce effective medical interventions.
Fund research which, building on the body of knowledge about how ageing
happens, will develop biotechnological interventions to prevent or remediate
the molecular and cellular decits which accumulate with age and which underlie
the ill-health of old age.
The BGRF will seek appropriate Intellectual Property protection to encourage
industry to apply the results of their projects quickly. Their long-term goal is to
provide medical practitioners with the tools they need to enable effective and
lasting remedies for the illnesses and disabilities of old age.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
191
Brain Preservation Foundation
About:
The central objective of the Brain Preservation Foundation is to promote scientic research and
services development in the eld of whole brain preservation for long-term static storage. Through
outreach to appropriate scientic communities, online activities, presentations and articles, directed
research grants, challenge prizes, and other methods, we seek to explore the scientic hypothesis
of whether a reliable surgical procedure exists that is capable of preserving the neural circuitry of the
human brain at nanometer scale.
Website: http://www.brainpreservation.org/
City: Ashburn / VA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
To promote scientic research and services development in the eld of whole
brain preservation for long-term static storage.
Through outreach to appropriate scientic communities, online activities,
presentations and articles, directed research grants, challenge prizes, and other
methods.
Explore the scientic hypothesis of whether a reliable surgical procedure exists
capable of preserving the neural circuitry of the human brain at nanometer
scale.
Seek to advance public understanding of the self, of our brains as physical,
chemical, and biological carriers of our “internal self”, of our social relationships
and environment as aspects of our “external self”.
Should any brain preservation technology be proven to work, we will make
every effort to help that technology become as affordable and legally available
as possible, for use in hospitals, hospices, and homes around the world.
BPF’s social mission is to help individuals preserve, use, and improve their brains
to the greatest degree possible, both now and in the future.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
192
Brookdale Center for Healthy Aging
About:
The Brookdale Center for Healthy Aging improves the lives of older adults through research, policy,
and professional development.
Brookdale faculty and staff engage in research, policy analysis, and policy development. They
are a leading provider of education and professional development services, including curriculum
development and training on issues related to aging, elder law, and elder justice.
Website: https://brookdale.org/
City: New York / NY
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Brookdale improves the lives of older adults through research, advocacy, policy, and professional
development. We work in partnership with a wide range of agencies and non-governmental
organizations to:
Promote ethical treatment of older adults and other vulnerable populations in social service and
healthcare systems
Explore the social, political, legal, and economic climate affecting health and quality of life of
older adults
Identify inequities in the access to and experience of care
Design programs that build the capacity of older adults and other vulnerable populations to live
independently and with dignity in the community
Develop educational curricula and training for professionals who work with older adults so as to
facilitate equity, ethics, and effectiveness in the delivery of services and care
Incorporate the voices and choices of older adults in order to promote just and effective social
and health policy and practice
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
193
Buck Institute for Research on Aging
About:
The Buck Institute is the nation’s rst independent research facility focused solely on understanding
the connection between aging and chronic disease in pursuit of the Mission to increase the healthy
years of life.
At the Buck Institute, world-class scientists work in a uniquely collaborative environment to understand
how normal aging contributes to the development of conditions specically associated with getting
older such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, cancer, stroke, osteoporosis, heart disease,
diabetes, macular degeneration and glaucoma. Their interdisciplinary approach brings scientists
from disparate elds together to develop diagnostic tests and treatments to prevent or delay these
maladies.
The stakes have never been higher. While it’s true that people are living longer, those “extra” years
are often marked by disability and pain. In addition to personal hardship, there is also a cost to society.
The nancial burden of treating the chronic diseases of aging is expected to rise steadily as Baby
Boomers get older. There is an urgency to our mission.
Unlike traditional universities, which have departmental boundaries and large bureaucracies, the
Buck Institute is designed for the free ow of information. Discoveries quickly result in new studies.
Scientists studying breast cancer are collaborating with researchers examining aging and nutrition.
Parkinson’s disease is being studied in three different model organisms. A unique inquiry into stem
cells and aging is underway. It’s an exciting place for science that has the potential to change the way
we live.
Website: http://www.buckinstitute.org/
City: Novato / CA
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
the aging process
the development of age-related diseases
the potential use of stem cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases and arthritis
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
194
Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging (From Research to
Action) CCAA
About:
The CCAA specializes in carrying out research on physical activity and aging, and based on the
evidence, designing and implementing exercise programs that are safe and age-appropriate.
Research conducted through the CCAA uses both basic and applied research approaches to broaden
the knowledge base of information related to older adults and physical activity. In-house exercise
programs are offered Monday to Friday to over 500 community-dwelling older adults. The average
age of these participants is 75, some are as young as 50 and several are in their 90s. CCAA exercise
programs include combined tness classes, personal training, strength training, dynamic balance
training, lifestyle coaching and the Get Fit for Active Living (exercise and education for beginner senior
exercisers).
Website: http://www.uwo.ca/ccaa/
City: London
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
To become a high-quality national centre supporting physical activity for the aging population.
To become the national coordinating and accreditation institute for CCAA’s community-based
programs and services for the elderly.
To support, encourage and disseminate nationally research into an active lifestyle for older
adults, and to act as a resource for Health Canada and other national organizations.
To establish international alliances and promote an open exchange of scientic knowledge,
health and community programs to benet active older adults.
To educate provincial governments, industry and social agencies on the benets of an active
aging population.
To be the national data centre for information on activity and aging.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
195
Centre for Active Management of Lifelong Ageing (CAMLA)
About:
CAMLA supports and fosters research within the ageing research community locally, nationally and
internationally. The centre provides advice and support to researchers with an interest in Lifelong
Ageing. Currently a group of researchers interested in developing electronic aids to independent
living has come together to explore ideas from both an engineering and clinical perspective; out of this
meeting of minds has evolved the CAMLA - Connected Health Implementation Pilot (CHIP) which is a
collaborative project being jointly led by medical and engineering researchers.
Also, CAMLA provide educations for the future health professionals. The graduate entry medical
programme at the University of Limerick will produce doctors who are competent, condent and
caring; who understand the scientic basis of medicine; who recognise the social and environmental
context in which health and illness exist and in which medicine is practised; and who have skills for
and commitment to service, teamwork, scientic enquiry, self-fullment and life-long learning.
Website: http://www.foragenetwork.eu/database/item/305-ireland-centre-for-active-management-of-
lifelong-ageing-camla/
City: Limerick
Country: Ireland
Mission/Research Topics:
Support and foster research within the ageing research community locally,
nationally and internationally.
Provides advice and support to researchers with an interest in Lifelong Ageing.
Bring together researchers interested in developing electronic aids to
independent living to explore ideas from both an engineering and clinical perspective.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
196
Centre for Ageing and Pastoral Studies (CAPS)
About:
The centre provides scholarships for ageing and pastoral studies. Quality of life issues for older
people, including living with dementia, are subjects for research and education.
Website:
City: Barton
Country: Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
Bring together practitioners, researchers and older people around key
developments and issues in ageing and spirituality.
Research aged-related life-changing events and baby boomer spirituality.
Research ways to minimise the impact of depression and dementia on elders.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
197
Centre for Ageing and Supportive Environments (CASE)
About:
Older people, the ageing population, and supportive environments for mobility, activity, and health are
the focus of their work. CASE produces research of high relevance to society at large by supporting
the development of supportive environments for healthy ageing. Older people and their organizations
are engaged in the work through a Board of Users with the goal to ensure that the results will have
direct impact on older people’s everyday lives at individual, group and community levels. Furthermore,
CASE provides an excellent environment where tomorrow’s researchers on ageing get the training
required to develop and implement research-based, practical strategies for supportive environments
in various sectors.
The centre is focused on person-environment relations inuencing functional capacity, activity,
participation, mobility, safety, and health in the ageing person and population.
CASE consists of teams from the Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Engineering and Faculty of Social
Sciences at Lund University. Activities have focused on older people at the individual, group, and
population levels and on environments that support health, activity, and participation.
The research is explicitly interdisciplinary in nature with extensive international cooperation. A
Graduate School is integrated with the centre.
The target groups for research at CASE are older people and the ageing population. The environments
that the research focuses on are housing including the immediate surroundings and the trafc
environment in the local community (i.e. the venues where older people do their daily activities), but
CASE also considers the social and cultural aspects of the environments. The results are intended to
be useful for many groups, mostly older people but also those in charge of community planning that
supports the healthy aging process, such as local authorities, housing associations and operators
of public transportation. Research on and implementation of research results into practice is an
important part of the work at the Centre with well-developed collaborations with research groups at
other universities, both in Sweden and abroad.
Website: https://www.med.lu.se/english/case
City: Lund
Country: Sweden
Mission/Research Topics:
Research focused on older people in relation to their environments.
Research into population levels on environments.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
198
Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland
(CARDI)
About:
CARDI will advance the ageing research agenda by identifying, coordinating, stimulating, and
communicating strategic research on ageing and older people as a means to improve the lives of
older people in Ireland. It funds, publishes, and disseminates research on topics relating to ageing
and older people.
They are a not for prot organisation developed by leaders from the ageing eld across Ireland
(North and South) including researchers, academics, statutory, voluntary and community sector
representatives with support from The Atlantic Philanthropies.
The Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland (CARDI) became part of Institute of
Public Health in September 2015.
Website: http://www.cardi.ie
City: Belfast
Country: Ireland
Mission/Research Topics:
Bring together age focused researchers, academics, statutory, voluntary and
community sector representatives.
Funds, publishes and disseminates research on topics relating to ageing and
older people.
It also hosts events on a variety of research and policy topics.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
199
Centre for Cultural Diversity in Ageing
About:
The Centre for Cultural Diversity in Ageing is a Victorian based organisation that primarily supports
the aged care sector address the needs of elderly people from culturally and linguistically diverse
backgrounds. The Centre provides training, consultancy and resources to the aged care sector and
also support culturally and linguistically diverse communities to better understand the aged care
services available in Australia.
The Centre for Cultural Diversity in Ageing provides expertise in culturally inclusive policy and practices
for the aged services sector. They have over 20 years of experience in supporting aged care providers
to address the needs of older people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
Their services include specialist training, expert consultancy and resource development. They also
undertake project work to enhance quality aged care services.
The Centre for Cultural Diversity in Ageing is a trading name of Anglican Aged Care Services Group
and currently receives project funding from the Australian Department of Health to administer the
Partners in Culturally Appropriate Care (PICAC) program in Victoria. This program aims to ensure
that the aged care needs of older people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are
identied and addressed.
Website: http://www.culturaldiversity.com.au
City: Melbourne
Country: Australia
Mission/Research Topics:
Expertise in culturally inclusive policy and practices for the aged services sector.
Specialist training, expert consultancy and resource development. We also
undertake project work to enhance quality aged care services.
Ensuring that the aged care needs of older people from culturally and
linguistically diverse backgrounds are identied and addressed.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
200
Centre for Policy on Ageing (CPA)
About:
The Centre for Policy on Ageing, established in 1947 by the Nufeld Foundation, has a long and
distinguished record as an independent charity promoting the interests of older people through
research, policy analysis and the dissemination of information.
The centre aims to raise awareness of issues around all aspects of ageing and to support good
practice. CPA sustains a network of learning around ageing.
An important and unique aspect of the Centre’s work is to act as a hub to encourage the creative
exchange of thinking and information on ageing issues. A key element of this work is making knowledge
on ageing issues widely accessible to share learning and underpin policy initiatives to support older
people. CPA collaborates with national and local government, practitioners, the academic community,
Voluntary groups and older people to sustain a network of learning around ageing.
The Centre works in partnership to inuence policy and encourage debate on issues affecting older
people. It is engaged with many statutory and voluntary groups concerned with older people and
contributes to advisory groups, expert working parties and forums on a diverse array of issues.
CPA brings together people from different backgrounds to discuss topical issues in small and informal
settings -the involvement of older people in inuencing policy development is one of the Centre’s
primary objectives.
Website: http://www.cpa.org.uk/index.html
City: London
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Health and social services
Residential and community care
Religious belief
Living arrangements
Transport
Citizenship and leisure activities
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
201
Centre for Social Gerontology
About:
The centre works on the social analysis of ageing.
As critical gerontologists, they view ageing as a life-long process shaped by a wide range of social
factors. Their mission is to conduct research that is at the forefront of ageing studies, and to translate
our ndings into policies and practices that improve the lives of older people. In doing so, they seek to
challenge traditional notions of ageing as problematic and burdensome, and to further understanding
of the psycho-social and cultural dimensions of ageing.
Members of the Centre for Social Gerontology are drawn from a range of disciplines, Schools and
Research Institutes across the University. The Centre’s work is also supported by external colleagues
with backgrounds in academia, practice and policy.
Website: https://www.keele.ac.uk/csg/
City: Keele
Country: UK
Mission/Research Topics:
Family and kinship
Inter-generational relationships
Women and ageing
Social exclusion and inclusion
The social policy of later life
Making Sense of History, Biography, and Health
Ageing, drama and creativity
Cultural value
Late Life Creativity and the ‘new old age’
Theatre as a Pathway to Healthy Ageing
Ageing without Children
Longitudinal study of Ageing in a Retirement Community (LARC)
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
202
Centre on Aging
About:
The Centre on Aging, University of Manitoba, was established on July 1, 1982, with a mandate to
serve as a focal point for the conduct of research on aging. The Centre has developed a national and
international reputation for excellence in research.
The experiences of aging individuals and the dynamics of an aging society are investigated using
rigorous scientic standards. Community representatives contribute to projects, and the Centre
distributes its ndings to administrators, policy makers, practitioners, and seniors to assist them in
making decisions.
The Centre on Aging believes listening to older adults and those who work with them ensures more
appropriate research. Dialogue is encouraged through:
An annual spring symposium which brings together researchers and community representatives;
Informal seminars on current research and future directions;
Public lectures by internationally renowned researchers; and
A newsletter published three times each year.
The centre conducts, stimulates, and promotes research on ageing, provides an interdisciplinary
focus for the research activities in ageing at the university in Manitoba, and supports the teaching.
The centre distributes its ndings to administration, policy makers, practitioners, and seniors to assist
them in making decisions.
To be a local, national, and international leader in research on aging, its application, and training, to
promote the well-being of older adults.
Website: http://umanitoba.ca/centres/aging/
City: Winnipeg
Country: Canada
Mission/Research Topics:
Chronic health problems (dementia, arthritis, depression)
Consequences of early brain damage to normal aging,
Changes in memory function with advancing age
Neuronal plasticity
Memory encoding/impairments after stroke, trauma, and seizure activity
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
203
Center for Aging & Community (CAC), University of
Indianapolis
About:
The University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community (CAC) is one of Indiana‘s leading centers
for Aging Studies, using an interdisciplinary approach to developing partnerships between higher
education, business organizations and the community. They offering online education to prepare
undergraduate and graduate students for successful careers working with, for, and on behalf of older
adults. In addition, they provide research and consultation services to civic, philanthropic, business,
and community organizations who are working to serve older adults. By working with organizations
and individuals who work with the aging population, CAC seeks to improve the quality of life for older
adults across Indiana and beyond.
The Center prides itself on being a champion for advancing the new reality of older adults as corporate,
community, and family assets.
The University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community is guided by the belief that it must
move beyond the medical model in its approach to aging issues, viewing older adults holistically and
acknowledging that they are community assets. CAC’s programs, policies, and partnerships must
therefore promote positive aging and an age-friendly society in practical ways.
The Center holds that the keys to optimal aging are maintaining health; preventing disease, injury,
and disability; maximizing independence; and maintaining active participation with the community.
Recognizing the value of interdisciplinary collaboration in developing approaches that are centered
on the needs of clients, families, and caregivers, the Center balances theory and practice to create
effective partnerships with community members and agencies. Because it is committed to being a
resource for students and community agencies in the eld of aging studies, CAC’s efforts are devoted
to solving real-world problems in a responsible and responsive manner.
Website: http://www.uindy.edu/cac
City: Indianapolis / IN
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Develop partnerships between higher education, business organizations, and the community.
Offer outstanding online education in aging studies.
Provide research and consultation services to civic, philanthropic, business, and community
organizations who are working to serve older adults.
Collaborate, educate, and conduct research to enhance the quality of life for all people as they
age.
Catalyst for change that leads to a world in which all people age with dignity and optimal health.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
204
Center on Aging
About:
The mission of the center is to promote and facilitate activities on ageing in the areas of education,
research and evaluation, and community service to maximize the quality of life of older citizens and
their families
Website: https://mainecenteronaging.umaine.edu
City: Bangor
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Promote and facilitate activities on aging in the areas of education, research and evaluation.
Community service to maximize the quality of life of older citizens and their families in Maine and
beyond.
Provide opportunities for older citizens to engage in productive activities that enhance the quality
of their own lives and provide meaningful benets to the communities in which they live.
Make available to the state’s public, voluntary and proprietary organizations research and
evaluation expertise on aging-related issues.
Promote aging-related education and training programs for Maine’s citizenry at the undergraduate,
graduate, and continuing education levels.
Serve as a direct link between the University and the citizens of Maine in order to expand the
range of learning opportunities and practical experiences for UMaine students preparing for
careers working with Maine’s older adults.
Promote collaboration and partnerships between UMaine and public and private service providers
with aging-related interests throughout the state, including other University of Maine System
institutions, the region, and in Canada.
Serve as a consultative resource and clearinghouse for aging information and training needed by
the business, health, and human service communities throughout the state and the region.
Help the state build an expanding cadre of educators, scientists, and other specialists in the eld
of aging who will, in turn, apply their expertise to preparing the state for an aging populace.
Support the work of existing University of Maine System-sponsored and afliated housing,
community, and service projects for older adults.
Enhance UMaine faculty and researcher expertise in service to the older adult community and the
organizations that serve them within their respective elds and encourage faculty to develop new
expertise in gerontology and geriatrics for future service to an aging Maine.
Top 100 Non-Prots in Geroscience
205
Comprehensive Center on Brain Aging - An NYULMC
Center of Excellence
About:
NYU Langone Health is a world-class, patient-centered, integrated academic medical center, known
for its excellence in clinical care, research, and education. Included in the 200+ locations throughout
the New York area are ve inpatient locations: Tisch Hospital, its agship acute-care facility; Rusk
Rehabilitation, ranked as one of the top 10 rehabilitation programs in the country; NYU Langone
Orthopedic Hospital, a dedicated inpatient orthopedic hospital with all musculoskeletal specialties
ranked top 10 in the country; Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital at NYU Langone, a comprehensive
pediatric hospital supporting a full array of children’s health services; and NYU Langone Hospital—
Brooklyn, a full-service teaching hospital and level 1 trauma center located in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.
The centre is devoted to research and clinical advances toward the treatment and cure of
neurodegenerative diseases affecting cognition, the focus is on healthy brain ageing, Alzheimer‘s
disease and memory disorders, Parkinson‘s disease and movement disorders, atypical dementias,
and geriatric psychiatry.
Website:
City: New York / NY
Country: USA
Mission/Research Topics:
Cell survival and rescue
Synapse physiology
Biology of tau and amyloid proteins</